So I'm learning about design patterns in school. Today I was told about the 'Prototype' design pattern.

I must be missing something, because I don't see the benefits from it. I've seen people online say it's faster than using new but this doesn't make sense; at some point, regardless of how the new object is created, memory needs to be allocated for it.

Doesn't this pattern run in the same circles as the 'chicken or egg' problem? Since the Prototype pattern essentially is just cloning objects, at some point the original object must be created itself (i.e. not cloned). This would mean that I need to have an existing copy of every object I want to clone already ready to clone?

Can anyone explain what the use of this pattern is?

  • 3
    This question might be better suited for Programmers StackExchange since its more a conceptual question about programming – WebChemist Dec 14 '12 at 23:48
  • Learning design patterns in school! – AliN11 Sep 15 at 17:24
up vote 23 down vote accepted

The Prototype pattern is a creation pattern based on cloning a pre-configured object. The idea is that you pick an object that is configured for either the default or in the ballpark of some specific use case and then you clone this object and configure to your exact needs.

The pattern is useful to remove a bunch of boilerplate code, when the configuration required would be onerous. I think of Prototypes as a preset object, where you save a bunch of state as a new starting point.

  • 1
    'duck-typing and multiple inheritance on platforms that don't natively support such things'. Good point. But still leaves the annoying problem of needing an original object to clone. – user1905391 Dec 14 '12 at 23:46
  • 1
    So then, back to the original question, what's the point? How do you solve the chicken/egg problem? The GoF book describes the idea of a Prototype Manager, but fails to give enough concrete details on how it could possibly work (if a class is registered with the manager at runtime, then how can you avoid having clients of the manager do explicit casts on the returned cloned instance?) – Adam Parkin Feb 21 '13 at 21:16
  • @Mark, can you address the chicken-or-egg problem which seems to be the heart of the question? – jaco0646 Feb 22 '17 at 14:36
  • Prototype is "Clone this object and make minor changes". It's true that you still have to create the original object. That's not what this creation method is trying to solve, rather it is addressing the case where you have a few highly configured objects that can serve as a starting point. Similar to a preset for a stereo or a synthesizer. – Mark Pauley Feb 28 '17 at 19:22
  • Further, there are languages (Javascript) where there is strictly speaking no other way to make what we normally consider to be an "object", i.e. a new / separate instance of encapsulated data married to accessors or methods. – Mark Pauley Feb 28 '17 at 19:24

The prototype pattern has some benefits, for example:

  • It eliminates the (potentially expensive) overhead of initializing an object
  • It simplifies and can optimize the use case where multiple objects of the same type will have mostly the same data

For example, say your program uses objects that are created from data parsed from motley unchanging information retrieved over the network. Rather than retrieving the data and re-parsing it each time a new object is created, the prototype pattern can be used to simply duplicate the original object whenever a new one is needed.

Also, say that object may have data that uses up large amounts of memory, such as data representing images. Memory can be reduced by using a copy-on-write style inheritance, where the original, unduplicated data is shown until the code attempts to change that data. Then, the new data will mask to reference to the original data.

  • 6
    Nitpicking (I gave a +1), but I think point #1 is a bit strongly worded. It potentially reduces the overhead of initializing an object. In many cases complex initialization code cannot be avoided, in which case the pattern buys you nothing. I'd also be reluctant to encourage the idea that a cloned object could share data with other clones. The typical idea is that clones should be independent, so unless you're careful you can easily break that relationship if you share (not copy) state amongst clones. – Adam Parkin Feb 21 '13 at 21:22
  • Good answer! Only your second use case violates the convention suggested in the Java API ("By convention, the object returned by this method should be independent of this object (which is being cloned).", see docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#clone()) – robert Feb 10 '16 at 14:46
  • this should be the answer – Hristo Yankov Mar 14 '16 at 21:23

Many of the other answers here talk about the cost savings of cloning an already-configured object, but I would like to expand on the other "point" of the Prototype pattern. In some languages, where classes are treated as first-class objects, you can configure what type of object gets created by a client at runtime by simply passing it the class name. In languages like C++, where classes are not treated as first-class objects, the Prototype pattern allows you to achieve the same effect.

For example, let's say we have a Chef in a restaurant whose job is to make and serve meals. Let's say the Chef is underpaid and disgruntled, so he makes dishes like the following:

class Chef {
    public:
        void prepareMeal() const {
            MozzarellaSticksWithKetchup* appetizer = new MozzarellaSticksWithKetchup();
            // do something with appetizer...

            HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFries* entree = new HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFries();
            // do something with entree...

            FreezerBurnedIceCream* dessert = new FreezerBurnedIceCream();
            // do something with dessert...
        }
};

Now let's say we want to change the Chef to be an ostentatious celebrity chef. This means he/she has to new different dishes in prepareMeal(). We would like to modify the method so that the types of meals that get new by the Chef can be specified as parameters. In other languages where classes are first class objects, we can simply pass the class names as parameters to the method. We can't do this in C++, so we can benefit from the prototype pattern:

class Appetizer {
    public:
        virtual Appetizer* clone() const = 0;
        // ...
};

class Entree {
    public:
        virtual Entree* clone() const = 0;
        // ...
};

class Dessert {
    public:
        virtual Dessert* clone() const = 0;
        // ...
};

class MozzarellaSticksWithKetchup : public Appetizer {
    public:
        virtual Appetizer* clone() const override { return new MozzarellaSticksWithKetchup(*this); }
        // ...
};

class HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFries : public Entree {
    public:
        virtual Entree * clone() const override { return new HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFries(*this); }
        // ...
};

class FreezerBurnedIceCream : public Dessert {
    public:
        virtual Dessert * clone() const override { return new FreezerBurnedIceCream(*this); }
        // ...
};

// ...and so on for any other derived Appetizers, Entrees, and Desserts.

class Chef {
    public:
        void prepareMeal(Appetizer* appetizer_prototype, Entree* entree_prototype, Dessert* dessert_prototype) const {
            Appetizer* appetizer = appetizer_prototype->clone();
            // do something with appetizer...

            Entree* entree = entree_prototype->clone();
            // do something with entree...

            Dessert* dessert = dessert_prototype->clone();
            // do something with dessert...
        }
};

Note that a clone() method creates an instance of the derived type, but returns a pointer to the parent type. This means we can change the type of object that gets created by using a different derived type, and the client won't know the difference. This design now allows us to configure a Chef -- the client of our Prototypes -- to make different types of dishes at runtime:

Chef chef;

// The same underpaid chef from before:
MozzarellaSticksWithKetchup mozzarella_sticks;
HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFries hamburger;
FreezerBurnedIceCream ice_cream;
chef.prepareMeal(&mozzarella_sticks, &hamburger, &ice_cream);

// An ostentatious celebrity chef:
IranianBelugaCaviar caviar;
LobsterFrittataWithFarmFreshChives lobster;
GoldDustedChocolateCupcake cupcake;
chef.prepareMeal(&caviar, &lobster, &cupcake);

You may wonder that used this way, the Prototype pattern buys you the same thing as the Factory Method pattern, so why not just use that? Because the Factory Method pattern would require a hierarchy of creator classes that mirror the hierarchy of products being created; i.e. we would need a MozzarellaSticksWithKetchupCreator with a make() method, a HockeyPuckHamburgerWithSoggyFriesCreator with a make() method, and so on. You could, therefore, view the Prototype pattern simply as one way to alleviate the code redundancy often introduced by the Factory Method pattern.

This argument is drawn from Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, a.k.a. the "Gang of Four" book.

If you want to create an object but do not want to go through the expensive object creation procedure where network or database calls are made, then use the prototype pattern. Just create a copy of the object and do your changes on it.

Compared with the abstract factory pattern, by using the prototype pattern, you don't have to have a big factory hierarchy, just a big product hierarchy.

If you have a requirement, where you need to populate or use the same data containing Object repeatable

and

it is not possible to build from existing Object for example [ Building Object using Network Stream ] or

to build an Object is time-consuming [Building a Big Object, by getting data from Database] then use this design pattern, as in this a Copy the existing Object is created, this copy would be different from the Original Object and could be used just like Original one.

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