I'm trying to use css property height 100% in order for a div taking all available space in the browser. I can make it work with Chrome and Firefox but not with IE8. Actually I understand that in IE8 height 100% means 100% of the size of the immediate parent unlike in Firefox or Chrome where it means 100% of the available space.

I came up with this sample http://jsfiddle.net/GdqjK/

html, body {
  margin: 0; padding: 0;
  bottom:0px;
  height:100%;
}

.grid {
  display : table;
  width:100%;
}

.tablerow {
  display : table-row;
}

.tablecell {
  display : table-cell;
}

.grow {
  bottom:0px;
  height:100%;
} 

<div class="grid grow"> 
    <div class="tablerow">
        <div class="tablecell">
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
        </div>
    </div> 

    <div class="tablerow grow">
        <div class="tablecell grow" style="border: solid 3px">
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
        </div>
    </div> 

</div> 

You can see that running it with IE8 , the second row is much bigger. Is there any workaround without using fixed height? I would like to keep the same behavior of the div taking all the available space. If there is no solution to make it works with IE8 what would be the best degraded solution (maybe with conditional css for IE8). Thank you very much for your help.

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This one works for IE8+

http://jsfiddle.net/DNEb3/2/


<div class="grid"> 
    <div class="tablerow">
        <div class="tablecell" style="border: solid 3px">
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
        </div>
    </div> 

    <div class="tablerow grow">
        <div class="tablecell" style="border: solid 3px">
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
            a<br>
        </div>
    </div> 

</div> 

</body></html>​


html, body {
  margin: 0; padding: 0;
  bottom:0px;
  height:100%;
}

.grid {
  display : table;
  width:100%;
    height: 100%
}

.tablerow {
  display : table-row;
}

.tablecell {
  display : table-cell;
}
.grow {
  bottom:0px;
  height:100%;
}    

100% height can be accomplished using tables.

Just make sure that your <html> and <body> are both of 100% height as well.

Full working example:

<!doctype html>
<html style='height:100%;'>
<body style='margin:0; height:100%;'> <!-- margin:0 is optional -->

<table style='background:green; height:100%;'>
    <tr>
        <td>Content</td>
    </tr> 
</table>

</body>
</html>
  • 4
    The user is trying to get a DIV to be 100% height, definitely indicating he is trying to lay content out. Using an actual table for this is very bad practice. stackoverflow.com/questions/83073/… smashingmagazine.com/2009/04/08/from-table-hell-to-div-hell – Andrew Plummer Aug 6 '14 at 23:15
  • 4
    @AndrewPlummer, Don't just regurgitate, tell me why this is "very bad" here. The above answer provided by kcsoft looks more of a maintenance mess compared to this answer. Also, that answer is patently using a table layout too, even though it tries to hide its spots, being ashamed of what it actually is. – Pacerier Aug 7 '14 at 18:19
  • 5
    1. You are mixing structure and style. Is what you are laying out a table of data? "The HTML Table Element (<table>) represents data in two dimensions or more." - MDN Semantically, using a table for layout makes no sense at all. This is bad particularly accessibility and maintainability. However, you are also writing content to a specification, and people older and wiser than us explicitly state not to do this. See 11.1p 6 w3.org/TR/html401/struct/tables.html an Structure and Presentation: "w3.org/TR/html401/appendix/notes.html#notes-tables"; – Andrew Plummer Aug 11 '14 at 0:13
  • 1
    To clarify my previous point, "Tables should not be used purely as a means to layout document content ... authors should use style sheets to control layout rather than tables." - W3C. 11 Tables - 11.1 Introduction to tables p6. The above answer (not yours) is the correct answer, and yours is patently incorrect. It is sad that you would rather artificially inflate your answer that promotes structure that makes the internet harder for disadvantaged people. Or at least, clarify why you know better than W3C, MDN, even dedicated wikipedia page en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tableless_web_design – Andrew Plummer Aug 13 '14 at 2:14
  • 1
    ..... And lastly: you stated that my answer is "patently incorrect". Trying to believe that we are all adults here, I tested my code again to see if it works. And it does work, so why do you say that this answer is "patently incorrect"? This answer does answer the question asked, thus I would not delete it despite the mass downvotes from your friends. (Btw, groupthink is a subtle yet dangerous thing, it's the very reason W3C refused to accept whatwg for a whole 2.5 yrs.) If I had indeed been mistaken and a flame war was actually the intended outcome, then do feel free to ignore my replies. – Pacerier Aug 13 '14 at 9:59

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