1164

Let's say I have an array of four objects:

var jsObjects = [
   {a: 1, b: 2}, 
   {a: 3, b: 4}, 
   {a: 5, b: 6}, 
   {a: 7, b: 8}
];

Is there a way that I can get the third object ({a: 5, b: 6}) by the value of the property b for example without a for...in loop?

4
  • 1
    Yes, it is possible, as long as the value of b is unique among all of the objects in your array (which it is in this example)
    – Will C.
    Dec 20, 2012 at 1:58
  • @undefined Pretty sure op wants to search the array for at the object having b = 6
    – Madbreaks
    Dec 20, 2012 at 1:59
  • 1
    I like short & sweet and compatible with pre-ES6 browsers... jsObjects.find(function(x) {if(x.b == 6) return x}) You can use it to grab the property a at the same time... jsObjects.find(function(x) {if(x.b == 6) return x}).a May 12, 2019 at 5:07

17 Answers 17

1652

Filter array of objects, which property matches value, returns array:

var result = jsObjects.filter(obj => {
  return obj.b === 6
})

See the MDN Docs on Array.prototype.filter()

const jsObjects = [
  {a: 1, b: 2}, 
  {a: 3, b: 4}, 
  {a: 5, b: 6}, 
  {a: 7, b: 8}
]

let result = jsObjects.filter(obj => {
  return obj.b === 6
})

console.log(result)

Find the value of the first element/object in the array, otherwise undefined is returned.

var result = jsObjects.find(obj => {
  return obj.b === 6
})

See the MDN Docs on Array.prototype.find()

const jsObjects = [
  {a: 1, b: 2}, 
  {a: 3, b: 4}, 
  {a: 5, b: 6}, 
  {a: 7, b: 8}
]

let result = jsObjects.find(obj => {
  return obj.b === 6
})

console.log(result)

20
  • 161
    This will return an array
    – nickf
    Dec 20, 2012 at 2:03
  • 43
    @nickf. I think it should, what if there are more objects with same properties? Otherwise: result[0] will be the first (unique) object in this case.
    – elclanrs
    Dec 20, 2012 at 2:05
  • 32
    To have it return just the first is easy. Add "[0]" to the end. #javaScriptIsAwesome! var result = jsObjects.filter(function( obj ) { return obj.b == 6; })[0];
    – Rap
    Oct 27, 2015 at 14:18
  • 36
    The question is "get JavaScript object", not "array of objects". Feb 14, 2016 at 21:02
  • 28
    @Gothdo is right. To get object we can use Array.find: var result = jsObjects.find(function( obj ) { return obj.b === 6; });
    – kolodi
    Apr 27, 2016 at 9:49
431
jsObjects.find(x => x.b === 6)

From MDN:

The find() method returns a value in the array, if an element in the array satisfies the provided testing function. Otherwise undefined is returned.


Side note: methods like find() and arrow functions are not supported by older browsers (like IE), so if you want to support these browsers, you should transpile your code using Babel.

7
  • 7
    Note that this is not supported in IE
    – 29er
    Sep 21, 2016 at 23:03
  • 54
    @29er Yes, I wrote that "methods like find() and arrow functions are not supported by all browsers". Sep 22, 2016 at 13:43
  • 4
    This is the best option if you want to modify the object in the original array. filter() returns a copy of the object, not the original object, so changes will not be reflected in the original array
    – ahaurat
    Jul 3, 2017 at 19:04
  • This is not exactly equivalent to @elclanrs's answer using filter(): it returns only the first match.
    – thdoan
    Apr 22, 2018 at 20:34
  • 5
    @thdoan The OP asked for "the object", not "an array of matching objects". elclanrs's answer is wrong. Apr 22, 2018 at 21:29
192

I don't know why you are against a for loop (presumably you meant a for loop, not specifically for..in), they are fast and easy to read. Anyhow, here's some options.

For loop:

function getByValue(arr, value) {

  for (var i=0, iLen=arr.length; i<iLen; i++) {

    if (arr[i].b == value) return arr[i];
  }
}

.filter

function getByValue2(arr, value) {

  var result  = arr.filter(function(o){return o.b == value;} );

  return result? result[0] : null; // or undefined

}

.forEach

function getByValue3(arr, value) {

  var result = [];

  arr.forEach(function(o){if (o.b == value) result.push(o);} );

  return result? result[0] : null; // or undefined

}

If, on the other hand you really did mean for..in and want to find an object with any property with a value of 6, then you must use for..in unless you pass the names to check.

Example

function getByValue4(arr, value) {
  var o;

  for (var i=0, iLen=arr.length; i<iLen; i++) {
    o = arr[i];

    for (var p in o) {
      if (o.hasOwnProperty(p) && o[p] == value) {
        return o;
      }
    }
  }
}
6
  • 19
    which one is the fastest one? Jul 9, 2015 at 14:20
  • 6
    Foor loop by far the fastest method (jsperf.com/extract-props/1).
    – Adriano P
    Mar 10, 2017 at 16:55
  • 3
    with es6 and later use: for(let value of arr)
    – pungggi
    Jun 15, 2017 at 13:03
  • 2
    @RobG any specific reason to store arr.length in iLen instead of directly using arr.length in the for condition as i<arr.length? Jan 24, 2018 at 15:04
  • 1
    @VikasPrasad—just a minor performance enhancement, probably doesn't help now but in the early days it did.
    – RobG
    Jan 24, 2018 at 23:58
57

Ways to achieve the requirement :

  1. Using Array.find() method :

const jsObject = [
   {a: 1, b: 2}, 
   {a: 3, b: 4}, 
   {a: 5, b: 6}, 
   {a: 7, b: 8}
];

const filteredResult = jsObject.find((e) => e.b == 6);

console.log(filteredResult);

  1. Using Array.filter() method :

const jsObjects = [
   {a: 1, b: 2}, 
   {a: 3, b: 4}, 
   {a: 5, b: 6}, 
   {a: 7, b: 8}
];

const filterObj = jsObjects.filter((e) => e.b == 6);

console.log(filterObj[0]);

  1. Using for...in loop :

const jsObjects = [
   {a: 1, b: 2}, 
   {a: 3, b: 4}, 
   {a: 5, b: 6}, 
   {a: 7, b: 8}
];

for (const i in jsObjects) {
  if (jsObjects[i].b == 6) {
    console.log(jsObjects[i]);
  }
}

0
32

OK, there are few ways to do that, but let's start with the simplest one and latest approach to do this, this function is called find().

Just be careful when you using find to as even IE11 dosn't support it, so it needs to be transpiled...

so you have this object as you said:

var jsObjects = [
   {a: 1, b: 2}, 
   {a: 3, b: 4}, 
   {a: 5, b: 6}, 
   {a: 7, b: 8}
];

and you can write a function and get it like this:

function filterValue(obj, key, value) {
  return obj.find(function(v){ return v[key] === value});
}

and use the function like this:

filterValue(jsObjects, "b", 6); //{a: 5, b: 6}

Also in ES6 for even shortened version:

const filterValue = (obj, key, value)=> obj.find(v => v[key] === value);

This method only return the first value which match..., for better result and browser support, you can use filter:

const filterValue = (obj, key, value)=> obj.filter(v => v[key] === value);

and we will return [{a: 5, b: 6}]...

This method will return an array instead...

You simpley use for loop as well, create a function like this:

function filteredArray(arr, key, value) {
  const newArray = [];
  for(i=0, l=arr.length; i<l; i++) {
    if(arr[i][key] === value) {
      newArray.push(arr[i]);
    }
  }
 return newArray;
}

and call it like this:

filteredArray(jsObjects, "b", 6); //[{a: 5, b: 6}]
1
  • 2
    Thanks @Alireza. Very complete answer. As for the .filter part: < This method will return an array instead... Not the most elegant solution, but consider adding [0] at the end, for a quick fix. const filterValue = (obj, key, value)=> obj.filter(v => v[key] === value)[0]; Apr 24, 2018 at 20:57
28

See this documentation Array.prototype.find()

Example:

var inventory = [
    {name: 'apples', quantity: 2},
    {name: 'bananas', quantity: 0},
    {name: 'cherries', quantity: 5}
];

function findCherries(fruit) { 
    return fruit.name === 'cherries';
}

console.log(inventory.find(findCherries)); 
// { name: 'cherries', quantity: 5 }
4
  • 3
    Not clear how this works with the 'find()' method you're calling. Additionally Object.values() is not supported in Internet Explorer. Dec 27, 2017 at 20:21
  • 1
    It seems that the link is mistaken. The author probably intended this one: Array.prototype.find() Apr 24, 2018 at 20:38
  • 1
    What does this return if it doesn't find anything? undefined? Mar 28, 2021 at 11:48
  • 1
    @OliverDixon yes. Mar 29, 2021 at 7:17
23

Using underscore.js:

var foundObject = _.findWhere(jsObjects, {b: 6});
1
21

It looks like in the ECMAScript 6 proposal there are the Array methods find() and findIndex(). MDN also offers polyfills which you can include to get the functionality of these across all browsers.

find():

function isPrime(element, index, array) {
    var start = 2;
    while (start <= Math.sqrt(element)) {
        if (element % start++ < 1) return false;
    }
    return (element > 1);
}

console.log( [4, 6, 8, 12].find(isPrime) ); // undefined, not found
console.log( [4, 5, 8, 12].find(isPrime) ); // 5

findIndex():

function isPrime(element, index, array) {
    var start = 2;
    while (start <= Math.sqrt(element)) {
        if (element % start++ < 1) return false;
    }
    return (element > 1);
}

console.log( [4, 6, 8, 12].findIndex(isPrime) ); // -1, not found
console.log( [4, 6, 7, 12].findIndex(isPrime) ); // 2
0
19

If I understand correctly, you want to find the object in the array whose b property is 6?

var found;
jsObjects.some(function (obj) {
  if (obj.b === 6) {
    found = obj;
    return true;
  }
});

Or if you were using underscore:

var found = _.select(jsObjects, function (obj) {
  return obj.b === 6;
});
4
  • 3
    some just returns true or false, it doesn't return the matching object.
    – RobG
    Dec 20, 2012 at 2:38
  • 6
    @RobG yep, well aware. Note how I'm not assigning the value from it? :) It's just being used here as a way to short-circuit the loop.
    – nickf
    Dec 20, 2012 at 7:30
  • Overcomplicated. .some() is meant to determine whether some element in the array passes the test. In this case it would be better to use .forEach(), since you already decided to assign the result to a variable. Feb 14, 2016 at 20:59
  • @Gothdo why would you continue looping through the array when you already have the result? The return true in a .some is essentially like a break in a for loop.
    – nickf
    Feb 16, 2016 at 9:58
18

If you are looking for a single result, rather than an array, may I suggest reduce?

Here is a solution in plain 'ole javascript that returns a matching object if one exists, or null if not.

var result = arr.reduce(function(prev, curr) { return (curr.b === 6) ? curr : prev; }, null);
14

You can use it with the arrow function as well like as below :

var demoArray = [
   {name: 'apples', quantity: 2},
   {name: 'bananas', quantity: 0},
   {name: 'cherries', quantity: 5}
];

var result = demoArray.filter( obj => obj.name === 'apples')[0];
console.log(result);
// {name: 'apples', quantity: 2}
11

How about using _.find(collection, [predicate=_.identity], [fromIndex=0]) of lo-dash to get object from array of objects by object property value. You could do something like this:

var o = _.find(jsObjects, {'b': 6});

Arguments:

collection (Array|Object): The collection to inspect.
[predicate=_.identity] (Function): The function invoked per iteration.
[fromIndex=0] (number): The index to search from.

Returns

(*): Returns the matched element (in your case, {a: 5, b: 6}), else undefined.

In terms of performance, _.find() is faster as it only pulls the first object with property {'b': 6}, on the other hand, if suppose your array contains multiple objects with matching set of properties (key:value), then you should consider using _.filter() method. So in your case, as your array has a single object with this property, I would use _.find().

8

Made the best/fastest part of this answer more re-usable & clear:

function getElByPropVal(myArray, prop, val){
    for (var i = 0, length = myArray.length; i < length; i++) {
        if (myArray[i][prop] == val){
            return myArray[i];
        }
    }
}
6
var result = jsObjects.filter(x=> x.b === 6);

will be better, using return in filter sometimes you can't get result (I dunno why)

3

To get first object from array of objects by a specific property value:

function getObjectFromObjectsArrayByPropertyValue(objectsArray, propertyName, propertyValue) {
  return objectsArray.find(function (objectsArrayElement) {
    return objectsArrayElement[propertyName] == propertyValue;
  });
}

function findObject () {
  var arrayOfObjectsString = document.getElementById("arrayOfObjects").value,
      arrayOfObjects,
      propertyName = document.getElementById("propertyName").value,
      propertyValue = document.getElementById("propertyValue").value,
      preview = document.getElementById("preview"),
      searchingObject;
  
  arrayOfObjects = JSON.parse(arrayOfObjectsString);
  
  console.debug(arrayOfObjects);
  
  if(arrayOfObjects && propertyName && propertyValue) {
    searchingObject = getObjectFromObjectsArrayByPropertyValue(arrayOfObjects, propertyName, propertyValue);
    if(searchingObject) {
      preview.innerHTML = JSON.stringify(searchingObject, false, 2);
    } else {
      preview.innerHTML = "there is no object with property " + propertyName + " = " + propertyValue + " in your array of objects";
    }
  }
}
pre {
  padding: 5px;
  border-radius: 4px;
  background: #f3f2f2;
}

textarea, button {
  width: 100%
}
<fieldset>
  <legend>Input Data:</legend>
  <label>Put here your array of objects</label>
  <textarea rows="7" id="arrayOfObjects">
  [
    {"a": 1, "b": 2},
    {"a": 3, "b": 4},
    {"a": 5, "b": 6},
    {"a": 7, "b": 8, "c": 157}
  ]
  </textarea>

  <hr>

  <label>property name: </label> <input type="text" id="propertyName"  value="b"/>
  <label>property value: </label> <input type="text" id="propertyValue" value=6 />
     
</fieldset>
<hr>
<button onclick="findObject()">find object in array!</button>
<hr>
<fieldset>
  <legend>Searching Result:</legend>
  <pre id="preview">click find</pre>
</fieldset>

2

Using find with bind to pass specific key values to a callback function.

   function byValue(o) { 
       return o.a === this.a && o.b === this.b; 
   };   

   var result = jsObjects.find(byValue.bind({ a: 5, b: 6 }));
-31
var jsObjects = [{a: 1, b: 2}, {a: 3, b: 4}, {a: 5, b: 6}, {a: 7, b: 8}];

to access the third object, use: jsObjects[2];
to access the third object b value, use: jsObjects[2].b;

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