19

Similar to this question just in C# instead of JavaScript. I couldn't find anything for C# while searching

I have a text box that will take a quantity, which is later stored as a double in a database. However it is possible that some quantities will be entered as string fractions e.g 1/2 for 0.5. I want to be able to convert these to decimal before storing them to the database (being able to also convert back would be nice but not necessary). I want to be able to handle both fractions and mixed numbers e.g. 2 1/2 is saved as 2.5

Anybody know a way of doing this?

2
15

Try splitting it on the space and slash, something like:

double FractionToDouble(string fraction) {
    double result;

    if(double.TryParse(fraction, out result)) {
        return result;
    }

    string[] split = fraction.Split(new char[] { ' ', '/' });

    if(split.Length == 2 || split.Length == 3) {
        int a, b;

        if(int.TryParse(split[0], out a) && int.TryParse(split[1], out b)) {
            if(split.Length == 2) {
                return (double)a / b;
            }

            int c;

            if(int.TryParse(split[2], out c)) {
                return a + (double)b / c;
            }
        }
    }

    throw new FormatException("Not a valid fraction.");
}

Hey, it worked! Remember to check for a division by zero, too. You'll get Infinity, -Infinity, or NaN as a result.

4
  • 2
    Thank you very much! Just implemented this into my app and it works perfectly.
    – J.B
    Dec 16 '12 at 18:09
  • Why do we need to use a delimiter ' ' (the space)? @U2744 SNOWFLAKE
    – Don Larynx
    Dec 30 '14 at 18:26
  • Also doesn't simply using the following line work? it outputs correctly. double frac = (double)1/8;
    – Don Larynx
    Dec 30 '14 at 18:32
  • @DonLarynx: This is a function to parse a string (e.g. user input). You wouldn’t use it as a constant expression in your program. The space delimiter is for mixed fractions, e.g. 1 1/2.
    – Ry-
    Dec 30 '14 at 20:16
9

And here is yet one more solution, but with a bit more seamless an integration:

public class FractionalNumber
{
    public Double Result
    {
        get { return this.result; }
        private set { this.result = value; }
    }
    private Double result;

    public FractionalNumber(String input)
    {
        this.Result = this.Parse(input);
    }

    private Double Parse(String input)
    {
        input = (input ?? String.Empty).Trim();
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("input");
        }

        // standard decimal number (e.g. 1.125)
        if (input.IndexOf('.') != -1 || (input.IndexOf(' ') == -1 && input.IndexOf('/') == -1 && input.IndexOf('\\') == -1))
        {
            Double result;
            if (Double.TryParse(input, out result))
            {
                return result;
            }
        }

        String[] parts = input.Split(new[] { ' ', '/', '\\' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

        // stand-off fractional (e.g. 7/8)
        if (input.IndexOf(' ') == -1 && parts.Length == 2)
        {
            Double num, den;
            if (Double.TryParse(parts[0], out num) && Double.TryParse(parts[1], out den))
            {
                return num / den;
            }
        }

        // Number and fraction (e.g. 2 1/2)
        if (parts.Length == 3)
        {
            Double whole, num, den;
            if (Double.TryParse(parts[0], out whole) && Double.TryParse(parts[1], out num) && Double.TryParse(parts[2], out den))
            {
                return whole + (num / den);
            }
        }

        // Bogus / unable to parse
        return Double.NaN;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Result.ToString();
    }

    public static implicit operator Double(FractionalNumber number)
    {
        return number.Result;
    }
}

And because it implements the implicit operator, it can be used simply by:

Double number = new FractionalNumber("3 1/2");

Anything that can't be parsed returns the Double constant Double.NaN. Without getting in to a laundry list of possible inputs, this worked with some basics. Feel free to tweak the class to fit your needs.

1

Split the string on the "/" then divide the two numbers.

public float FractionToDecimal(String input)
{
    String[] fraction = input.Split(new[] { "/" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
    if (fraction.Length != 2)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    Int32 numerator, denominator;
    if (Int32.TryParse(fraction[0], out numerator) && Int32.TryParse(fraction[1], out denominator))
    {
        if (denominator == 0)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Divide by 0 occurred");
        }
        return (float)numerator / denominator;
    }
    throw new ArgumentException();
}
0
1

You might try something like this: http://csharpeval.codeplex.com/ or this: https://github.com/Giorgi/Math-Expression-Evaluator

Both libraries are full mathematical expression evaluators written in C#. They're probably overkill for your use case, but worth mentioning for the benefit of others.

-2
decimal re = (decimal)1/7;

works for me.

2
  • 1
    The compiler can do this because those are numeric literals, and the / forms a math expression. (decimal)"1/7" will fail miserably. Dec 30 '14 at 19:59
  • That's true. I just ignored "text" in text fraction, I apologize. Run the function "fractiontodouble" by another user, first, but alter it so it's fractiontodecimal.
    – Don Larynx
    Dec 30 '14 at 21:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.