0

Here's my code:

total = int(input("How many students are there "))
print("Please enter their scores, between 1 - 100")

myList = []
for i in range (total):
    n = int(input("Enter a test score >> "))

    myList.append(n)

Basically I'm writing a program to calculate test scores but first the user has to enter the scores which are between 0 - 100.

If the user enters a test score out of that range, I want the program to tell the user to rewrite that number. I don't want the program to just end with a error. How can I do that?

  • 1
    Create a helper function that loops forever, calling input() on every loop. When a correct value is input, return it, otherwise print an error and let the loop ask again. – millimoose Dec 17 '12 at 20:35
  • Nobody wants to check that the input is a number? – f p Dec 17 '12 at 20:50
  • 1
    @fp: That's not part of the specification. But it's pretty easy to add, of course. – abarnert Dec 17 '12 at 20:51
6
while True:
   n = int(input("enter a number between 0 and 100: "))
   if 0 <= n <= 100:
      break
   print('try again')

Just like the code in your question, this will work both in Python 2.x and 3.x.

| improve this answer | |
  • He doesn't have to say which he's using; the fact that he's doing int(input pretty much proves it's Py3. – abarnert Dec 17 '12 at 20:47
  • @abarnert: It hints at it, but doesn't prove anything. I only write Python 2.x, yet routinely use parentheses with print(). I'd also write int(input(...)) here, just to make the code future-proof. – NPE Dec 17 '12 at 20:49
  • With all due respect, someone who's clearly a beginner is not being taught to write Python 2 code that usually also works in Python 3; he's being taught to write Python 3 code. – abarnert Dec 17 '12 at 20:51
  • 2
    @abarnert: I think we are debating a trivial, irrelevant issue. I therefore propose that we leave it at that. – NPE Dec 17 '12 at 20:52
2

First, you have to know how to check whether a value is in a range. That's easy:

if n in range(0, 101):

Almost a direct translation from English. (This is only a good solution for Python 3.0 or later, but you're clearly using Python 3.)

Next, if you want to make them keep trying until they enter something valid, just do it in a loop:

for i in range(total):
    while True:
        n = int(input("Enter a test score >> "))
        if n in range(0, 101):
            break
    myList.append(n)

Again, almost a direct translation from English.

But it might be much clearer if you break this out into a separate function:

def getTestScore():
    while True:
        n = int(input("Enter a test score >> "))
        if n in range(0, 101):
            return n

for i in range(total):
    n = getTestScore()
    myList.append(n)

As f p points out, the program will still "just end with a error" if they type something that isn't an integer, such as "A+". Handling that is a bit trickier. The int function will raise a ValueError if you give it a string that isn't a valid representation of an integer. So:

def getTestScore():
    while True:
        try:
            n = int(input("Enter a test score >> "))
        except ValueError:
            pass
        else:
            if n in range(0, 101):
                return n
| improve this answer | |
  • What if the range were from 0 to 1,000,000? Would you compare n to every number in that range? – NPE Dec 17 '12 at 20:37
  • @NPE: Why would you do that? Just n in range(0, 1000001). (In Python 2, you'd want xrange instead of range, of course.) Do you not understand basic Python? – abarnert Dec 17 '12 at 20:38
  • 2
    @NPE As of Python 3, range is a generator-like type that defines a custom __contains__(). It's not a stretch to assume that method is implemented sanely. – millimoose Dec 17 '12 at 20:40
  • 1
    @MarkusUnterwaditzer: And the OP is clearly using Python 3, given the print function and the use of input (instead of raw_input) returning a string. – abarnert Dec 17 '12 at 20:43
  • 3
    @millimoose: In Python 2.7.3, xrange() does have the imagined performance issues. n in xrange(...) iterates over the values. – NPE Dec 17 '12 at 20:43
0

You can use a helper function like:

def input_number(min, max):
    while True:
        n = input("Please enter a number between {} and {}:".format(min, max))
        n = int(n)
        if (min <= n <= max):
            return n
        else:
            print("Bzzt! Wrong.")
| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.