30

I need to know the complete file path when I grep.

I use commands like

cat *.log | grep somethingtosearch

Now what I need to show the result with complete file path from where the matched result were taken out.

Help anyone?

13

Assuming you have two log-files in:

  • C:/temp/my.log
  • C:/temp/alsoMy.log

cd to C: and use:

grep -r somethingtosearch temp/*.log

It will give you a list like:

temp/my.log:somethingtosearch
temp/alsoMy.log:somethingtosearch1
temp/alsoMy.log:somethingtosearch2
  • How can I get the line number of the searched content? – Özzesh Apr 29 '13 at 6:26
  • @Özzesh add -n for reporting linenumbers – Schpaencoder Nov 27 '17 at 13:02
18

Have you tried using the -l flag?

grep -l somethingtosearch

This will return just the paths and file names where the search was found, not the whole lines where the match was made.

Use with -r flag for recursion.

  • 12
    grep -l will only give filename not complete path – Kapil Feb 22 '17 at 7:40
5

I fall here when I was looking exactly for the same problem and maybe it can help other.

I think the real solution is:

cat *.log | grep -H somethingtosearch
  • If you pipe the file contents to grep instead of passing file names as arguments, grep cannot know file names and prints "(standard input)" instead. – EndlosSchleife Aug 2 '19 at 9:07
  • 2
    this is the only solution that seems correct based on my understanding of the question. -H will show the path to the file that was searched. brilliant – activedecay Nov 4 '19 at 19:46
4

If you want to see the full paths, I would recommend to cd to the top directory (of your drive if using windows)

cd C:\
grep -r somethingtosearch C:\Users\Ozzesh\temp

Or on Linux:

cd /
grep -r somethingtosearch ~/temp

if you really resist on your file name filtering (*.log) AND you want recursive (files are not all in the same directory), combining find and grep is the most flexible way:

cd /
find ~/temp -iname '*.log' -type f -exec grep somethingtosearch '{}' \;
1

Command:

grep -rl --include="*.js" "searchString" ${PWD}

Returned output:

/root/test/bas.js
  • it is printing one directory two times, one with absolute path and one with relative path, can I ignore relative path somehow? – Wasim A. Dec 15 '18 at 11:33
0

for me
grep -b "searchsomething" *.log worked as I wanted

  • 3
    It's not about what you want, it's about what OP wants. – a20 May 12 '17 at 5:15
0

The easiest way to print full paths is replace relative start path with absolute path:

grep -r --include="*.sh" "pattern" ${PWD}
  • it is printing one directory two times, one with absolute path and one with relative path, can I ignore relative path somehow? – Wasim A. Dec 15 '18 at 11:33
0

It is similar to BVB Media's answer.

grep -rnw 'blablabla' `pwd`

It works fine on my ubuntu bash.

  • it is printing one directory two times, one with absolute path and one with relative path, can I ignore relative path somehow? – Wasim A. Dec 15 '18 at 11:33
  • @WasimA. It only prints absolute path, not with relative path on my bash. do you have different environment? I'm using ubuntu 16.04 lts. – w..k Mar 14 '19 at 22:55
-1

Use:

grep somethingtosearch *.log

and the filenames will be printed out along with the matches.

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