I'd like to use a permissions based system to restrict certain actions within my Django application. These actions need not be related to a particular model (e.g. access to sections in the application, searching...), so I can't use the stock permissions framework directly, because the Permission model requires a reference to an installed content type.

I could write my own permission model but then I'd have to rewrite all the goodies included with the Django permissions, such as:

I've checked some apps like django-authority and django-guardian, but they seem to provide permissions even more coupled to the model system, by allowing per-object permissions.

Is there a way to reuse this framework without having defined any model (besides User and Group) for the project?

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Django's Permission model requires a ContentType instance.

I think one way around it is creating a dummy ContentType that isn't related to any model (the app_label and model fields can be set to any string value).

If you want it all clean and nice, you can create a Permission proxy model that handles all the ugly details of the dummy ContentType and creates "modelless" permission instances. You can also add a custom manager that filters out all Permission instances related to real models.

  • Terrific idea, working like a charm! – Chewie Dec 19 '12 at 10:00
  • 2
    If you don't mind, I'll complete your answer with my implementation. – Chewie Dec 19 '12 at 10:56
  • that'd be awesome Chewie, thanks! – Gonzalo Dec 19 '12 at 11:43
  • Sadly, I cannot approve as I don't have enough reputation to review your edit (it asks me for +2k). Other users are rejecting your edits, so I suggest you add it as another answer (you have my upvote!) Thanks again. – Gonzalo Dec 19 '12 at 11:48
  • That's weird. It really is a completion for your answer, so it makes sense to make it an edit. Anyway, I put it in another answer. – Chewie Dec 19 '12 at 12:10

For those of you, who are still searching:

You can create an auxiliary model with no database table. That model can bring to your project any permission you need. There is no need to deal with ContentType or create Permission objects explicit.

from django.db import models

class RightsSupport(models.Model):

    class Meta:

        managed = False  # No database table creation or deletion operations \
                         # will be performed for this model. 

        permissions = ( 
            ('customer_rigths', 'Global customer rights'),  
            ('vendor_rights', 'Global vendor rights'), 
            ('any_rights', 'Global any rights'), 
        )

Right after manage.py migrate you can use these permissions like any other.

# Decorator

@permission_required('app.customer_rights')
def my_search_view(request):
    …

# Inside a view

def my_search_view(request):
    request.user.has_perm('app.customer_rights')

# In a template
# The currently logged-in user’s permissions are stored in the template variable {{ perms }}

{% if perms.app.customer_rigths %}  
    <p>You can do any customer stuff</p>
{% endif %}
  • that's genius, save my day! – Reorx Sep 3 '16 at 7:51
  • 1
    Nothing changed after i ran manage.py migrate... I don't see any new permissions :( – Agey Dec 8 '16 at 15:05
  • 1
    Did you add your app into your project (INSTALLED_APPS)? – Dmitry Dec 9 '16 at 19:03
  • working like a charm! – Behnam Heydari Jan 22 '17 at 12:28
  • 1
    This answer is perfect. I also []ed default_permissions, raise NotImplementedError on the model's save(), and might consider making has_*_permission() return False if the unmanaged model is truly JUST for this permission. – Douglas Denhartog Jan 8 at 16:25

Following Gonzalo's advice, I used a proxy model and a custom manager to handle my "modelless" permissions with a dummy content type.

from django.db import models
from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission
from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType


class GlobalPermissionManager(models.Manager):
    def get_query_set(self):
        return super(GlobalPermissionManager, self).\
            get_query_set().filter(content_type__name='global_permission')


class GlobalPermission(Permission):
    """A global permission, not attached to a model"""

    objects = GlobalPermissionManager()

    class Meta:
        proxy = True

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        ct, created = ContentType.objects.get_or_create(
            name="global_permission", app_label=self._meta.app_label
        )
        self.content_type = ct
        super(GlobalPermission, self).save(*args, **kwargs)
  • 10
    thanks for the code, it would be nice to also show an example on how to use this code. – Ken Cochrane Mar 19 '13 at 14:14
  • 2
    where should that model permission live? – Mirat Can Bayrak May 28 '13 at 9:00
  • 4
    To create a GlobalPermission: from app.models import GlobalPermission gp = GlobalPermission.objects.create(codename='can_do_it', name='Can do it') Once this is run you can add that permission to users/group like any other permission. – Julien Grenier Feb 7 '14 at 15:06
  • 3
    @JulienGrenier The code breaks in Django 1.8: FieldError: Cannot resolve keyword 'name' into field. Choices are: app_label, id, logentry, model, permission. – maciek Apr 30 '15 at 11:58
  • 2
    Warning: Newer versions of Django (at least 1.10) need to override the method "get_queryset" (note the lack of _ between the words "query" and "set). – Lobe Mar 28 '17 at 4:33

Fix for Chewie's answer in Django 1.8, which as been requested in a few comments.

It says in the release notes:

The name field of django.contrib.contenttypes.models.ContentType has been removed by a migration and replaced by a property. That means it’s not possible to query or filter a ContentType by this field any longer.

So it's the 'name' in reference in ContentType that the uses not in GlobalPermissions.

When I fix it I get the following:

from django.db import models
from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission
from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType


class GlobalPermissionManager(models.Manager):
    def get_queryset(self):
        return super(GlobalPermissionManager, self).\
            get_queryset().filter(content_type__model='global_permission')


class GlobalPermission(Permission):
    """A global permission, not attached to a model"""

    objects = GlobalPermissionManager()

    class Meta:
        proxy = True
        verbose_name = "global_permission"

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        ct, created = ContentType.objects.get_or_create(
            model=self._meta.verbose_name, app_label=self._meta.app_label,
        )
        self.content_type = ct
        super(GlobalPermission, self).save(*args)

The GlobalPermissionManager class is unchanged but included for completeness.

  • 1
    This still doesn't fix it for django 1.8 as in time of syncdb django asserts that the "name" field cannot be null. – Armita Aug 22 '15 at 13:57
  • It worked for me, but I'm not using migrations due to non-django legacy stuff still in my project. Are you upgrading from a previous django, because there isn't supposed to be a name field in 1.8 – rgammans Aug 27 '15 at 11:06

Instead of writing and running this code which inserts records into the database you could just insert the records into your database (obviously editing the primary and foreign keys as needed)

insert into django_content_type(id,name,app_label,model) values (22,'app_permission','myapp','app_permission');
insert into auth_permission(id,name,content_type_id,codename) values (64,'Is Staff Member',22,'staff_member');

And then in your application admin you would have the ability to assign 'Is Staff Member' to your users or groups. To check this permission in your class you would write

from django.contrib.auth.decorators import permission_required
from django.utils.decorators import method_decorator
from django.views.generic import TemplateView

class MyClass(TemplateView):
    template_name = myapp/index.html'

    @method_decorator(permission_required(['myapp.staff_member'],raise_exception=True))
    def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return super(MyClass, self).dispatch(*args, **kwargs)
  • This should not be the ideal way . Ways suggested above are more helpful. – Shrey Jan 6 '17 at 7:21
  • At the very least you should create a migration file and do a proper migration – guival Oct 24 at 14:48

This is alternative solution. First ask yourself: Why not create a Dummy-Model which really exists in DB but never ever gets used, except for holding permissions? That's not nice, but I think it is valid and straight forward solution.

from django.db import models

class Permissions(models.Model):

    can_search_blue_flower = 'my_app.can_search_blue_flower'

    class Meta:
        permissions = [
            ('can_search_blue_flower', 'Allowed to search for the blue flower'),
        ]

Above solution has the benefit, that you can use the variable Permissions.can_search_blue_flower in your source code instead of using the literal string "my_app.can_search_blue_flower". This means less typos and more autocomplete in IDE.

  • Does using managed=False not let you use Permissions.can_search_blue_flower for some reason? – Sam Bobel Mar 8 at 18:52
  • @SamBobel yes, you could be right. I guess I just tried "abstract" the last time. – guettli Mar 9 at 8:41

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