27

Is it safe to do something like this with CDI?

@Named
@ApplicationScoped
public class DAO {

   @PersistenceContext
   private EntityManager entityManager;

}

I understand that EntityManager itself is not thread-safe, and therefore should not be used in a shared global context like @ApplicationScoped. However, since the injected object with @PersistenceContext is actually a thread-aware wrapper around an underlying EntityManager, does that make this ok?

I've seen other posts on the subject but haven't been able to figure out an authoritative answer for this specific case. For example:

Java CDI @PersistenceContext and thread safety

It looks like it's safe to use with @Stateless, for instance - but I'm not sure if that's because of the way @Stateless works, or because of something intrinsic to @PersistenceContext itself.

EDIT The source of my confusion is that the @PersistenceContext injected EntityManager wrapper seems to be aware of the current thread, in order to figure out whether there's already a transaction in progress. So perhaps I'm confusing thread-awareness with thread-safety and they're two different things.

26

I'm pretty sure that in this case CDI does not create a contextual proxy for the entity manager. After all, what scope would it be in? You may want something akin to a hypothetical @ThreadScoped or just @RequestScoped, but @PersistenceContext is not a CDI annotation and CDI does not modify its semantics.

So what's happening here is the Java EE 6 platform "managed bean" injection, which is similar to injecting the entity manager in a Servlet. Both cases give you an instance that is not thread-safe to use directly.

It looks like it's safe to use with @Stateless, for instance - but I'm not sure if that's because of the way @Stateless works, or because of something intrinsic to @PersistenceContext itself.

It's because of the way @Stateless works. Every request (call) to a method on a stateless bean is routed by the container to a unique instance. The container guarantees that no two threads are ever active in the same bean.

With CDI you can get a similar effect per request by encapsulating the entity manager in a request scoped bean and injecting that into the application scoped one:

import javax.enterprise.context.RequestScoped;
import javax.persistence.EntityManager;
import javax.persistence.PersistenceContext;

@RequestScoped
public class EntityManagerProvider {

    @PersistenceContext
    private EntityManager entityManager;

    public EntityManager getEntityManager() {
        return entityManager;
    }

}

Inject this into the bean where you previously injected the entity manager:

@Named
@ApplicationScoped
public class DAO {

   @Inject
   private EntityManagerProvider entityManagerProvider;

}

This will give you a unique entity manager per request. You can easily turn this into a producer method as well, so you won't have to call getEntityManager() on the injected provider.

7
  • isnt there some restriction on injecting request scope in app scope? – Aksel Willgert Dec 15 '12 at 15:17
  • 1
    @AkselWillgert >isnt there some restriction on injecting request scope in app scope? - Nope, the native JSF managed beans where CDI partially draws its inspiration from had that limitation. CDI fixed this, and this is expressed by the C in CDI -> injections (when managed by CDI) are context aware. In this case, even though the bean is application scoped, the proxy that is injected will resolve to an instance in the request scope of the caller. – Arjan Tijms Dec 15 '12 at 17:36
  • 1
    @ArjanTijms - thanks, I think I see my problem. I'm conflating thread-awareness with thread-safety. I feel like the @PersistenceContext wrapper must be aware of the current thread to join or start a new JTA transaction appropriately. But that doesn't mean that the resulting object's state is thread-safe. Does it sound like I got that right? – wrschneider Dec 16 '12 at 3:13
  • It's because of the way @Stateless works. Every request (call) to a method on a stateless bean is routed by the container to a unique instance. This isn't true, Stateless beans often are pooled. "Stateless" refers not to the lifetime of the bean itself, but to the "state of the dialog" between a client and the bean, specifically the lack of such state. It's stateless like HTTP is stateless. – Vsevolod Golovanov Nov 17 '17 at 8:59
  • To quote EJB 3.2 spec 4.3.9.2 Stateless Session Beans: Since stateless session bean instances are typically pooled, the time of the client’s invocation of the create method need not have any direct relationship to the container’s invocation of the PostConstruct/ejbCreate method on the stateless session bean instance. – Vsevolod Golovanov Nov 17 '17 at 8:59
0

What about this approach:


    @RequestScoped
    class EntityManagerProducer {
    
        @PersistenceContext
        private EntityManager entityManager;
    
        @Produces
        @RequestScoped
        public EntityManager produceEntityManager() {
          return this.entityManager;
        }
    }

And in CDI Beans of any scope:


@Inject
private EntityManager entityManager;

The entity manager should be created in every single request, creating a new entity manager when it passes one CDI bean which it injects. In the injected CDI Bean, you get one entity manager which is used within the request. If a transaction is needed, the entity manager will join it. So you get a new entity manager in every request which means, everything is cleaned up at the end and you cannot get thread conflicts. Simple and easy, isn't it?

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