121

How can I remove duplicates from a PowerShell array?

$a = @(1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8,9,0,0)

10 Answers 10

213

Use Select-Object (whose alias is select) with the -Unique switch; e.g.:

$a = @(1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8,9,0,0)
$a = $a | select -Unique
6
  • 9
    That was too easy :-(. In PowerShell 2 you can also use Get-Unique (or gu) if your array is already sorted.
    – Joey
    Sep 8 '09 at 5:30
  • 2
    Johannes, Get-Unique is available in v1 :)
    – Shay Levy
    Sep 8 '09 at 6:58
  • 3
    cool, this works fine, just a Note, if you want to be concise, it could be shortened even to -u. select -u I would use this on a command line, but written in a code, it's suggested to use the full PS wording: Select-Object -Unique
    – papo
    May 27 '18 at 5:12
  • This only works with single digit? For a large list of array it seems not to works.
    – EagleDev
    Jul 30 '18 at 17:55
  • This isn't working correctly for me, it's only keeping the one value that has a duplicate, almost like it's creating a list of duplicates.
    – Mike Q
    Apr 2 at 21:51
89

Another option is to use Sort-Object (whose alias is sort, but only on Windows) with the
-Unique switch, which combines sorting with removal of duplicates:

$a | sort -unique
4
  • 2
    This also solves my next problem which is how do I sort it. Thanks! May 18 '12 at 16:38
  • 3
    This one also looks a tiny bit faster. May 22 '14 at 18:10
  • Note that this does not preserve order of the elements, e.g. @("B", "a", "A") | sort -unique produces A B.
    – roxton
    Feb 11 at 19:56
  • this is the better answer. select -unique doesn't account for case sensitivity
    – az1d
    Aug 25 at 11:51
18

In case you want to be fully bomb proofed, this is what I would advise:

@('Apples', 'Apples ', 'APPLES', 'Banana') | 
    Sort-Object -Property @{Expression={$_.Trim()}} -Unique

Output:

Apples
Banana

This uses the Property parameter to first Trim() the strings, so extra spaces are removed and then selects only the -Unique values.

More info on Sort-Object:

Get-Help Sort-Object -ShowWindow
1
  • 1
    Awesome answer. Solved my issue, Get-Unique didn't work because spaces Nov 1 '17 at 20:29
8
$a | sort -unique

This works with case-insensitive, therefore removing duplicates strings with differing cases. Solved my problem.

$ServerList = @(
    "FS3",
    "HQ2",
    "hq2"
) | sort -Unique

$ServerList

The above outputs:

FS3
HQ2
1
  • this also works well for arrays with multiple members
    – JoeRod
    Feb 7 '19 at 13:55
5

This is how you get unique from an array with two or more properties. The sort is vital and the key to getting it to work correctly. Otherwise you just get one item returned.

PowerShell Script:

$objects = @(
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "1"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "2"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "3"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "4"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "5"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "1"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "2"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "3"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "4"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "5"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "1"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "2"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "3"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "4"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "5"; MachineName = "1" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "1"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "2"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "3"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "4"; MachineName = "2" }
    [PSCustomObject] @{ Message = "5"; MachineName = "2" }
)

Write-Host "Sorted on both properties with -Unique" -ForegroundColor Yellow
$objects | Sort-Object -Property Message,MachineName -Unique | Out-Host

Write-Host "Sorted on just Message with -Unique" -ForegroundColor Yellow
$objects | Sort-Object -Property Message -Unique | Out-Host

Write-Host "Sorted on just MachineName with -Unique" -ForegroundColor Yellow
$objects | Sort-Object -Property MachineName -Unique | Out-Host

Output:

Sorted on both properties with -Unique

Message MachineName
------- -----------
1       1          
1       2          
2       1          
2       2          
3       1          
3       2          
4       1          
4       2          
5       1          
5       2          


Sorted on just Message with -Unique

Message MachineName
------- -----------
1       1          
2       1          
3       1          
4       1          
5       2          


Sorted on just MachineName with -Unique

Message MachineName
------- -----------
1       1          
3       2  

Source: https://powershell.org/forums/topic/need-to-unique-based-on-multiple-properties/

1
  • For loops that you might not know the header for (ie. parsing automatically some csv data) - use Sort-Object * -unique Jun 15 at 8:25
4

If the list is sorted, you can use the Get-Unique cmdlet:

 $a | Get-Unique
1
  • 2
    It requires the list to be sorted on beforehand Aug 30 '16 at 20:21
2

With my method you can completely remove duplicate values, leaving you with values from the array that only had a count of 1. It was not clear if this is what the OP actually wanted however I was unable to find an example of this solution online so here it is.

$array=@'
Bananna
Apple
Carrot
Pear
Apricot
Pear
Bananna
'@ -split '\r\n'

($array | Group-Object -NoElement | ?{$_.count -eq 1}).Name
1
  • I really like this answer, but there's a big flaw with it. if there are multiple elements with the same name, all those elements are lost, it should instead keep one of them. This fixed it: ($properties | Group-Object -NoElement).Name | Get-Unique
    – az1d
    Aug 25 at 11:57
1

Whether you're using SORT -UNIQUE, SELECT -UNIQUE or GET-UNIQUE from Powershell 2.0 to 5.1, all the examples given are on single Column arrays. I have yet to get this to function across Arrays with multiple Columns to REMOVE Duplicate Rows to leave single occurrences of a Row across said Columns, or develop an alternative script solution. Instead these cmdlets have only returned Rows in an Array that occurred ONCE with singular occurrence and dumped everything that had a duplicate. Typically I have to Remove Duplicates manually from the final CSV output in Excel to finish the report, but sometimes I would like to continue working with said data within Powershell after removing the duplicates.

2
  • this is where the Where-Object comes in handy. You first narrow the list down by using the right where clause, then pipe it to a sort-object, select one or more columsn to sort, and give the sort-object a -unique.
    – LPChip
    Feb 8 '19 at 12:46
  • 1
    @Christopher, please see my post to fix your problem. Consider removing this answer to clean up the solutions.
    – Omzig
    Jan 27 at 17:00
0

To get unique items from an array and preserve their order, you can use .NET HashSet:

$Array = @(1, 3, 1, 2)
$Set = New-Object -TypeName 'System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[int]' -ArgumentList (,[int[]]$Array)

# PS>$Set
# 1
# 3
# 2

Works best with string arrays that contain both uppercase and lowercase items where you need to preserve first occurrence of each item in case-insensitive manner:

$Array = @("B", "b", "a", "A")
$Set = New-Object -TypeName 'System.Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]' -ArgumentList ([string[]]$Array, [StringComparer]::OrdinalIgnoreCase)

# PS>$Set
# B
# a

Works as expected with other types.

Shortened syntax, compatible with PowerShell 5.1 and newer:

$Array = @("B", "b", "a", "A")
$Set = [Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]]::new([string[]]$Array, [StringComparer]::OrdinalIgnoreCase)

$Array = @(1, 3, 1, 2)
$Set = [Collections.Generic.HashSet[int]]::new([int[]]$Array)
0

A lot of the provided answers give buggy results. select -Unqiue is not case sensitive. sort -Unique gives you sorted results, which you might want in the original order.

Will gave a great answer, but it's flawed as it discards all duplicate results but forgets to keep one of them.

This is a version I created that seems to work perfectly. It gives unique results back and retains the original sort order.

($properties | Group-Object -NoElement).Name | Get-Unique

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