57

I have a number assigned to a variable, like that:

var myVar = 1234;

Now I want to get the second digit (2 in this case) from that number without converting it to a string first. Is that possible?

3
  • //var secondNumber = (myVar-1000)/100;
    – BLOB
    Dec 19, 2012 at 15:34
  • 5
    @BLOB I have never seen a digit with a fraction part ;)
    – Rob W
    Dec 19, 2012 at 15:34
  • 3
    Why without converting it to a string? Dec 19, 2012 at 15:34

14 Answers 14

93

So you want to get the second digit from the decimal writing of a number.

The simplest and most logical solution is to convert it to a string :

var digit = (''+myVar)[1];

or

var digit = myVar.toString()[1];

If you don't want to do it the easy way, or if you want a more efficient solution, you can do that :

var l = Math.pow(10, Math.floor(Math.log(myVar)/Math.log(10))-1);
var b = Math.floor(myVar/l);
var digit = b-Math.floor(b/10)*10;

Demonstration

For people interested in performances, I made a jsperf. For random numbers using the log as I do is by far the fastest solution.

5
  • 16
    The question is how to do it without converting to a string first. Perhaps the OP wants to learn how to do the math. This doesn't answer the question. Dec 19, 2012 at 15:38
  • 9
    @JohnKugelman SO is about practical questions, not puzzles. That's why I first answered it with the simple solution. Now I edited with a solution which doesn't involve a conversion to string. Dec 19, 2012 at 15:40
  • 8
    Learning how to manipulate integers is quite practical. How do you think integers are converted to strings in the first place? Also your mathematical solution yields 7 for 123456789. Dec 19, 2012 at 15:45
  • @JohnKugelman I made an answer for numbers with more digits. See edit. Dec 19, 2012 at 15:58
  • 1
    Latest version of chrome(59), (''+n)[1] seems to be faster... weird
    – JellyKid
    Jul 7, 2017 at 18:23
51

1st digit of number from right → number % 10 = Math.floor((number / 1) % 10)

1234 % 10; // 4
Math.floor((1234 / 1) % 10); // 4

2nd digit of number from right → Math.floor((number / 10) % 10)

Math.floor((1234 / 10) % 10); // 3

3rd digit of number from right → Math.floor((number / 100) % 10)

Math.floor((1234 / 100) % 10); // 2

nth digit of number from right → Math.floor((number / 10^n-1) % 10)

function getDigit(number, n) {
  return Math.floor((number / Math.pow(10, n - 1)) % 10);
}

number of digits in a number → Math.max(Math.floor(Math.log10(Math.abs(number))), 0) + 1 Credit to: https://stackoverflow.com/a/28203456/6917157

function getDigitCount(number) {
  return Math.max(Math.floor(Math.log10(Math.abs(number))), 0) + 1;
}

nth digit of number from left or right

function getDigit(number, n, fromLeft) {
  const location = fromLeft ? getDigitCount(number) + 1 - n : n;
  return Math.floor((number / Math.pow(10, location - 1)) % 10);
}
2
  • 1
    You answer is correct, but doesn't answer the question, because it asks about 2nd number from the left, not right :) Feb 1, 2017 at 4:34
  • Your answer works for me. I want to get total digits of a number and check each digit is greater than a constant. Mar 24, 2020 at 10:31
5

You know, I get that the question asks for how to do it without a number, but the title "JavaScript: Get the second digit from a number?" means a lot of people will find this answer when looking for a way to get a specific digit, period.

I'm not bashing the original question asker, I'm sure he/she had their reasons, but from a search practicality standpoint I think it's worth adding an answer here that does convert the number to a string and back because, if nothing else, it's a much more terse and easy to understand way of going about it.

let digit = Number((n).toString().split('').slice(1,1))

// e.g.
let digit = Number((1234).toString().split('').slice(1,1)) // outputs 2

Getting the digit without the string conversion is great, but when you're trying to write clear and concise code that other people and future you can look at really quick and fully understand, I think a quick string conversion one liner is a better way of doing it.

4

Get rid of the trailing digits by dividing the number with 10 till the number is less than 100, in a loop. Then perform a modulo with 10 to get the second digit.

if (x > 9) {
    while (x > 99) {
        x = (x / 10) | 0;  // Use bitwise '|' operator to force integer result.
    }
    secondDigit = x % 10;
}
else {
    // Handle the cases where x has only one digit.
}
4
  • 4
    you're going to write another if statement for every digit added? have fun with that.
    – jbabey
    Dec 19, 2012 at 15:38
  • 2
    @jbabey, sorry, I didn't understand what you meant by "if statement for every digit"?
    – Vikdor
    Dec 19, 2012 at 16:44
  • 2
    @jbabey, I still don't think your comment is relevant even to the first version of this response: stackoverflow.com/revisions/….
    – Vikdor
    Dec 20, 2012 at 1:25
  • 1
    There are still two (fixable) bugs in this solution : it doesn't work for negative numbers and it gives wrong digits for midly big numbers (try 9999999999|0 in the console to see why). May 27, 2014 at 8:00
4

A "number" is one thing.

The representation of that number (e.g. the base-10 string "1234") is another thing.

If you want a particular digit in a decimal string ... then your best bet is to get it from a string :)

Q: You're aware that there are pitfalls with integer arithmetic in Javascript, correct?

Q: Why is it so important to not use a string? Is this a homework assignment? An interview question?

3

function getNthDigit(val, n){
    //Remove all digits larger than nth
    var modVal = val % Math.pow(10,n);

    //Remove all digits less than nth
    return Math.floor(modVal / Math.pow(10,n-1));
}

// tests
[
  0, 
  1, 
  123, 
  123456789, 
  0.1, 
  0.001
].map(v => 
  console.log([
      getNthDigit(v, 1),
      getNthDigit(v, 2),
      getNthDigit(v, 3)
    ]
  ) 
);

2
  • 1
    Please edit with more information. Code-only and "try this" answers are discouraged, because they contain no searchable content, and don't explain why someone should "try this".
    – abarisone
    Sep 8, 2016 at 7:09
  • Maybe the answer's format ain't the best, but you do deserve credit for the test cases.
    – Artur
    Apr 21, 2020 at 22:40
3

This is how I would do with recursion

function getDigits(n, arr=[]) {
   arr.push(n % 10)

   if (n < 10) {
     return arr.reverse()
   }
   return getDigits(Math.floor(n/10),arr)
  }

const arr = getDigits(myVar)
console.log(arr[2])
1

Just a simple idea to get back any charter from a number as a string or int:

const myVar = 1234;
String(myVar).charAt(1)
//"2"
parseInt(String(myVar).charAt(1))
//2
0

I don’t know why you need this logic, but following logic will get you the second number

<script type="text/javascript">
    var myVal = 58445456;
    var var1 = new Number(myVal.toPrecision(1));
    var var2 = new Number(myVal.toPrecision(2));     
    var rem;
    rem = var1 - var2;
    var multi = 0.1;
    var oldvalue;
    while (rem > 10) {
        oldvalue = rem;
        rem = rem * multi;
        rem = rem.toFixed();           
    }
    alert(10-rem);       
</script>
0

function getDigit(number, indexFromRight) { 
            var maxNumber = 9
            for (var i = 0; i < indexFromRight - 2; i++) {
                maxNumber = maxNumber * 10 + 9
            }
            if (number > maxNumber) {
                number = number / Math.pow(10, indexFromRight - 1) | 0
                return number % 10
            } else
                return 0
        }

0

you can use this function index = 0 will give you the first digit from the right (the ones) index = 1 will give you the second digit from the right (the tens)

and so on

const getDigit = (num, index) => {
    

    if(index === 0) {
        return num % 10;
    }

    let result = undefined;

    for(let i = 1; i <= index; i++) {
        num -= num % 10;
        num /= 10;
        result = num % 10;
    }

    return result;

}

for Example:

getDigit(125, 0)   // returns 5
gitDigit(125, 1)   // returns 2
gitDigit(125, 2)   // returns 1
gitDigit(125, 3)   // returns 0
0
function left(num) {
    let newarr = [];
    let numstring = num.split('[a-z]').join();
    //return numstring;
    const regex = /[0-9]/g;
    const found = numstring.match(regex);
   // return found;
    for(i=0; i<found.length; i++){
        return found[i];
    }
    } 
//}
console.log(left("TrAdE2W1n95!"))
0
function getNthDigit(n, number){
    return ((number % Math.pow(10,n)) - (number % Math.pow(10,n-1))) / Math.pow(10,n-1);
}

Explanation (Number: 987654321, n: 5):
a = (number % Math.pow(10,n)) - Remove digits above => 54321
b = (number % Math.pow(10,n-1)) - Extract digits below => 4321
a - b => 50000
(a - b) / 10^(5-1) = (a - b) / 10000 => 5

-4
var newVar = myVar;
while (newVar > 100) {
    newVar /= 10;
}

if (newVar > 0 && newVar < 10) {
   newVar = newVar;
}

else if (newVar >= 10 && newVar < 20) {
   newVar -= 10;
}

else if (newVar >= 20 && newVar < 30) {
   newVar -= 20;
}

else if (newVar >= 30 && newVar < 40) {
   newVar -= 30;
}

else if (newVar >= 40 && newVar < 50) {
   newVar -= 40;
}

else if (newVar >= 50 && newVar < 60) {
   newVar -= 50;
}

else if (newVar >= 60 && newVar < 70) {
   newVar -= 60;
}

else if (newVar >= 70 && newVar < 80) {
   newVar -= 70;
}

else if (newVar >= 80 && newVar < 90) {
   newVar -= 80;
}

else if (newVar >= 90 && newVar < 100) {
   newVar -= 90;
}

else {
   newVar = 0;
}

var secondDigit = Math.floor(newVar);

That's how I'd do it :)

And here's a JSFiddle showing it works :) http://jsfiddle.net/Cuytd/

This is also assuming that your original number is always greater than 9... If it's not always greater than 9 then I guess you wouldn't be asking this question ;)

3
  • 1
    Why have I been down voted!? My answer is the only correct one so far :P Dec 19, 2012 at 16:01
  • and what if I want the third or fourth digit, depending on the state of a control bit? ;)
    – Lotus
    Oct 11, 2015 at 5:59
  • switch case is your friend! Jul 6, 2019 at 2:55

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