10

Possible Duplicate:
Listing all permutations of a string/integer

For example,

aaa .. aaz .. aba .. abz .. aca .. acz .. azz .. baa .. baz .. bba .. bbz .. zzz

Basically, imagine counting binary but instead of going from 0 to 1, it goes from a to z.

I have been trying to get this working for a few hours now to no avail and the formula is getting quite complex and I'm not sure if there's a simpler way to do it.

Thanks for reading.

Edit: I have something like this at the moment but it's not quite there and I'm not sure if there is a better way:

private IEnumerable<string> GetWordsOfLength(int length)
{
    char letterA = 'a', letterZ = 'z';

    StringBuilder currentLetters = new StringBuilder(new string(letterA, length));
    StringBuilder endingLetters = new StringBuilder(new string(letterZ, length));

    int currentIndex = length - 1;

    while (currentLetters.ToString() != endingLetters.ToString())
    {
        yield return currentLetters.ToString();

        for (int i = length - 1; i > 0; i--)
        {
            if (currentLetters[i] == letterZ)
            {
                for (int j = i; j < length; j++)
                {
                    currentLetters[j] = letterA;
                }

                if (currentLetters[i - 1] != letterZ)
                {
                    currentLetters[i - 1]++;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                currentLetters[i]++;

                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

marked as duplicate by T.J. Crowder, Peter O., Frank van Puffelen, Jerry Coffin, Soner Gönül Dec 15 '12 at 15:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

30

For a variable amount of letter combinations, you can do the following:

var alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
var q = alphabet.Select(x => x.ToString());
int size = 4;
for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
    q = q.SelectMany(x => alphabet, (x, y) => x + y);

foreach (var item in q)
    Console.WriteLine(item);
  • I know this is pretty old but you could have used LINQ to print out the array. q.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine(x)); – asdfasdfadsf Oct 20 '16 at 23:02
  • 1
    @JasonHeddle There is no ForEach extension for IEnumerable. – Magnus Oct 21 '16 at 7:35
  • then all you would have to do is add .ToArray() before the .Foreach, like so: q.ToArray().ForEach(Console.WriteLine); – asdfasdfadsf Oct 21 '16 at 11:33
  • 2
    @JasonHeddle - ForEach method is specific for List<T>. What is the problem with this foreach? – Rahul Singh Apr 26 '17 at 7:31
14
var alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
//or var alphabet = Enumerable.Range('a', 'z' - 'a' + 1).Select(i => (char)i);

var query = from a in alphabet
            from b in alphabet
            from c in alphabet
            select "" + a + b + c;

foreach (var item in query)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}

__EDIT__

For a general solution, you can use the CartesianProduct here

int N = 4;
var result = Enumerable.Range(0, N).Select(_ => alphabet).CartesianProduct();
foreach (var item in result)
{
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join("",item));
}

// Eric Lippert’s Blog
// Computing a Cartesian Product with LINQ
// http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/06/28/computing-a-cartesian-product-with-linq.aspx
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CartesianProduct<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sequences)
{
    // base case: 
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> result = new[] { Enumerable.Empty<T>() };
    foreach (var sequence in sequences)
    {
        var s = sequence; // don't close over the loop variable 
        // recursive case: use SelectMany to build the new product out of the old one 
        result =
            from seq in result
            from item in s
            select seq.Concat(new[] { item });
    }
    return result;
}
  • I'm surprised but yes, this works. – Carra Dec 15 '12 at 10:02
  • 2
    I thought of something like this but what if I have a variable amount of possible letter combinations? I just used 3 as an example. Might need to be 4 or 5 – Ryan Peschel Dec 15 '12 at 10:02
  • @RyanPeschel than use CartesianProduct here giving it n alphabet. – L.B Dec 15 '12 at 10:09
5

Here's a very simple solution:

for(char first = 'a'; first <= (int)'z'; first++)
    for(char second = 'a'; second <= (int)'z'; second++)
        for(char third = 'a'; third <= (int)'z'; third++)
            Console.WriteLine(first.ToString() + second + third);
4

You have 26^3 counts for 3 "digits". Just iterate from 'a' to 'z' in three loops.

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