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I wanted to 'protect' a certain window from closing. So I wanted to hook WM_CLOSE, WM_DESTOY or WM_QUIT. And this is what I tried to do so:

LRESULT CALLBACK WindowHookProc(int nCode, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    if (nCode >= 0)
    {
        MSG* msg = (MSG*)lParam;
        //if (msg->hwnd == GetForegroundWindow())
        {
            if (msg->message == WM_CLOSE || msg->message == WM_QUIT || msg->message == WM_DESTROY)
            {
                //MessageBox(0, "TEST", "", 0);
                msg->message = 0;
                CallNextHookEx(hMsg, nCode, (WPARAM)NULL, (LPARAM)NULL);
                return TRUE;
            }
        }
    }

    CallNextHookEx(hMsg, nCode, wParam, lParam);
}

I tried:

  • Returning TRUE or FALSE
  • Calling CallNextHookEx with NULL as LPARAM or editing the msg->message to 0

Also what I noticed, if I hook WH_GETMESSAGE it doesn't 'block' the message loop. But it does so with hooking WH_CALLWNDPROC. I discovered this with prompting a messagebox when the msg->message equals to WM_CLOSE.

Thanks in advance, Regards.

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  • So if Windows is sending your app a message to shut it down you will ignore it?
    – ZippyV
    Dec 17 '12 at 13:47
  • @ZippyV Yes on a specific hWnd that I 'protect'. I want to protect a window from clicking the close button. I'm not sure I need to block WM_QUIT and WM_DESTROY as well. But I just tried it.
    – joell
    Dec 17 '12 at 13:58
  • 1
    WM_DESTROY just notifies you that the window is about to be destroyed (DestroyWindow() has been called), nothing can be done to prevent it. WM_QUIT notifies that the current message loop is to be exited, not usually sent to windows, but to threads (usually with PostQuitMessage()). You are right about WM_CLOSE, though: it is called when the user clicks the close button (or presses Alt-F4), and the default implementation just calls DestroyWindow().
    – rodrigo
    Dec 17 '12 at 14:05
  • Can you explain why you need to "protect" this window? I can't think of any good reasons why you would ever need to attempt this. Dec 17 '12 at 14:19
  • @AdrianMcCarthy Its not really malicious, its not I going to implent to a RAT or something, its just a personal protection application.
    – joell
    Dec 18 '12 at 7:39
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WH_GETMESSAGE installs a hook for messages that are retrieved from the message queue. It does allow you to modify the message. But the problem is that WM_CLOSE is not posted to the message queue with PostMessage(), it is sent with SendMessage(). This hook can't see it.

WH_CALLWNDPROC installs a hook that runs just before the window procedure is called. Which will allow you to see WM_CLOSE. However, you are not allowed to modify the message or make it disappear.

There is no hook that allows you to do what you want to do. Instead you have to sub-class the window procedure. So that your own custom window procedure is called before the window's own procedure. Now you can simply filter WM_CLOSE by just not calling the old window procedure.

Beware that you still need the same kind of plumbing that SetWindowsHookEx() provides, you still need to inject a DLL with your window procedure into the process. Best way is to still use SetWindowsHookEx to get that done with a dummy hook that doesn't otherwise do anything.

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  • How would I subclass? A friend show me how to, but the problem we both have is how to get the original proc address to return to. Because subclassing overwrites all other WM_* so how do I return it to its original procedure?
    – joell
    Dec 18 '12 at 7:39
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Instead of trying to install a hook, just subclass the window and have your subclass WndProc ignore the WM_CLOSE while forwarding all the other messages.

You can't and shouldn't try to stop WM_QUIT. As rodrigo pointed out, you can't do anything about WM_DESTROY. At that point, DestroyWindow has already been called, and your window is going away whether you like it or not.

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