38

I'm migrating my old blog posts into my new Rails blog, and I want their updated_at attribute to match the corresponding value on my old blog (not the date they were migrated into my new Rails blog).

How can I do this? When I set updated_at manually it gets overridden by the before_save callback.

Note: This question is only valid for Rails < 3.2.11. Newer versions of Rails allow you to manually set timestamps without them being overwritten.

3
  • How are you setting created_at? I don't get the same behavior on rails 2.3.3. It seems like I can set the created_at to anything I want, but cannot set updated_at, which seems to be what Andy's solution fixes from what I've read online so far.
    – theIV
    Sep 6, 2009 at 20:03
  • Whoops! Good point -- you can set created_at to whatever you want. (However, I also needed to set updated_at, so Andy's answer is still good)
    – Tom Lehman
    Sep 6, 2009 at 20:05
  • 1
    Looks like this has been changed in newer Rails versions. With 3.2.11, updated_at can be set for new and existing records and won't be overwritten by ActiveRecord.
    – iGEL
    Jan 13, 2013 at 15:44

6 Answers 6

33

If it's a one time thing you can turn record_timestamps on or off.

ActiveRecord::Base.record_timestamps = false

#set timestamps manually

ActiveRecord::Base.record_timestamps = true

When I ran into this issue with my app, I searched around for a bit and this seemed like it made the most sense to me. It's an initializer that I can call where I need to:

module ActiveRecord  
  class Base  

    def update_record_without_timestamping  
      class << self  
        def record_timestamps; false; end  
      end  

      save!  

      class << self  
        def record_timestamps; super ; end  
      end  
    end  

  end  
end  
2
  • 2
    I would not expect this to work well with multithreaded servers.
    – thodg
    Sep 23, 2014 at 11:52
  • 1
    While this recommendation is fine for versions of Rails older than 3.2.11, there is no reason to mess with this unless you do not want the timestamps written at all. Otherwise, just use pauliephonic's solution of explicitly writing them. Apr 11, 2017 at 15:57
10

As of recent versions of Rails (3.2.11 as per iGELs comment) you can set the updated_at property in code and the change will be honoured when saving.

I assume rails is keeping track of 'dirty' properties that have been manually changed and not overwriting on save.

> note = Note.last
  Note Load (1.4ms)  SELECT "notes".* FROM "notes" ORDER BY "notes"."id" DESC LIMIT 1
=> #<Note id: 39, content: "A wee note", created_at: "2015-06-09 11:06:01", updated_at: "2015-06-09 11:06:01">
> note.updated_at = 2.years.ago
=> Sun, 07 Jul 2013 21:20:47 UTC +00:00
> note.save
   (0.4ms)  BEGIN
   (0.8ms)  UPDATE "notes" SET "updated_at" = '2013-07-07 21:20:47.972990' WHERE "notes"."id" = 39
   (0.8ms)  COMMIT
=> true
> note
=> #<Note id: 39, content: "A wee note",  created_at: "2015-06-09 11:06:01", updated_at: "2013-07-07 21:20:47">

So short answer, workarounds are not needed any longer in recent versions of rails.

2
  • Very handy for rails < 5. Starting in Rails 5 touch() accepts a :time => specific_time parameter.
    – jpw
    Oct 9, 2016 at 21:02
  • 1
    This is the right answer for any recent version of Rails. There is no reason to mess with record_timestamps unless you don't want them written. Otherwise, just set them to what you want. Apr 11, 2017 at 15:55
6

I see two ways to accomplish this easily:

touch (Rails >=5)

In Rails 5 you can use the touch method and give a named parameter time like described in the documentation of touch

foo.touch(time: old_timestamp)

update_column (Rails >=4)

If you want it in Rails 4 and lower or want to avoid all callbacks you could use one of the update_column or update_columns methods which bypass all safe or touch callbacks and validations

foo.update_column(updated_at, old_timestamp)

or

foo.update_columns(updated_at: old_timestamp)
3

I took Andy's answer and modified it to accept blocks:

module ActiveRecord
  class Base

    def without_timestamping
      class << self
        def record_timestamps; false; end
      end

      yield

      class << self
        remove_method :record_timestamps
      end
    end

  end
end
2

This is riffing off of Andy Gaskell's answer:

class ActiveRecord::Base
  class_inheritable_writer :record_timestamps
  def do_without_changing_timestamps
    self.class.record_timestamps = false
    yield
  ensure
    self.class.record_timestamps = true
  end
end
1
  • class_inheritable_writer is deprecated in the latest version of Rails. (>=3.1.0)
    – Ajedi32
    Sep 26, 2012 at 20:11
0

The solution is to temporarily set ActiveRecord::Base.record_timestamps to false:

ActiveRecord::Base.record_timestamps = false

# Make whatever changes you want to the timestamps here

ActiveRecord::Base.record_timestamps = true

If you want a somewhat more robust solution, you may want to try something like what mrm suggested:

module ActiveRecord
  class Base

    def self.without_timestamping
      timestamping = self.record_timestamps
      begin
        self.record_timestamps = false
        yield
      ensure
        self.record_timestamps = timestamping
      end 
    end

  end
end

Then you can easily make changes to models without their timestamps being automatically updated:

ActiveRecord::Base.without_timestamping do
  foo = Foo.first
  bar = Bar.first
  foo.updated_at = 1.month.ago
  bar.updated_at = foo.updated_at + 1.week
  foo.save!
  bar.save!
end

Or, if you only want to update records from a specific class without timestamping:

module ActiveRecord
  class Base
    # Don't delete Rail's ActiveRecord::Base#inherited method
    self.singleton_class.send(:alias_method, :__inherited__, :inherited)
    def self.inherited(subclass)
      __inherited__

      # Adding class methods to `subclass`
      class << subclass

        def without_timestamping
          # Temporarily override record_timestamps for this class
          class << self
            def record_timestamps; false; end
          end
          yield
        ensure
          class << self
            remove_method :record_timestamps
          end
        end

      end

    end
  end
end

E.g:

Foo.without_timestamping do
  foo = Foo.first
  bar = Bar.new(foo: foo)
  foo.updated_at = 1.month.ago
  foo.save! # Timestamps not automatically updated
  bar.save! # Timestamps updated normally
end

Or you could use an approach similar to what Venkat D. suggested, which works on a per-instance basis:

module ActiveRecord
  class Base

    def without_timestamping
      class << self
        def record_timestamps; false; end
      end
      yield
    ensure
      class << self
        remove_method :record_timestamps
      end
    end

  end
end

E.g:

foo = Foo.first
foo.without_timestamping do
  foo2 = Foo.new(parent: foo)
  foo.updated_at = 1.month.ago
  foo.save! # Timestamps not automatically updated
  foo2.save! # Timestamps updated normally
end

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