0

I have this code:

int a;
printf("&a = %u\n",(unsigned)&a);
printf("a\n");
printf("b\n");
printf("c\n");
printf("d\n");

I tried to print the pointer of a variable.
But it fail on the row printf("a\n"); and says Segmentation fault (core dumped)
Output:

&a = 134525024
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

When I remove the row printf("&a = %u\n",(unsigned)&a); from the code, its success. Output:

a
b
c
d

What worng in my code?

12
  • 1
    Is it your whole source code? – md5 Dec 15 '12 at 16:55
  • 1
    Nothing wrong in what you've shown. – Daniel Fischer Dec 15 '12 at 16:56
  • 1
    Use %p to print pointer value, instead of %u. – Rohan Dec 15 '12 at 16:57
  • @Rohan It's cast to unsigned, so %u is correct (though %p and a cast to void* would be more informative). – Daniel Fischer Dec 15 '12 at 16:59
  • 1
    Did you #include <stdio.h>? Did you add -Wall to your compilation options (or, what happens when you do)? You'd do best with also including #include <inttypes.h> and using printf("%a = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", (uintptr_t)&a); as (on all systems where uintptr_t is defined) the result is guaranteed not to truncate any digits (whereas casting to int, unsigned, long, unsigned long, even unsigned long long is not guaranteed to do so). That is a C99 header, but it's in Linux OK. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 15 '12 at 18:34
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This could be an architecture problem. I ran this on OS X and it ran fine:

#import <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a;
    printf("&a = %u\n",(unsigned int)&a);
    printf("a\n");
    printf("b\n");
    printf("c\n");
    printf("d\n");
}

However, I did get a warning during compilation:

warning: cast from pointer to integer of different size

I am on a 64-bit machine, so my 64-bit pointers can't fit into a 32-bit int. Try running this instead and see what you get:

#import <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a;
    printf("unsigned %ld\n", sizeof(unsigned)); // sizes reported in bytes
    printf("int %ld\n", sizeof(int));           // same as unsigned
    printf("long %ld\n", sizeof(long));         // should fit a pointer
    printf("ptr %ld\n", sizeof(void*));         // size of a pointer
    printf("&a = %lu\n", (unsigned long)&a);    // should print out your pointer
    printf("&a = %p\n", &a);                    // the Right Way of doing things
}

Output:

unsigned 4
int 4
long 8
ptr 8
&a = 140734544742408
&a = 0x7fff508c0808

EDIT:

Just in case you didn't know, unsigned actually means unsigned int. Likewise, long actually means long int.

Also, whether a value is signed or unsigned does not change its physical size, only how it is interpreted. You can see that from the first 2 prints.

4
  • Its also not working for me... I use vmware to simulate ubuntu – nrofis Dec 15 '12 at 17:35
  • Are you getting any compile warnings? gcc -o test test.c – user1902824 Dec 15 '12 at 17:36
  • Yes, my compiler understands that directive. Sorry for stepping outside C. #import is roughly the same as #include with include guards built in. At any rate, if it was a problem, it would be a compile time problem. – user1902824 Dec 16 '12 at 0:40
  • #import is Objective-C. – Jim Balter May 11 '14 at 18:50
0

I solvd my problem. I just reinstall my ubuntu and the vmware, now its work. I am not realy sure what the exact problem, but it solved my problem... :-)

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