546

What is the right way of initializing a static map? Do we need a static function that will initialize it?

12 Answers 12

756

Using C++11 initializer list {{},{},...}. The order of the initialized elements does not matter. The map will do the ordering by the key for you. If initializing unordered_map, it is the same principle where the sorted order will be determined by the hashing function and will appear to human eye as random:

#include <map>
using namespace std;

map<int, char> m = {{1, 'a'}, {3, 'b'}, {5, 'c'}, {7, 'd'}};

Using Boost.Assign:

#include <map>
#include "boost/assign.hpp"
using namespace std;
using namespace boost::assign;

map<int, char> m = map_list_of (1, 'a') (3, 'b') (5, 'c') (7, 'd');
10
  • 139
    Every time I see something like that done with C++, I think of all the horrendous template code that must be behind it. Good example! Commented Sep 26, 2008 at 10:22
  • 38
    The beauty of all the horrendous template code that implements these utilities is that it is neatly encapsulated in a library and the end user rarely needs to deal with the complexity. Commented Nov 13, 2009 at 18:09
  • 47
    @QBziZ: If your company declines using Boost on the grounds of it not being "standard enough", I wonder what C++ library would be "standard enough". Boost is the standard companion for the C++ coder.
    – DevSolar
    Commented Jan 5, 2012 at 13:04
  • 55
    My problem with Boost (here, and elsewhere) is that you can often get on without it (in this case with C++11 or before C++11 with a function). Boost adds a significant compile time overhead, had tons of files to park into your repository (and to have to copy around/zip/extract if you are making an archive). That's the reason I try not to use it. I know you can choose what files to include/not include, but you usually don't want to have to worry about Boost's cross dependencies with itself so you just copy the whole thing around.
    – bobobobo
    Commented Jun 1, 2013 at 0:43
  • 8
    My problem with Boost is that it often has several new library dependencies, which generally means MORE packages that need to be installed to work correctly. We already need libstdc++. For example, the Boost ASIO library, requires at least 2 new libraries(probably more) that need to be installed. C++11/14 does make it a lot easier to not need Boost.
    – Rahly
    Commented May 31, 2016 at 20:42
140

Best way is to use a function:

#include <map>

using namespace std;

map<int,int> create_map()
{
  map<int,int> m;
  m[1] = 2;
  m[3] = 4;
  m[5] = 6;
  return m;
}

map<int,int> m = create_map();
10
  • 26
    Why is this the 'best'? Why for example is it better than @Dreamer's answer?
    – user207421
    Commented May 6, 2013 at 23:40
  • 8
    I think it's "best" because it's really simple and doesn't depend on other structures existing (such as the Boost::Assign or a reimplementation of it). And compared to @Dreamer's answer, well, I avoid creating a whole structure only for initializing a map ...
    – PierreBdR
    Commented May 10, 2013 at 14:54
  • 3
    Note there is a danger here. extern variables will not have their correct values in this "before main run-time constructor" if the compiler only saw the extern declaration, but has not run into the actual variable definition yet.
    – bobobobo
    Commented Jun 1, 2013 at 16:04
  • 5
    No, the danger is that there is nothing saying in which order the static variables should be initialized (at least across compilation units). But this is not a problem linked to this question. This is a general problem with static variables.
    – PierreBdR
    Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 9:06
  • 8
    no boost AND no C++11 => +1. Notice that function can be used to initialize a const map<int,int> m = create_map() (and so, initialize const members of a class in the initialization list: struct MyClass {const map<int, int> m; MyClass(); }; MyClass::MyClass() : m(create_map())
    – ribamar
    Commented Mar 13, 2015 at 10:00
117

It's not a complicated issue to make something similar to boost. Here's a class with just three functions, including the constructor, to replicate what boost did (almost).

template <typename T, typename U>
class create_map
{
private:
    std::map<T, U> m_map;
public:
    create_map(const T& key, const U& val)
    {
        m_map[key] = val;
    }

    create_map<T, U>& operator()(const T& key, const U& val)
    {
        m_map[key] = val;
        return *this;
    }

    operator std::map<T, U>()
    {
        return m_map;
    }
};

Usage:

std::map mymap = create_map<int, int >(1,2)(3,4)(5,6);

The above code works best for initialization of global variables or static members of a class which needs to be initialized and you have no idea when it gets used first but you want to assure that the values are available in it.

If say, you've got to insert elements into an existing std::map... here's another class for you.

template <typename MapType>
class map_add_values {
private:
    MapType mMap;
public:
    typedef typename MapType::key_type KeyType;
    typedef typename MapType::mapped_type MappedType;

    map_add_values(const KeyType& key, const MappedType& val)
    {
        mMap[key] = val;
    }

    map_add_values& operator()(const KeyType& key, const MappedType& val) {
        mMap[key] = val;
        return *this;
    }

    void to (MapType& map) {
        map.insert(mMap.begin(), mMap.end());
    }
};

Usage:

typedef std::map<int, int> Int2IntMap;
Int2IntMap testMap;
map_add_values<Int2IntMap>(1,2)(3,4)(5,6).to(testMap);

See it in action with GCC 4.7.2 here: http://ideone.com/3uYJiH

############### EVERYTHING BELOW THIS IS OBSOLETE #################

EDIT: The map_add_values class below, which was the original solution I had suggested, would fail when it comes to GCC 4.5+. Please look at the code above for how to add values to existing map.


template<typename T, typename U>
class map_add_values
{
private:
    std::map<T,U>& m_map;
public:
    map_add_values(std::map<T, U>& _map):m_map(_map){}
    map_add_values& operator()(const T& _key, const U& _val)
    {
        m_map[key] = val;
        return *this;
    }
};

Usage:

std::map<int, int> my_map;
// Later somewhere along the code
map_add_values<int,int>(my_map)(1,2)(3,4)(5,6);

NOTE: Previously I used a operator [] for adding the actual values. This is not possible as commented by dalle.

##################### END OF OBSOLETE SECTION #####################

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  • 3
    I'm using your first sample as <int,string> to bind error-numbers (from an enum) with messages - it is working like a charm - thank you.
    – slashmais
    Commented Sep 22, 2010 at 10:57
  • 1
    operator[] only takes a single argument.
    – dalle
    Commented Jul 25, 2011 at 10:35
  • 1
    @dalle: Good catch! For some reason I thought overloaded [] operators could accept more. Commented Jul 26, 2011 at 10:55
  • 3
    This is a fantastic answer. It's a shame the OP never selected one. You deserve mega props. Commented Sep 26, 2012 at 18:26
  • the map_add_values doesn't work in gcc, which complains: error: conflicting declaration ‘map_add_values<int, int> my_map’ error: ‘my_map’ has a previous declaration as ‘std::map<int, int> my_map’ Commented May 20, 2013 at 5:25
46

Here is another way that uses the 2-element data constructor. No functions are needed to initialize it. There is no 3rd party code (Boost), no static functions or objects, no tricks, just simple C++:

#include <map>
#include <string>

typedef std::map<std::string, int> MyMap;

const MyMap::value_type rawData[] = {
   MyMap::value_type("hello", 42),
   MyMap::value_type("world", 88),
};
const int numElems = sizeof rawData / sizeof rawData[0];
MyMap myMap(rawData, rawData + numElems);

Since I wrote this answer C++11 is out. You can now directly initialize STL containers using the new initializer list feature:

const MyMap myMap = { {"hello", 42}, {"world", 88} };
37

For example:

const std::map<LogLevel, const char*> g_log_levels_dsc =
{
    { LogLevel::Disabled, "[---]" },
    { LogLevel::Info,     "[inf]" },
    { LogLevel::Warning,  "[wrn]" },
    { LogLevel::Error,    "[err]" },
    { LogLevel::Debug,    "[dbg]" }
};

If map is a data member of a class, you can initialize it directly in header by the following way (since C++17):

// Example

template<>
class StringConverter<CacheMode> final
{
public:
    static auto convert(CacheMode mode) -> const std::string&
    {
        // validate...
        return s_modes.at(mode);
    }

private:
    static inline const std::map<CacheMode, std::string> s_modes =
        {
            { CacheMode::All, "All" },
            { CacheMode::Selective, "Selective" },
            { CacheMode::None, "None" }
            // etc
        };
}; 
6
  • In this case in the example, it's better to use std::array Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 7:51
  • @prehistoricpenguin, why?
    – isnullxbh
    Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 7:52
  • For performance reasons, this function may be a hot point, std::array would be faster than a map look up. Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 7:54
  • @prehistoricpenguin, could you provide an example with std::array?
    – isnullxbh
    Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 7:57
  • 2
    Maybe for CPU performance . . . but without knowing the integer value of LogLevel you're taking a risk for memory performance. This enum is going to be terrible in an array. enum LogLevel { Disabled=-100, Info, Warning=500, Error, Debug=32768 };
    – unpoetical
    Commented Jul 28, 2021 at 6:23
26

I would wrap the map inside a static object, and put the map initialisation code in the constructor of this object, this way you are sure the map is created before the initialisation code is executed.

3
  • 1
    I'm with you on this one. It's also a tad faster :)
    – QBziZ
    Commented Sep 26, 2008 at 23:52
  • 3
    Tad faster than what? A global static with an initializer? No, it's not (remember about RVO). Commented Nov 13, 2009 at 19:30
  • 9
    Nice answer. I would be happy if I see the actual example code Commented Jul 22, 2014 at 7:58
20

Just wanted to share a pure C++ 98 work around:

#include <map>

std::map<std::string, std::string> aka;

struct akaInit
{
    akaInit()
    {
        aka[ "George" ] = "John";
        aka[ "Joe" ] = "Al";
        aka[ "Phil" ] = "Sue";
        aka[ "Smitty" ] = "Yando";
    }
} AkaInit;
1
  • 2
    this doesn't work for object without default constructor, insert method should be preferred IMHO Commented Oct 4, 2016 at 9:47
14

You can try:

std::map <int, int> mymap = 
{
        std::pair <int, int> (1, 1),
        std::pair <int, int> (2, 2),
        std::pair <int, int> (2, 2)
};
1
  • 3
    You cannot use initializer lists with non-aggregate types before C++11, in which case you may as well use the shorter syntax {1, 2} instead of std::pair<int, int>(1, 2).
    – Ferruccio
    Commented Feb 21, 2018 at 12:28
10

If you are stuck with C++98 and don't want to use boost, here there is the solution I use when I need to initialize a static map:

typedef std::pair< int, char > elemPair_t;
elemPair_t elemPairs[] = 
{
    elemPair_t( 1, 'a'), 
    elemPair_t( 3, 'b' ), 
    elemPair_t( 5, 'c' ), 
    elemPair_t( 7, 'd' )
};

const std::map< int, char > myMap( &elemPairs[ 0 ], &elemPairs[ sizeof( elemPairs ) / sizeof( elemPairs[ 0 ] ) ] );
8

This is similar to PierreBdR, without copying the map.

#include <map>

using namespace std;

bool create_map(map<int,int> &m)
{
  m[1] = 2;
  m[3] = 4;
  m[5] = 6;
  return true;
}

static map<int,int> m;
static bool _dummy = create_map (m);
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  • 12
    It probably wouldn't have been copied anyway.
    – GManNickG
    Commented Nov 13, 2009 at 19:21
  • 2
    but this way map couldn't be static const, could it?
    – xmoex
    Commented Nov 24, 2013 at 10:58
2

In addition to the good top answer of using

const std::map<int, int> m = {{1,1},{4,2},{9,3},{16,4},{32,9}}

there's an additional possibility by directly calling a lambda that can be useful in a few cases:

const std::map<int, int> m = []()->auto {
  std::map<int, int> m;
  m[1]=1;
  m[4]=2;
  m[9]=3;
  m[16]=4;
  m[32]=9;
  return m;
}();

Clearly a simple initializer list is better when writing this from scratch with literal values, but it does open up additional possibilities:

const std::map<int, int> m = []()->auto {
  std::map<int, int> m;
  for(int i=1;i<5;++i) m[i*i]=i;
  m[32]=9;
  return m;
}();

(Obviously it should be a normal function if you want to re-use it; and this does require recent C++.)

-7

You have some very good answers here, but I'm to me, it looks like a case of "when all you know is a hammer"...

The simplest answer of to why there is no standard way to initialise a static map, is there is no good reason to ever use a static map...

A map is a structure designed for fast lookup, of an unknown set of elements. If you know the elements before hand, simply use a C-array. Enter the values in a sorted manner, or run sort on them, if you can't do this. You can then get log(n) performance by using the stl::functions to loop-up entries, lower_bound/upper_bound. When I have tested this previously they normally perform at least 4 times faster than a map.

The advantages are many fold... - faster performance (*4, I've measured on many CPU's types, it's always around 4) - simpler debugging. It's just easier to see what's going on with a linear layout. - Trivial implementations of copy operations, should that become necessary. - It allocates no memory at run time, so will never throw an exception. - It's a standard interface, and so is very easy to share across, DLL's, or languages, etc.

I could go on, but if you want more, why not look at Stroustrup's many blogs on the subject.

7
  • 8
    Performance is not the only reason for using a map. For example, there are many cases, where you want to link values together (for example, an error code with an error message), and a map makes the use and access relatively simple. But a link to these blog entries may be interesting, maybe I'm doing something wrong.
    – MatthiasB
    Commented Jul 21, 2014 at 12:59
  • 5
    An array is much easier and has higher performance if you can use it. But if the indices (keys) are not contiguous, and widely spaced, you need a map.
    – KarlU
    Commented Oct 28, 2014 at 16:48
  • 1
    A map is also a useful form for representing a partial function (function in the mathematical sense; but also, kind of, in the programming sense). An array does not do that. You can't, say, lookup data from an array using a string.
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jul 20, 2015 at 19:21
  • 3
    Your answer does not attempt to answer the valid question, and instead speculates on the limitations of the language, proposes solutions to different problems, hence downvote. A real scenario - mapping (continuous or not) library error codes to text strings. With array, search time is O(n), which can be improved by static maping to O(log(n)).
    – Tosha
    Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 11:41
  • 2
    If indeed "there is no good reason to ever use a static map..." then it is very strange that syntax (initializer lists) that make them easy to use was added in C++11.
    – ellisbben
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 15:09

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