54

I need to write a custom batch File renamer. I've got the bulk of it done except I can't figure out how to check if a file is already open. I'm just using the java.io.File package and there is a canWrite() method but that doesn't seem to test if the file is in use by another program. Any ideas on how I can make this work?

4
  • This is platform-dependent. What platform is this for?
    – skaffman
    Sep 7, 2009 at 18:54
  • Just retagged your question cause you might have to do that by calling the WinAPI using JNI or JNA. Sep 7, 2009 at 19:14
  • 1
    possibly, but let's not jump the gun
    – skaffman
    Sep 7, 2009 at 19:56
  • 1
    Even if you can tell it's open, there would be a race conditioon to do anything with it. Sep 7, 2009 at 21:04

8 Answers 8

25

Using the Apache Commons IO library...

boolean isFileUnlocked = false;
try {
    org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.touch(yourFile);
    isFileUnlocked = true;
} catch (IOException e) {
    isFileUnlocked = false;
}

if(isFileUnlocked){
    // Do stuff you need to do with a file that is NOT locked.
} else {
    // Do stuff you need to do with a file that IS locked
}
3
  • 3
    This doesn't throw any sort of exception for a .xls file, touches it just fine.
    – WillBD
    Sep 2, 2014 at 12:46
  • 21
    Race condition alert!
    – Stephen C
    Oct 21, 2014 at 22:24
  • 1
    This would change the last modified date and time of the file.
    – ssp
    Nov 8, 2016 at 17:19
13

(The Q&A is about how to deal with Windows "open file" locks ... not how implement this kind of locking portably.)

This whole issue is fraught with portability issues and race conditions:

  • You could try to use FileLock, but it is not necessarily supported for your OS and/or filesystem.
  • It appears that on Windows you may be unable to use FileLock if another application has opened the file in a particular way.
  • Even if you did manage to use FileLock or something else, you've still got the problem that something may come in and open the file between you testing the file and doing the rename.

A simpler though non-portable solution is to just try the rename (or whatever it is you are trying to do) and diagnose the return value and / or any Java exceptions that arise due to opened files.

Notes:

  1. If you use the Files API instead of the File API you will get more information in the event of a failure.

  2. On systems (e.g. Linux) where you are allowed to rename a locked or open file, you won't get any failure result or exceptions. The operation will just succeed. However, on such systems you generally don't need to worry if a file is already open, since the OS doesn't lock files on open.

0
12
    //  TO CHECK WHETHER A FILE IS OPENED 
    //  OR NOT (not for .txt files)

    //  the file we want to check
    String fileName = "C:\\Text.xlsx";
    File file = new File(fileName);

    // try to rename the file with the same name
    File sameFileName = new File(fileName);

    if(file.renameTo(sameFileName)){
        // if the file is renamed
        System.out.println("file is closed");    
    }else{
        // if the file didnt accept the renaming operation
        System.out.println("file is opened");
    }
3
  • 2
    Simply genius! +1. Feb 16, 2017 at 12:41
  • 5
    Will not work for Linux. In POSIX file systems file name is not primary key but link to file content. So you can rename or delete opened file. No one get any errors.
    – dev.brutus
    Apr 1, 2017 at 15:30
  • 3
    Can confirm this works for Windows10. Seems much more elegant than provoking an exception. Does not work on linux with ext4. Apr 13, 2017 at 7:45
9

On Windows I found the answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/13706972/3014879 using

fileIsLocked = !file.renameTo(file)

most useful, as it avoids false positives when processing write protected (or readonly) files.

1
  • Thank you. This is the most efficient and right answer.
    – Dan Ortega
    Oct 17, 2018 at 17:37
3

org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.touch(yourFile) doesn't check if your file is open or not. Instead, it changes the timestamp of the file to the current time.

I used IOException and it works just fine:

try 
{
  String filePath = "C:\sheet.xlsx";
  FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(filePath );                
}
catch (IOException e)
{
    System.out.println("File is open");
}
2
  • Using exceptions for normal control flow is considered a poor practice. Additionally, you might end up leaving fw open in the case which doesn't generate an exception. Aug 30, 2017 at 21:51
  • for that I could use finally so the file will be closed either ways FileWriter fw; try { String filePath = "C:\sheet.xlsx"; fw = new FileWriter(filePath ); } catch (IOException e) { System.out.println("File is open"); } finally { fw.close(); }
    – Ali
    Sep 13, 2017 at 19:59
1

I don't think you'll ever get a definitive solution for this, the operating system isn't necessarily going to tell you if the file is open or not.

You might get some mileage out of java.nio.channels.FileLock, although the javadoc is loaded with caveats.

1
  • Yeah, there is no guarantee that the underlying OS, or even file system, supports file locks in any reasonable way.
    – aperkins
    Sep 7, 2009 at 19:22
1

Hi I really hope this helps.

I tried all the options before and none really work on Windows. The only think that helped me accomplish this was trying to move the file. Event to the same place under an ATOMIC_MOVE. If the file is being written by another program or Java thread, this definitely will produce an Exception.

 try{

      Files.move(Paths.get(currentFile.getPath()), 
               Paths.get(currentFile.getPath()), StandardCopyOption.ATOMIC_MOVE);

      // DO YOUR STUFF HERE SINCE IT IS NOT BEING WRITTEN BY ANOTHER PROGRAM

 } catch (Exception e){

      // DO NOT WRITE THEN SINCE THE FILE IS BEING WRITTEN BY ANOTHER PROGRAM

 }
-3

If file is in use FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(file); returns java.io.FileNotFoundException with 'The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process' in the exception message.

3
  • 1
    I would appreciate comments on the reasons for the downvotes
    – Aikerima
    Apr 5, 2017 at 11:39
  • 2
    Overwrote the file's content with zero bytes if the file was not in use, so it basically deleted the file. Applies to linux (ext4) and Win10. Third downvote was mine. Apr 13, 2017 at 7:41
  • I have this exception when i use FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(file) Sep 2, 2017 at 15:19

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