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I would like to know what are all the possible values for the timezone argument in the Python library pytz. How to do it?

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  • Moderator note: Please leave your question as a question. You can write your own solution in an answer post, instead.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Feb 26 at 17:41
456

You can list all the available timezones with pytz.all_timezones:

In [40]: import pytz
In [41]: pytz.all_timezones
Out[42]: 
['Africa/Abidjan',
 'Africa/Accra',
 'Africa/Addis_Ababa',
 ...]

There is also pytz.common_timezones:

In [45]: len(pytz.common_timezones)
Out[45]: 403

In [46]: len(pytz.all_timezones)
Out[46]: 563
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  • 14
    In addition to all_timezones, pytz also provides common_timezones. May 21 '13 at 19:10
  • 4
    why is China missing?
    – Adders
    Aug 29 '17 at 16:09
  • 11
    China uses a single timezone, whose timezone name is 'Asia/Shanghai'.
    – unutbu
    Aug 29 '17 at 18:15
  • 1
    This expression shows the terrible result pytz can give: (datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=pytz.timezone('Asia/Shanghai')) - datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=pytz.timezone('UTC'))).total_seconds() (the result is not -28800). I will avoid pytz—dateutil.tz provides similar functionalities but uses the OS timezone database and has no such problems.
    – Yongwei Wu
    Feb 1 '18 at 15:17
  • 4
    @YongweiWu it is a wrong API usage. You shouldn't pass a pytz timezone with a non-fixed utc offset as a tzinfo argument directly. Use .localize() method as the pytz docs suggest.
    – jfs
    May 9 '18 at 11:20
62

Don't create your own list - pytz has a built-in set:

import pytz
set(pytz.all_timezones_set)  
>>> {'Europe/Vienna', 'America/New_York', 'America/Argentina/Salta',..}

You can then apply a timezone:

import datetime
tz = pytz.timezone('Pacific/Johnston')
ct = datetime.datetime.now(tz=tz)
>>> ct.isoformat()
2017-01-13T11:29:22.601991-05:00

Or if you already have a datetime object that is TZ aware (not naive):

# This timestamp is in UTC
my_ct = datetime.datetime.now(tz=pytz.UTC)

# Now convert it to another timezone
new_ct = my_ct.astimezone(tz)
>>> new_ct.isoformat()
2017-01-13T11:29:22.601991-05:00
34

The timezone name is the only reliable way to specify the timezone.

You can find a list of timezone names here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tz_database_time_zones Note that this list contains a lot of alias names, such as US/Eastern for the timezone that is properly called America/New_York.

If you programatically want to create this list from the zoneinfo database you can compile it from the zone.tab file in the zoneinfo database. I don't think pytz has an API to get them, and I also don't think it would be very useful.

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  • Letting people choose their timezone from a list is quite useful. Plenty of websites and Linux installers do that already.
    – qris
    Nov 9 '20 at 11:30
24

Here, Python list of country codes, names, continents, capitals, and pytz timezones.

countries = [
{'timezones': ['Europe/Paris'], 'code': 'FR', 'continent': 'Europe', 'name': 'France', 'capital': 'Paris'}
{'timezones': ['Africa/Kampala'], 'code': 'UG', 'continent': 'Africa', 'name': 'Uganda', 'capital': 'Kampala'},
{'timezones': ['Asia/Colombo'], 'code': 'LK', 'continent': 'Asia', 'name': 'Sri Lanka', 'capital': 'Sri Jayewardenepura Kotte'},
{'timezones': ['Asia/Riyadh'], 'code': 'SA', 'continent': 'Asia', 'name': 'Saudi Arabia', 'capital': 'Riyadh'},
{'timezones': ['Africa/Luanda'], 'code': 'AO', 'continent': 'Africa', 'name': 'Angola', 'capital': 'Luanda'},    
{'timezones': ['Europe/Vienna'], 'code': 'AT', 'continent': 'Europe', 'name': 'Austria', 'capital': 'Vienna'},
{'timezones': ['Asia/Calcutta'], 'code': 'IN', 'continent': 'Asia', 'name': 'India', 'capital': 'New Delhi'},
{'timezones': ['Asia/Dubai'], 'code': 'AE', 'continent': 'Asia', 'name': 'United Arab Emirates', 'capital': 'Abu Dhabi'},
{'timezones': ['Europe/London'], 'code': 'GB', 'continent': 'Europe', 'name': 'United Kingdom', 'capital': 'London'},
]

For full list : Gist Github

Hope, It helps.

0
9

EDIT: I would appreciate it if you do not downvote this answer further. This answer is wrong, but I would rather retain it as a historical note. While it is arguable whether the pytz interface is error-prone, it can do things that dateutil.tz cannot do, especially regarding daylight-saving in the past or in the future. I have honestly recorded my experience in an article "Time zones in Python".


If you are on a Unix-like platform, I would suggest you avoid pytz and look just at /usr/share/zoneinfo. dateutil.tz can utilize the information there.

The following piece of code shows the problem pytz can give. I was shocked when I first found it out. (Interestingly enough, the pytz installed by yum on CentOS 7 does not exhibit this problem.)

import pytz
import dateutil.tz
from datetime import datetime
print((datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=pytz.timezone('Asia/Shanghai'))
     - datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=pytz.timezone('UTC')))
     .total_seconds())
print((datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=dateutil.tz.gettz('Asia/Shanghai'))
     - datetime(2017,2,13,14,29,29, tzinfo=dateutil.tz.tzutc()))
     .total_seconds())

-29160.0
-28800.0

I.e. the timezone created by pytz is for the true local time, instead of the standard local time people observe. Shanghai conforms to +0800, not +0806 as suggested by pytz:

pytz.timezone('Asia/Shanghai')
<DstTzInfo 'Asia/Shanghai' LMT+8:06:00 STD>

EDIT: Thanks to Mark Ransom's comment and downvote, now I know I am using pytz the wrong way. In summary, you are not supposed to pass the result of pytz.timezone(…) to datetime, but should pass the datetime to its localize method.

Despite his argument (and my bad for not reading the pytz documentation more carefully), I am going to keep this answer. I was answering the question in one way (how to enumerate the supported timezones, though not with pytz), because I believed pytz did not provide a correct solution. Though my belief was wrong, this answer is still providing some information, IMHO, which is potentially useful to people interested in this question. Pytz's correct way of doing things is counter-intuitive. Heck, if the tzinfo created by pytz should not be directly used by datetime, it should be a different type. The pytz interface is simply badly designed. The link provided by Mark shows that many people, not just me, have been misled by the pytz interface.

6
  • 2
    See stackoverflow.com/questions/11473721/… for a fix. There's nothing wrong with pytz, you're just using it wrong. P.S. This is not an answer to the question at all. Feb 1 '18 at 16:17
  • 1
    @MarkRansom Good info, and it is nice to know. However, I do not buy your argument. The interface is designed wrong, period. It is very much counterintuitive.
    – Yongwei Wu
    Feb 2 '18 at 2:06
  • 3
    Yes, the interface is designed wrong. But it's the datetime interface that's wrong, not pytz. datetime did not anticipate intelligent timezone objects, so its interface does not initialize them properly. Feb 2 '18 at 4:28
  • 1
    With respect, I disagree. datetime is part of the standard Python library, and it is pytz that should follow the datetime interface, not vice versa. If anybody could implement some interface in the way they think better without consensus, there would be no robust software.
    – Yongwei Wu
    Feb 2 '18 at 6:57
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    As I said, pytz can't follow the datetime interface because the datetime interface is deficient. The authors of that interface did not anticipate the problems of a timezone whose parameters change over the years. Just because it's part of the standard Python distribution does not mean it's perfect. Feb 2 '18 at 7:11
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They appear to be populated by the tz database time zones found here.

enter image description here

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  • 1
    pytz provides access to the tz database (it is the source for the wikipedia data).
    – jfs
    Oct 2 '15 at 11:02
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Available from Python3.9:

zoneinfo,new module in Python3.9 which works against the database of IANA. In order to grab all the available timezones, first:

pip install tzdata

And then:

import zoneinfo

print(zoneinfo.available_timezones())
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you will find all the pytz supported timezones here:

https://gist.github.com/heyalexej/8bf688fd67d7199be4a1682b3eec7568

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  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review
    – Rainald62
    Oct 15 at 10:43
-9

In my opinion this is a design flaw of pytz library. It should be more reliable to specify a timezone using the offset, e.g.

pytz.construct("UTC-07:00")

which gives you Canada/Pacific timezone.

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  • 16
    Offsets change throughout the year (usually because of daylight saving time), so that's not the same as what we normally think of as a timezone. Sep 21 '16 at 15:06
  • The chosen syntax is based on the definitions in tzdata.
    – Brad Koch
    Mar 1 '19 at 13:27

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