25

I need to use javascript only for this project. Sorry, no jQuery (I feel ashamed as well).

I am adding an addEventListener to a div. "Problem" is that it applies to all its children, too.

Is there a way to avoid this, and have the listener work only for that div?

Thankd in advance.


my code looks like this:

document.getElementById(myObj.id).addEventListener("mousedown", myObjDown, false);

function myObjDown() {
  //do stuff here
}
1
  • 2
    It's not actually adding the event to the children (I'm guessing, since you haven't shown us code). What's happening is the event is bubbling. You want to bind the event in the capturing phase and cancel the bubbling. element1.addEventListener('click',doSomething,true); and event.cancelBubble = true;
    – Shmiddty
    Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 16:59

4 Answers 4

36

You can tell which element the event actually fired on by reading event.target in your callback.

var el = ...
el.addEventListener('click', function(event){
  if (el !== event.target) return;

  // Do your stuff.

}, false);

The other option would be to have handlers bound to the child elements to prevent the event from reaching the parent handler, but that is more work and potentially hides events from things that might actually be listening for them above the parent.

Update

Given your example code, you should be able to do this.

var el = document.getElementById(myObj.id);
el.addEventListener("mousedown", myObjDown, false);

function myObjDown(event) {
  if (el !== event.target) return;

  //do stuff here
}

Also as a general note, keep in mind that none if this will work on IE < 9 because addEventListener is not supported on those.

3
  • please take a look at my edit so you understand how I structured it
    – john smith
    Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 17:04
  • Thanks. I know about the IE thing, it's just that I need to use really simple javascript as per client request. -.- booring
    – john smith
    Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 17:29
  • @johnsmith It's not that bad. I do standard JS all day long :D Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 18:09
22

You can use the currentTarget Event Property

el.addEventListener('click', function(event) {
  if (event.currentTarget !== event.target) {
    return;
  }

  // Do your stuff.
}, false);

More details: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Event/currentTarget

2

Here's an alternative, which keeps your myObjDown function in line with a typical event handler. (using e.target as reference to the event invoking element)

var CssSelector = "div.className";
var elms = document.querySelectorAll(CssSelector);

for (i = 0; i < elms.length; i++) {
    elms[i].addEventListener("mousedown", myObjDown.bind(null, {"target":elms[i]}, false);
}

function myObjDown(e) {
  console.log("event: %o - target: %o", e, e.target);

  var elm = e.target;
  //do stuff here
}

It was suggested that ..

this method could cause memory leaks with versions of some browsers. If anyone experiences this or has any valuable insights. Please comment.


an alternative, in this regard would be

var CssSelector = "div.className";
var elms = document.querySelectorAll(CssSelector);

for (i = 0; i < elms.length; i++) {
    elms[i].addEventListener("mousedown", myObjDown.bind(null, elms[i].id}, false);
}

function myObjDown(id) {
  console.log("element: %o ", document.getElementById(id));

  //do stuff here
}
0

this work for me:

document.getElementById(myObj.id).addEventListener("mousedown", myObjDown, false);

    function myObjDown(e) {
    
     var myTarget= ele.target;  
     while (myTarget!== this) { 
        myTarget= myTarget.parentNode;    //finding correct tag
     }
    
      //do stuff here
    }

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