384

I want to take two lists and find the values that appear in both.

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]

returnMatches(a, b)

would return [5], for instance.

  • 4
    The answers below all seem wrong to me. What happens if a number is repeated in either list, surely you'd want to know that (?) (eg., say both lists have '5' twice) Any solution using sets will immediately remove all repeated items and you'll lose that info. – M.H. Mar 25 '19 at 0:32
  • Possible duplicate of How to find list intersection? – Kushan Gunasekera Jul 12 '19 at 17:30

19 Answers 19

495
1

Not the most efficient one, but by far the most obvious way to do it is:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
>>> set(a) & set(b)
{5}

if order is significant you can do it with list comprehensions like this:

>>> [i for i, j in zip(a, b) if i == j]
[5]

(only works for equal-sized lists, which order-significance implies).

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  • 15
    A note of caution, the list comprehension is not necessarily the faster option. For larger sets (where performance is most likely to matter) the bitwise comparison (&) or set(a).intersection(b) will be as fast or faster than list comprehension. – Joshmaker Jun 3 '12 at 17:00
  • 24
    Another note of caution: the list comprehension finds the values that appear in both at the SAME positions (this is what SilentGhost meant by "order is significant"). The set intersection solutions will also find matches at DIFFERENT positions. These are answers to 2 quite different questions... (the op's question is ambiguous as to which it is asking) – drevicko Nov 24 '13 at 22:58
  • How do you do this if your lists are lists of lists i.e. a = [[0,0], [1,0]] and b = [[2,3],[0,0]] – Schneems Mar 12 '17 at 21:18
  • 3
    What would be the time complexity of the first example set(a) & set(b) ? – AdjunctProfessorFalcon May 19 '17 at 1:56
  • Note, this does not work if both sets are empty and you expect comparison to pass. So change to "(set(a) and set(b)) or (not a and not b)" – Neil McGill Oct 2 '19 at 19:40
396
2

Use set.intersection(), it's fast and readable.

>>> set(a).intersection(b)
set([5])
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  • 28
    This answer has good algorithmic performance, as only one of the lists (shorter should be preferred) is turned into a set for quick lookup, and the other list is traversed looking up its items in the set. – u0b34a0f6ae Sep 7 '09 at 12:08
  • 19
    bool(set(a).intersection(b)) for True or False – Akshay Oct 20 '17 at 3:20
  • 6
    This answer is more flexible and readable, since people may need difference or union. – Shihe Zhang Nov 1 '17 at 2:31
  • What if I have objects as list elements and only want partial matches, i.e., only some attributes have to match for it to be considered as matching object? – CGFoX Mar 22 '18 at 20:39
  • Is there any performance difference for .intersection() vs &? – brandonbanks Aug 7 '19 at 13:57
109
1

A quick performance test showing Lutz's solution is the best:

import time

def speed_test(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        t1 = time.time()
        for x in xrange(5000):
            results = func(*args, **kwargs)
        t2 = time.time()
        print '%s took %0.3f ms' % (func.func_name, (t2-t1)*1000.0)
        return results
    return wrapper

@speed_test
def compare_bitwise(x, y):
    set_x = frozenset(x)
    set_y = frozenset(y)
    return set_x & set_y

@speed_test
def compare_listcomp(x, y):
    return [i for i, j in zip(x, y) if i == j]

@speed_test
def compare_intersect(x, y):
    return frozenset(x).intersection(y)

# Comparing short lists
a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
compare_bitwise(a, b)
compare_listcomp(a, b)
compare_intersect(a, b)

# Comparing longer lists
import random
a = random.sample(xrange(100000), 10000)
b = random.sample(xrange(100000), 10000)
compare_bitwise(a, b)
compare_listcomp(a, b)
compare_intersect(a, b)

These are the results on my machine:

# Short list:
compare_bitwise took 10.145 ms
compare_listcomp took 11.157 ms
compare_intersect took 7.461 ms

# Long list:
compare_bitwise took 11203.709 ms
compare_listcomp took 17361.736 ms
compare_intersect took 6833.768 ms

Obviously, any artificial performance test should be taken with a grain of salt, but since the set().intersection() answer is at least as fast as the other solutions, and also the most readable, it should be the standard solution for this common problem.

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  • Set is actually removing repetitions, so in my case wont work – rgralma Mar 6 at 8:23
  • @rgralma making a new set from an existing list won't remove anything from the original list. If you want special logic to handle duplicates within a list, I think you'll need to ask a new question because the answer will need to be specific to how you want duplicates to be handled. – Joshmaker Mar 25 at 17:11
67
0

I prefer the set based answers, but here's one that works anyway

[x for x in a if x in b]
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15
0

The easiest way to do that is to use sets:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
>>> set(a) & set(b)
set([5])
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15
0

Quick way:

list(set(a).intersection(set(b)))
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14
0
>>> s = ['a','b','c']   
>>> f = ['a','b','d','c']  
>>> ss= set(s)  
>>> fs =set(f)  
>>> print ss.intersection(fs)   
   **set(['a', 'c', 'b'])**  
>>> print ss.union(fs)        
   **set(['a', 'c', 'b', 'd'])**  
>>> print ss.union(fs)  - ss.intersection(fs)   
   **set(['d'])**
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  • 1
    The accepted answer does not work for lists that contain strings. This one does. – Antony Jan 25 '18 at 16:18
12
0

Also you can try this,by keeping common elements in a new list.

new_list = []
for element in a:
    if element in b:
        new_list.append(element)
| improve this answer | |
6
0

another a bit more functional way to check list equality for list 1 (lst1) and list 2 (lst2) where objects have depth one and which keeps the order is:

all(i == j for i, j in zip(lst1, lst2))   
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5
0

Do you want duplicates? If not maybe you should use sets instead:


>>> set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]).intersection(set([9, 8, 7, 6, 5]))
set([5])
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4
0

You can use

def returnMatches(a,b):
       return list(set(a) & set(b))
| improve this answer | |
4
0

You can use:

a = [1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 6, 7, 8]
b = [1, 7, 0, 9]
same_values = set(a) & set(b)
print same_values

Output:

set([1, 7, 9])
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  • 4
    how is this different to the accepted answer from 6+ years ago? – tmdavison Jan 6 '16 at 11:12
  • 1
    Well, I wrote the complete detail with output and good for beginner python – Adnan Ghaffar Jan 6 '16 at 13:10
4
0
a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]

lista =set(a)
listb =set(b)   
print listb.intersection(lista)   
returnMatches = set(['5']) #output 

print " ".join(str(return) for return in returnMatches ) # remove the set()   

 5        #final output 
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  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Donald Duck Jul 20 '17 at 0:45
4
0

Can use itertools.product too.

>>> common_elements=[]
>>> for i in list(itertools.product(a,b)):
...     if i[0] == i[1]:
...         common_elements.append(i[0])
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2
0

If you want a boolean value:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
>>> set(b) == set(a)  & set(b) and set(a) == set(a) & set(b)
False
>>> a = [3,1,2]
>>> b = [1,2,3]
>>> set(b) == set(a)  & set(b) and set(a) == set(a) & set(b)
True
| improve this answer | |
1
0

The following solution works for any order of list items and also supports both lists to be different length.

import numpy as np
def getMatches(a, b):
    matches = []
    unique_a = np.unique(a)
    unique_b = np.unique(b)
    for a in unique_a:
        for b in unique_b:
            if a == b:
                matches.append(a)
    return matches
print(getMatches([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 9])) # displays [5]
print(getMatches([1, 2, 3], [3, 4, 5, 1])) # displays [1, 3]
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  • 1
    Numpy has a specific function for that: np.intersect1d(list1, list2) – obchardon Jul 21 '19 at 15:00
0
0

Using __and__ attribute method also works.

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> b = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
>>> set(a).__and__(set(b))
set([5])

or simply

>>> set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]).__and__(set([9, 8, 7, 6, 5]))
set([5])
>>>    
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0
0
you can | for set union and & for set intersection.
for example:

    set1={1,2,3}
    set2={3,4,5}
    print(set1&set2)
    output=3

    set1={1,2,3}
    set2={3,4,5}
    print(set1|set2)
    output=1,2,3,4,5

curly braces in the answer.
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  • 4
    The question was for list and no set. use of the & operator on set is already answer by SilentGhost in the accepted answer – dWinder Jul 18 '18 at 19:34
0
0

I just used the following and it worked for me:

group1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
group2 = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]

for k in group1:
    for v in group2:
        if k == v:
            print(k)

this would then print 5 in your case. Probably not great performance wise though.

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