173

I have the following code:

info = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo("TheProgram.exe", String.Join(" ", args));
info.CreateNoWindow = true;
info.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
info.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
info.UseShellExecute = false;
System.Diagnostics.Process p = System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(info);
p.WaitForExit();
Console.WriteLine(p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd()); //need the StandardOutput contents

I know that the output from the process I am starting is around 7MB long. Running it in the Windows console works fine. Unfortunately programmatically this hangs indefinitely at WaitForExit. Note also this does code NOT hang for smaller outputs (like 3KB).

Is it possible that the internal StandardOutput in ProcessStartInfo can't buffer 7MB? If so, what should I do instead? If not, what am I doing wrong?

  • any final solution with full source code about it ? – Kiquenet Jul 31 '12 at 6:36
  • 1
    I run into same issue and this how I was able to solve it stackoverflow.com/questions/2285288/… – Bedasso Oct 11 '12 at 21:19
  • 3
    Yes, final solution: swap the last two lines. It's in the manual. – Amit Naidu Jun 4 '13 at 20:32
  • 1
    from msdn: The code example avoids a deadlock condition by calling p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd before p.WaitForExit. A deadlock condition can result if the parent process calls p.WaitForExit before p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd and the child process writes enough text to fill the redirected stream. The parent process would wait indefinitely for the child process to exit. The child process would wait indefinitely for the parent to read from the full StandardOutput stream. – Carlos Liu Sep 3 '18 at 7:54
  • it's a bit annoying how complex it is to do this properly. Was pleased to work around it with simpler command line redirects > outputfile :) – eglasius Jun 7 at 9:13

21 Answers 21

368

The problem is that if you redirect StandardOutput and/or StandardError the internal buffer can become full. Whatever order you use, there can be a problem:

  • If you wait for the process to exit before reading StandardOutput the process can block trying to write to it, so the process never ends.
  • If you read from StandardOutput using ReadToEnd then your process can block if the process never closes StandardOutput (for example if it never terminates, or if it is blocked writing to StandardError).

The solution is to use asynchronous reads to ensure that the buffer doesn't get full. To avoid any deadlocks and collect up all output from both StandardOutput and StandardError you can do this:

EDIT: See answers below for how avoid an ObjectDisposedException if the timeout occurs.

using (Process process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo.FileName = filename;
    process.StartInfo.Arguments = arguments;
    process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;

    StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder error = new StringBuilder();

    using (AutoResetEvent outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
    using (AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
    {
        process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) => {
            if (e.Data == null)
            {
                outputWaitHandle.Set();
            }
            else
            {
                output.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };
        process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.Data == null)
            {
                errorWaitHandle.Set();
            }
            else
            {
                error.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };

        process.Start();

        process.BeginOutputReadLine();
        process.BeginErrorReadLine();

        if (process.WaitForExit(timeout) &&
            outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout) &&
            errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
        {
            // Process completed. Check process.ExitCode here.
        }
        else
        {
            // Timed out.
        }
    }
}
  • 7
    Had no idea redirecting the output was causing the issue but sure enough it was. Spent 4 hours pounding my head on this and fixed it in 5 minutes after reading your post. Nice work! – Ben Gripka May 13 '13 at 16:37
  • 1
    @AlexPeck The issue was running this as a console app. Hans Passant identified the issue here: stackoverflow.com/a/16218470/279516 – Bob Horn Sep 12 '13 at 18:53
  • 4
    everytime the command prompt closes, this appears: An unhandled exception of type"System.ObjectDisposed" occurred in mscorlib.dll Additional info:Safe handle has been closed – user1663380 Sep 24 '14 at 5:42
  • 2
    We had a similar problem as described by @user1663380 above. Do you think it is possible that using statements for the event handlers need to be above the using statement for the process itself? – Dan Forbes Sep 8 '15 at 15:18
  • 2
    I don't think the wait handles are needed. As per msdn, just finish off with the non-timeout version of WaitForExit: When standard output has been redirected to asynchronous event handlers, it is possible that output processing will not have completed when this method returns. To ensure that asynchronous event handling has been completed, call the WaitForExit() overload that takes no parameter after receiving a true from this overload. – Patrick Feb 3 '16 at 1:05
92

The documentation for Process.StandardOutput says to read before you wait otherwise you can deadlock, snippet copied below:

 // Start the child process.
 Process p = new Process();
 // Redirect the output stream of the child process.
 p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
 p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
 p.StartInfo.FileName = "Write500Lines.exe";
 p.Start();
 // Do not wait for the child process to exit before
 // reading to the end of its redirected stream.
 // p.WaitForExit();
 // Read the output stream first and then wait.
 string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
 p.WaitForExit();
  • 14
    I'm not 100% certain if this is just a result of my environment, but I found if you have set RedirectStandardOutput = true; and don't use p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); you get a deadlock/hang. – Chris S Feb 3 '12 at 15:16
  • 3
    True. I was in a similar situation. I was redirecting StandardError for no reason when converting with ffmpeg in a process, it was writting enough in the StandardError stream to create a deadlock. – Léon Pelletier Oct 1 '12 at 7:29
  • This still hangs for me even with redirecting and reading standard output. – user3791372 Apr 14 '17 at 4:33
  • @user3791372 I guess this is only applicable if the buffer behind the StandardOutput is not fully filled. Here the MSDN does not do its justice. A great article that I would recommend you to read is at: dzone.com/articles/async-io-and-threadpool – Cary Aug 21 at 9:18
19

Mark Byers' answer is excellent, but I would just add the following: the OutputDataReceived and ErrorDataReceived delegates need to be removed before the outputWaitHandle and errorWaitHandle get disposed. If the process continues to output data after the timeout has been exceeded and then terminates, the outputWaitHandle and errorWaitHandle variables will be accessed after being disposed.

(FYI I had to add this caveat as an answer as I couldn't comment on his post.)

  • 2
    Perhaps it would be better to call CancelOutputRead? – Mark Byers Jun 16 '12 at 20:31
  • Adding Mark's edited code to this answer would be rather awesome! I am having the exact same issue at the minute. – ianbailey Jan 10 '13 at 11:32
  • 8
    @ianbailey Easiest way to solve this is to put the using(Process p ...) inside the using(AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle...) – Didier A. Apr 3 '13 at 16:19
17

The problem with unhandled ObjectDisposedException happens when the process is timed out. In such case the other parts of the condition:

if (process.WaitForExit(timeout) 
    && outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout) 
    && errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))

are not executed. I resolved this problem in a following way:

using (AutoResetEvent outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
using (AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
{
    using (Process process = new Process())
    {
        // preparing ProcessStartInfo

        try
        {
            process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    if (e.Data == null)
                    {
                        outputWaitHandle.Set();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        outputBuilder.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    }
                };
            process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    if (e.Data == null)
                    {
                        errorWaitHandle.Set();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        errorBuilder.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    }
                };

            process.Start();

            process.BeginOutputReadLine();
            process.BeginErrorReadLine();

            if (process.WaitForExit(timeout))
            {
                exitCode = process.ExitCode;
            }
            else
            {
                // timed out
            }

            output = outputBuilder.ToString();
        }
        finally
        {
            outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
            errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    for the sake of completeness, this is missing setting up the redirects to true – knocte Nov 27 '16 at 6:20
  • and I've removed the timeouts in my end since the process may ask for user input (e.g. type something) so I don't want to require the user to be fast – knocte Nov 27 '16 at 6:21
  • Why have you changed output and error to outputBuilder? Can someone please provide complete answer that works? – Marko Avlijaš Apr 4 '17 at 11:32
  • System.ObjectDisposedException: Safe handle has been closed occurs on this version for me as well – Matt Dec 27 '18 at 17:25
14

This is a more modern awaitable, Task Parallel Library (TPL) based solution for .NET 4.5 and above.

Usage Example

try
{
    var exitCode = await StartProcess(
        "dotnet", 
        "--version", 
        @"C:\",
        10000, 
        Console.Out, 
        Console.Out);
    Console.WriteLine($"Process Exited with Exit Code {exitCode}!");
}
catch (TaskCanceledException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Process Timed Out!");
}

Implementation

public static async Task<int> StartProcess(
    string filename,
    string arguments,
    string workingDirectory= null,
    int? timeout = null,
    TextWriter outputTextWriter = null,
    TextWriter errorTextWriter = null)
{
    using (var process = new Process()
    {
        StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo()
        {
            CreateNoWindow = true,
            Arguments = arguments,
            FileName = filename,
            RedirectStandardOutput = outputTextWriter != null,
            RedirectStandardError = errorTextWriter != null,
            UseShellExecute = false,
            WorkingDirectory = workingDirectory
        }
    })
    {
        process.Start();
        var cancellationTokenSource = timeout.HasValue ?
            new CancellationTokenSource(timeout.Value) :
            new CancellationTokenSource();

        var tasks = new List<Task>(3) { process.WaitForExitAsync(cancellationTokenSource.Token) };
        if (outputTextWriter != null)
        {
            tasks.Add(ReadAsync(
                x =>
                {
                    process.OutputDataReceived += x;
                    process.BeginOutputReadLine();
                },
                x => process.OutputDataReceived -= x,
                outputTextWriter,
                cancellationTokenSource.Token));
        }

        if (errorTextWriter != null)
        {
            tasks.Add(ReadAsync(
                x =>
                {
                    process.ErrorDataReceived += x;
                    process.BeginErrorReadLine();
                },
                x => process.ErrorDataReceived -= x,
                errorTextWriter,
                cancellationTokenSource.Token));
        }

        await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
        return process.ExitCode;
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Waits asynchronously for the process to exit.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="process">The process to wait for cancellation.</param>
/// <param name="cancellationToken">A cancellation token. If invoked, the task will return
/// immediately as cancelled.</param>
/// <returns>A Task representing waiting for the process to end.</returns>
public static Task WaitForExitAsync(
    this Process process,
    CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken))
{
    process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

    var taskCompletionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

    EventHandler handler = null;
    handler = (sender, args) =>
    {
        process.Exited -= handler;
        taskCompletionSource.TrySetResult(null);
    };
    process.Exited += handler;

    if (cancellationToken != default(CancellationToken))
    {
        cancellationToken.Register(
            () =>
            {
                process.Exited -= handler;
                taskCompletionSource.TrySetCanceled();
            });
    }

    return taskCompletionSource.Task;
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads the data from the specified data recieved event and writes it to the
/// <paramref name="textWriter"/>.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="addHandler">Adds the event handler.</param>
/// <param name="removeHandler">Removes the event handler.</param>
/// <param name="textWriter">The text writer.</param>
/// <param name="cancellationToken">The cancellation token.</param>
/// <returns>A task representing the asynchronous operation.</returns>
public static Task ReadAsync(
    this Action<DataReceivedEventHandler> addHandler,
    Action<DataReceivedEventHandler> removeHandler,
    TextWriter textWriter,
    CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken))
{
    var taskCompletionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

    DataReceivedEventHandler handler = null;
    handler = new DataReceivedEventHandler(
        (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.Data == null)
            {
                removeHandler(handler);
                taskCompletionSource.TrySetResult(null);
            }
            else
            {
                textWriter.WriteLine(e.Data);
            }
        });

    addHandler(handler);

    if (cancellationToken != default(CancellationToken))
    {
        cancellationToken.Register(
            () =>
            {
                removeHandler(handler);
                taskCompletionSource.TrySetCanceled();
            });
    }

    return taskCompletionSource.Task;
}
  • 2
    best and most complete answer to date – Infinum Sep 20 '17 at 15:09
  • 1
    For some reaon, this was the only solution that worked for me, the application stoped hangging. – Jack Dec 19 '18 at 20:38
7

We have this issue as well (or a variant).

Try the following:

1) Add a timeout to p.WaitForExit(nnnn); where nnnn is in milliseconds.

2) Put the ReadToEnd call before the WaitForExit call. This is what we've seen MS recommend.

7

Rob answered it and saved me few more hours of trials. Read the output/error buffer before waiting:

// Read the output stream first and then wait.
string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
p.WaitForExit();
  • 1
    but what if more data comes after you have called WaitForExit()? – knocte Nov 26 '16 at 11:04
  • @knocte based on my tests, ReadToEnd or similar methods (like StandardOutput.BaseStream.CopyTo) will return after ALL data is read. nothing will come after it – S.Serpooshan Dec 13 '17 at 11:44
  • you're saying that ReadToEnd() also waits for the exit? – knocte Dec 14 '17 at 5:41
  • 2
    @knocte you're trying to make sense of an API created by microsoft? – aaaaaa Feb 25 '18 at 0:23
  • The problem of the corresponding MSDN page is, it didn't explain that the buffer behind the StandardOutput can become full and in that situation the child must stop writing and wait until the buffer is drained (the parent read away the data in the buffer). ReadToEnd() can only synch-ly read until the buffer is closed or the buffer is full, or child exits with buffer not full. That is my understanding. – Cary Aug 21 at 9:40
4

Credit to EM0 for https://stackoverflow.com/a/17600012/4151626

The other solutions (including EM0's) still deadlocked for my application, due to internal timeouts and the use of both StandardOutput and StandardError by the spawned application. Here is what worked for me:

Process p = new Process()
{
  StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo()
  {
    FileName = exe,
    Arguments = args,
    UseShellExecute = false,
    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
    RedirectStandardError = true
  }
};
p.Start();

string cv_error = null;
Thread et = new Thread(() => { cv_error = p.StandardError.ReadToEnd(); });
et.Start();

string cv_out = null;
Thread ot = new Thread(() => { cv_out = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); });
ot.Start();

p.WaitForExit();
ot.Join();
et.Join();

Edit: added initialization of StartInfo to code sample

3

I solved it this way:

            Process proc = new Process();
            proc.StartInfo.FileName = batchFile;
            proc.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            proc.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            proc.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
            proc.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
            proc.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            proc.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;      
            proc.Start();
            StreamWriter streamWriter = proc.StandardInput;
            StreamReader outputReader = proc.StandardOutput;
            StreamReader errorReader = proc.StandardError;
            while (!outputReader.EndOfStream)
            {
                string text = outputReader.ReadLine();                    
                streamWriter.WriteLine(text);
            }

            while (!errorReader.EndOfStream)
            {                   
                string text = errorReader.ReadLine();
                streamWriter.WriteLine(text);
            }

            streamWriter.Close();
            proc.WaitForExit();

I redirected both input, output and error and handled reading from output and error streams. This solution works for SDK 7- 8.1, both for Windows 7 and Windows 8

  • 2
    Elina: thanks for your answer. There are some notes at the bottom of this MSDN doc (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) that warn about potential deadlocks if you read to the end of both redirected stdout and stderr streams synchronously. It's hard to tell if your solution is susceptible to this issue. Also, it appears that you are sending the process' stdout/stderr output right back in as input. Why? :) – Matthew Piatt Sep 26 '16 at 4:42
3

I tried to make a class that would solve your problem using asynchronous stream read, by taking in account Mark Byers, Rob, stevejay answers. Doing so I realised that there is a bug related to asynchronous process output stream read.

I reported that bug at Microsoft: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/3119134

Summary:

You can't do that:

process.BeginOutputReadLine(); process.Start();

You will receive System.InvalidOperationException : StandardOut has not been redirected or the process hasn't started yet.

============================================================================================================================

Then you have to start asynchronous output read after the process is started:

process.Start(); process.BeginOutputReadLine();

Doing so, make a race condition because the output stream can receive data before you set it to asynchronous:

process.Start(); 
// Here the operating system could give the cpu to another thread.  
// For example, the newly created thread (Process) and it could start writing to the output
// immediately before next line would execute. 
// That create a race condition.
process.BeginOutputReadLine();

============================================================================================================================

Then some people could say that you just have to read the stream before you set it to asynchronous. But the same problem occurs. There will be a race condition between the synchronous read and set the stream into asynchronous mode.

============================================================================================================================

There is no way to acheive safe asynchronous read of an output stream of a process in the actual way "Process" and "ProcessStartInfo" has been designed.

You are probably better using asynchronous read like suggested by other users for your case. But you should be aware that you could miss some information due to race condition.

1

None of the answers above is doing the job.

Rob solution hangs and 'Mark Byers' solution get the disposed exception.(I tried the "solutions" of the other answers).

So I decided to suggest another solution:

public void GetProcessOutputWithTimeout(Process process, int timeoutSec, CancellationToken token, out string output, out int exitCode)
{
    string outputLocal = "";  int localExitCode = -1;
    var task = System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        outputLocal = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
        process.WaitForExit();
        localExitCode = process.ExitCode;
    }, token);

    if (task.Wait(timeoutSec, token))
    {
        output = outputLocal;
        exitCode = localExitCode;
    }
    else
    {
        exitCode = -1;
        output = "";
    }
}

using (var process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo = ...;
    process.Start();
    string outputUnicode; int exitCode;
    GetProcessOutputWithTimeout(process, PROCESS_TIMEOUT, out outputUnicode, out exitCode);
}

This code debugged and works perfectly.

  • 1
    Good! just note that the token parameter is not provided when calling GetProcessOutputWithTimeout method. – S.Serpooshan Dec 13 '17 at 12:23
1

Introduction

Currently accepted answer doesn't work (throws exception) and there are too many workarounds but no complete code. This is obviously wasting lots of people's time because this is a popular question.

Combining Mark Byers' answer and Karol Tyl's answer I wrote full code based on how I want to use the Process.Start method.

Usage

I have used it to create progress dialog around git commands. This is how I've used it:

    private bool Run(string fullCommand)
    {
        Error = "";
        int timeout = 5000;

        var result = ProcessNoBS.Start(
            filename: @"C:\Program Files\Git\cmd\git.exe",
            arguments: fullCommand,
            timeoutInMs: timeout,
            workingDir: @"C:\test");

        if (result.hasTimedOut)
        {
            Error = String.Format("Timeout ({0} sec)", timeout/1000);
            return false;
        }

        if (result.ExitCode != 0)
        {
            Error = (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(result.stderr)) 
                ? result.stdout : result.stderr;
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

In theory you can also combine stdout and stderr, but I haven't tested that.

Code

public struct ProcessResult
{
    public string stdout;
    public string stderr;
    public bool hasTimedOut;
    private int? exitCode;

    public ProcessResult(bool hasTimedOut = true)
    {
        this.hasTimedOut = hasTimedOut;
        stdout = null;
        stderr = null;
        exitCode = null;
    }

    public int ExitCode
    {
        get 
        {
            if (hasTimedOut)
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    "There was no exit code - process has timed out.");

            return (int)exitCode;
        }
        set
        {
            exitCode = value;
        }
    }
}

public class ProcessNoBS
{
    public static ProcessResult Start(string filename, string arguments,
        string workingDir = null, int timeoutInMs = 5000,
        bool combineStdoutAndStderr = false)
    {
        using (AutoResetEvent outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
        using (AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
        {
            using (var process = new Process())
            {
                var info = new ProcessStartInfo();

                info.CreateNoWindow = true;
                info.FileName = filename;
                info.Arguments = arguments;
                info.UseShellExecute = false;
                info.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
                info.RedirectStandardError = true;

                if (workingDir != null)
                    info.WorkingDirectory = workingDir;

                process.StartInfo = info;

                StringBuilder stdout = new StringBuilder();
                StringBuilder stderr = combineStdoutAndStderr
                    ? stdout : new StringBuilder();

                var result = new ProcessResult();

                try
                {
                    process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                    {
                        if (e.Data == null)
                            outputWaitHandle.Set();
                        else
                            stdout.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    };
                    process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                    {
                        if (e.Data == null)
                            errorWaitHandle.Set();
                        else
                            stderr.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    };

                    process.Start();

                    process.BeginOutputReadLine();
                    process.BeginErrorReadLine();

                    if (process.WaitForExit(timeoutInMs))
                        result.ExitCode = process.ExitCode;
                    // else process has timed out 
                    // but that's already default ProcessResult

                    result.stdout = stdout.ToString();
                    if (combineStdoutAndStderr)
                        result.stderr = null;
                    else
                        result.stderr = stderr.ToString();

                    return result;
                }
                finally
                {
                    outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeoutInMs);
                    errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeoutInMs);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  • Still get System.ObjectDisposedException: Safe handle has been closed on this version too. – Matt Dec 27 '18 at 17:25
1

I know that this is supper old but, after reading this whole page none of the solutions was working for me, although I didn't try Muhammad Rehan as the code was a little hard to follow, although I guess he was on the right track. When I say it didn't work that's not entirely true, sometimes it would work fine, I guess it is something to do with the length of the output before an EOF mark.

Anyway, the solution that worked for me was to use different threads to read the StandardOutput and StandardError and write the messages.

        StreamWriter sw = null;
        var queue = new ConcurrentQueue<string>();

        var flushTask = new System.Timers.Timer(50);
        flushTask.Elapsed += (s, e) =>
        {
            while (!queue.IsEmpty)
            {
                string line = null;
                if (queue.TryDequeue(out line))
                    sw.WriteLine(line);
            }
            sw.FlushAsync();
        };
        flushTask.Start();

        using (var process = new Process())
        {
            try
            {
                process.StartInfo.FileName = @"...";
                process.StartInfo.Arguments = $"...";
                process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
                process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
                process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;

                process.Start();

                var outputRead = Task.Run(() =>
                {
                    while (!process.StandardOutput.EndOfStream)
                    {
                        queue.Enqueue(process.StandardOutput.ReadLine());
                    }
                });

                var errorRead = Task.Run(() =>
                {
                    while (!process.StandardError.EndOfStream)
                    {
                        queue.Enqueue(process.StandardError.ReadLine());
                    }
                });

                var timeout = new TimeSpan(hours: 0, minutes: 10, seconds: 0);

                if (Task.WaitAll(new[] { outputRead, errorRead }, timeout) &&
                    process.WaitForExit((int)timeout.TotalMilliseconds))
                {
                    if (process.ExitCode != 0)
                    {
                        throw new Exception($"Failed run... blah blah");
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new Exception($"process timed out after waiting {timeout}");
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                throw new Exception($"Failed to succesfully run the process.....", e);
            }
        }
    }

Hope this helps someone, who thought this could be so hard!

  • Exception: sw.FlushAsync(): Object is not set to an instance of an object. sw is null. How/where should sw be defined? – wallyk May 3 '18 at 17:17
1

After reading all the posts here, i settled on the consolidated solution of Marko Avlijaš. However, it did not solve all of my issues.

In our environment we have a Windows Service which is scheduled to run hundreds of different .bat .cmd .exe,... etc. files which have accumulated over the years and were written by many different people and in different styles. We have no control over the writing of the programs & scripts, we are just responsible for scheduling, running, and reporting on success/failure.

So i tried pretty much all of the suggestions here with different levels of success. Marko's answer was almost perfect, but when run as a service, it didnt always capture stdout. I never got to the bottom of why not.

The only solution we found that works in ALL our cases is this : http://csharptest.net/319/using-the-processrunner-class/index.html

  • I am going to try this library. I have scoped the code, and it looks to be using delegates sensibly. It is nicely packaged in Nuget. It basically stinks of professionalism, something that I could never be accused of. If it bites, will tell. – Steve Hibbert Aug 7 '18 at 12:59
  • The link to the source code is dead. Please next time copy the code to the answer. – Vitaly Zdanevich May 3 at 14:29
1

Workaround I ended up using to avoid all the complexity:

var outputFile = Path.GetTempFileName();
info = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo("TheProgram.exe", String.Join(" ", args) + " > " + outputFile + " 2>&1");
info.CreateNoWindow = true;
info.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
info.UseShellExecute = false;
System.Diagnostics.Process p = System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(info);
p.WaitForExit();
Console.WriteLine(File.ReadAllText(outputFile)); //need the StandardOutput contents

So I create a temp file, redirect both the output and error to it by using > outputfile > 2>&1 and then just read the file after the process has finished.

The other solutions are fine for scenarios where you want to do other stuff with the output, but for simple stuff this avoids a lot of complexity.

0

This post maybe outdated but i found out the main cause why it usually hang is due to stack overflow for the redirectStandardoutput or if you have redirectStandarderror.

As the output data or the error data is large, it will cause a hang time as it is still processing for indefinite duration.

so to resolve this issue:

p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardoutput = False
p.StartInfo.RedirectStandarderror = False
  • 11
    The problem is that people explicitly set those to true because they want to be able to access those streams! Else indeed we can just leave them to false. – user276648 Mar 7 '13 at 9:58
0

I thing that this is simple and better approach (we don't need AutoResetEvent):

public static string GGSCIShell(string Path, string Command)
{
    using (Process process = new Process())
    {
        process.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = Path;
        process.StartInfo.FileName = Path + @"\ggsci.exe";
        process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;

        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
        process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.Data != null)
            {
                output.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };

        process.Start();
        process.StandardInput.WriteLine(Command);
        process.BeginOutputReadLine();


        int timeoutParts = 10;
        int timeoutPart = (int)TIMEOUT / timeoutParts;
        do
        {
            Thread.Sleep(500);//sometimes halv scond is enough to empty output buff (therefore "exit" will be accepted without "timeoutPart" waiting)
            process.StandardInput.WriteLine("exit");
            timeoutParts--;
        }
        while (!process.WaitForExit(timeoutPart) && timeoutParts > 0);

        if (timeoutParts <= 0)
        {
            output.AppendLine("------ GGSCIShell TIMEOUT: " + TIMEOUT + "ms ------");
        }

        string result = output.ToString();
        return result;
    }
}
  • True, but shouldn't you be doing .FileName = Path + @"\ggsci.exe" + @" < obeycommand.txt" to simplify your code too? Or maybe something equivalent to "echo command | " + Path + @"\ggsci.exe" if you really don't want to use a separate obeycommand.txt file. – Amit Naidu Jun 4 '13 at 22:03
  • 3
    Your solution does not need AutoResetEvent but you poll. When you do poll instead of using event (when they are available) then you are using CPU for no reason and that indicate that you are a bad programmer. Your solution is really bad when compared with the other using AutoResetEvent. (But I did not give you -1 because you tried to help!). – Eric Ouellet Nov 7 '14 at 18:38
0

I think with async, it is possible to have a more elegant solution and not having deadlocks even when using both standardOutput and standardError:

using (Process process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo.FileName = filename;
    process.StartInfo.Arguments = arguments;
    process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;

    process.Start();

    var tStandardOutput = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEndAsync();
    var tStandardError = process.StandardError.ReadToEndAsync();

    if (process.WaitForExit(timeout))
    {
        string output = await tStandardOutput;
        string errors = await tStandardError;

        // Process completed. Check process.ExitCode here.
    }
    else
    {
        // Timed out.
    }
}

It is base on Mark Byers answer. If you are not in an async method, you can use string output = tStandardOutput.result; instead of await

0

I've read many of the answers and made my own. Not sure this one will fix in any case, but it fixes in my environment. I'm just not using WaitForExit and use WaitHandle.WaitAll on both output & error end signals. I will be glad, if someone will see possible problems with that. Or if it will help someone. For me it's better because not uses timeouts.

private static int DoProcess(string workingDir, string fileName, string arguments)
{
    int exitCode;
    using (var process = new Process
    {
        StartInfo =
        {
            WorkingDirectory = workingDir,
            WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden,
            CreateNoWindow = true,
            UseShellExecute = false,
            FileName = fileName,
            Arguments = arguments,
            RedirectStandardError = true,
            RedirectStandardOutput = true
        },
        EnableRaisingEvents = true
    })
    {
        using (var outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
        using (var errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
        {
            process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, args) =>
            {
                // ReSharper disable once AccessToDisposedClosure
                if (args.Data != null) Debug.Log(args.Data);
                else outputWaitHandle.Set();
            };
            process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, args) =>
            {
                // ReSharper disable once AccessToDisposedClosure
                if (args.Data != null) Debug.LogError(args.Data);
                else errorWaitHandle.Set();
            };

            process.Start();
            process.BeginOutputReadLine();
            process.BeginErrorReadLine();

            WaitHandle.WaitAll(new WaitHandle[] { outputWaitHandle, errorWaitHandle });

            exitCode = process.ExitCode;
        }
    }
    return exitCode;
}
-1

Let us call the sample code posted here the redirector and the other program the redirected. If it were me then I would probably write a test redirected program that can be used to duplicate the problem.

So I did. For test data I used the ECMA-334 C# Language Specificationv PDF; it is about 5MB. The following is the important part of that.

StreamReader stream = null;
try { stream = new StreamReader(Path); }
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.Error.WriteLine("Input open error: " + ex.Message);
    return;
}
Console.SetIn(stream);
int datasize = 0;
try
{
    string record = Console.ReadLine();
    while (record != null)
    {
        datasize += record.Length + 2;
        record = Console.ReadLine();
        Console.WriteLine(record);
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.Error.WriteLine($"Error: {ex.Message}");
    return;
}

The datasize value does not match the actual file size but that does not matter. It is not clear if a PDF file always uses both CR and LF at the end of lines but that does not matter for this. You can use any other large text file to test with.

Using that the sample redirector code hangs when I write the large amount of data but not when I write a small amount.

I tried very much to somehow trace the execution of that code and I could not. I commented out the lines of the redirected program that disabled creation of a console for the redirected program to try to get a separate console window but I could not.

Then I found How to start a console app in a new window, the parent’s window, or no window. So apparently we cannot (easily) have a separate console when one console program starts another console program without ShellExecute and since ShellExecute does not support redirection we must share a console, even if we specify no window for the other process.

I assume that if the redirected program fills up a buffer somewhere then it must wait for the data to be read and if at that point no data is read by the redirector then it is a deadlock.

The solution is to not use ReadToEnd and to read the data while the data is being written but it is not necessary to use asynchronous reads. The solution can be quite simple. The following works for me with the 5 MB PDF.

ProcessStartInfo info = new ProcessStartInfo(TheProgram);
info.CreateNoWindow = true;
info.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
info.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
info.UseShellExecute = false;
Process p = Process.Start(info);
string record = p.StandardOutput.ReadLine();
while (record != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(record);
    record = p.StandardOutput.ReadLine();
}
p.WaitForExit();

Another possibility is to use a GUI program to do the redirection. The preceding code works in a WPF application except with obvious modifications.

-3

I was having the same issue, but the reason was different. It would however happen under Windows 8, but not under Windows 7. The following line seems to have caused the problem.

pProcess.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = False

The solution was to NOT disable UseShellExecute. I now received a Shell popup window, which is unwanted, but much better than the program waiting for nothing particular to happen. So I added the following work-around for that:

pProcess.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden

Now the only thing bothering me is to why this is happening under Windows 8 in the first place.

  • 1
    You need UseShellExecute to be set to false if you want to redirect the output. – Brad Moore Oct 7 '15 at 4:52

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