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I'm an admin used to the old-school way of defining servlets/mappings, i.e. in web.xml.

Servlet 3.0 is great, and the @WebServlet annotation sure is nifty, if you're a developer.

The problem is, as an admin, what if I'm managing a webapp that contains lots of different utility servlets (servlets.jar) defined by annotations, and not all of them are appropriate for each deployment? In other words, I want to either whitelist the URI mappings that are appropriate for a given deployment, or blacklist the ones that aren't.

Without reverting to an earlier servlet spec, and ideally (though this is not off the table) without asking my developers to change the way they're doing things.

Running JDK 1.7 Tomcat 7 if that matters.

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I want to either whitelist the URI mappings that are appropriate for a given deployment, or blacklist the ones that aren't.

You can use a <security-constraint> with an empty <auth-constraint> to block access to the given URL pattern(s).

<security-constraint>
    <display-name>Restrict direct access to some servlets.</display-name>
    <web-resource-collection>
        <web-resource-name>Restricted URLs</web-resource-name>
        <url-pattern>/servlet1/*</url-pattern>
        <url-pattern>/servlet2/*</url-pattern>
        <url-pattern>/servlet3/*</url-pattern>
        <!-- ... -->
    </web-resource-collection>
    <auth-constraint />
</security-constraint>
  • I have a similar problem. I don't want to block access, I just want to disable one that's annoyingly been included in a third party client drop-in. – ndtreviv Aug 8 '14 at 14:25
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You can disable the jar scanning adding the metadata-complete="true" to web-app tag in the web.xml. In this way you will need to all servlets, filters, etc. inside the web.xml as usual.

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