108

Given a template class like the following:

template<typename Type, typename IDType=typename Type::IDType>
class Mappings
{
public:
    ...
    Type valueFor(const IDType& id) { // return value }
    ...
};

How can someone forward declare this class in a header file?

110

This is how you would do it:

template<typename Type, typename IDType=typename Type::IDType>
class Mappings;

template<typename Type, typename IDType>
class Mappings
{
public:
    ...
    Type valueFor(const IDType& id) { // return value }
    ...
};

Note that the default is in the forward declaration and not in the actual definition.

  • It's possible to forward-declare a class that has its defaults listed in its definition. See my answer. – Elliott Dec 13 '19 at 6:43
  • I disagree. The standard says: "A template-parameter shall not be given default arguments by two different declarations in the same scope". And I found nothing about defaults in the first declaration only. Also the code with the forward declaration and defaults in the definition successfully compiles and run. Are you sure about what you are claiming? Can you provide a quote from the standard? – oleksijp Aug 14 '20 at 16:56
  • @Elliott It seems that it's true. The standard [17.1.9] says: "A default template-argument may be specified in a template declaration." Not must be, but may be. Thus I don't understand why other answers claim that it should be in the first declaration. – oleksijp Aug 14 '20 at 17:03
  • And it seems to be much more convenient to have defaults in the definition. – oleksijp Aug 14 '20 at 17:08
8

You can declare default arguments for a template only for the first declaration of the template. If you want allow users to forward declare a class template, you should provide a forwarding header. If you want to forward declare someone else's class template using defaults, you are out of luck!

  • It's possible to forward-declare a class that has its defaults listed in its definition. See my answer. – Elliott Dec 13 '19 at 6:43
  • I disagree. The standard says: "A template-parameter shall not be given default arguments by two different declarations in the same scope". And I found nothing about defaults in the first declaration only. Also the code with the forward declaration and defaults in the definition successfully compiles and run. Are you sure about what you are claiming? Can you provide a quote from the standard? – oleksijp Aug 14 '20 at 16:57
5

You can declare a templated class whose definition states the default arguments, but any time you reference the class you must include all its arguments until the definition is introduced.

eg. Let's use std::vector without including it (the second argument of std::vector is defined with a default):

namespace std
{
    template<typename, typename>
    class vector;
}

#include <iostream>

template <typename S, typename T>
void Foo (const std::vector<S,T> & vector)
{
    std::cout << "do vector stuff, eg., display size = "
        << vector.size() << std::endl;
}

template <typename T>
void Foo (const T & t)
{
    std::cout << "do non-vector stuff..." << std::endl;
}

We can then use it without including the vector, eg.:

int main ()
{
    Foo(3);
}

...Or we can use it with std::vector, eg.:

#include <vector>

// Now the compiler understands how to handle
// std::vector with one argument
// (making use of its default argument)

int main ()
{
    Foo(std::vector<int>(3));
}

I haven't checked the standards, but this works on clang/gcc with -std=c++98 up to -std=c++17, so if it's not officially a standard then it looks to be unofficially so.

  • Maybe you forget empty angle brackets Foo<> foo;. – oleksijp Aug 16 '20 at 14:57

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