11

Is there a function in R that efficiently checks if a value is larger than one and smaller than another number? It should work with vectors, too.

Essentially, I'm looking for a faster version of the following function:

> in.interval <- function(x, lo, hi) (x > lo & x < hi)
> in.interval(c(2,4,6), 3, 5)
[1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE

The problem here is that x has to be touched twice, and the computation consumes twice the memory compared to a more efficient approach. Internally, I would assume it to work like this:

  1. Compute tmp1 <- (x > lo)
  2. Compute tmp2 <- (x < hi)
  3. Compute retval <- tmp1 & tmp2

Now, after step 2, two Boolean vectors are in memory, and the x had to be looked at twice. My question is: Is there a (built-in?) function that does all of this in one step, without allocating the extra memory?

Following up this question: R: Select values from data table in range

EDIT: I have set up a Gist based on CauchyDistributedRV's answer at https://gist.github.com/4344844

7
  • For 1e8 values, the function needs about 12 seconds on my computer. How much faster do you want it to go? And how exactly are you going to check 2 conditions by accessing x only once? Can you point us towards the 'more efficient approach' you had in mind?
    – Joris Meys
    Dec 20, 2012 at 10:57
  • @JorisMeys: About 6 seconds would be good :-) Will edit the question later.
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 10:59
  • Maybe findInterval for a vectorized version of your question? Dec 20, 2012 at 12:12
  • @JorisMeys abs(x-(hi+lo)/2)-(hi-lo)/2 < 0
    – James
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:19
  • @James Thx. I figured it out already, but was hoping OP would do an effort using the grey matter that fills his/her head :). As you put it in a comment, you can give the answer too if you want.
    – Joris Meys
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:23

4 Answers 4

6

As @James said in the comments, the trick is to substract the middle between low and high from x, and then check whether that difference is less than half of the distance between low and high. Or, in code :

in.interval2 <- function(x, lo, hi) {
    abs(x-(hi+lo)/2) < (hi-lo)/2 
}

That's about as fast as the .bincode hack, and is the implementation of the algorithm you were looking for. You can translate this to C or C++ and try if you get a speedup.

Comparison with other solutions:

x <- runif(1e6,1,10)
require(rbenchmark)
benchmark(
  in.interval(x, 3, 5),
  in.interval2(x, 3, 5),
  findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1,
  !is.na(.bincode(x, c(3, 5))),
  order='relative',
  columns=c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative")
) 

gives

                           test replications elapsed relative
4  !is.na(.bincode(x, c(3, 5)))          100    1.88    1.000
2         in.interval2(x, 3, 5)          100    1.95    1.037
3 findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1          100    3.42    1.819
1          in.interval(x, 3, 5)          100    3.54    1.883
8
  • The idea is sweet, but on my machine it's considerably slower than .bincode, and the Rcpp version behaves just like the best other Rcpp version that uses & internally. See the Gist for results (there it's test 7 and 8).
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:10
  • What about (x-lo)*(hi-x) > 0?
    – Roland
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:18
  • @Roland: (x-lo)*(x-hi) <= 0 might be even better. But I think I'll settle for .bincode unless someome comes up with an even faster option.
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:22
  • While I'm at it: Both your and Roland's approaches do not seem to allow testing left-inclusive-right-exclusive (or the other way round). .bincode can do everything except left-exclusive-right-exclusive (with the help of the include.lowest parameter).
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:26
  • True that indeed. But left-inclusive right-exclusive cannot be tested in one go, as you cannot rewrite the conditions into one condition. To do this, you need to treat both sides the same way (either inclusive or exclusive)
    – Joris Meys
    Dec 20, 2012 at 16:13
5

findInterval is faster than in.interval for long x.

library(microbenchmark)

set.seed(123L)
x <- runif(1e6, 1, 10)
in.interval <- function(x, lo, hi) (x > lo & x < hi)

microbenchmark(
    findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1L,
    in.interval(x, 3, 5),
    times=100)

with

Unit: milliseconds
                            expr      min       lq   median       uq      max
1 findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1L 23.40665 25.13308 25.17272 25.25361 27.04032
2           in.interval(x, 3, 5) 42.91647 45.51040 45.60424 45.75144 46.38389

Faster still if == 1L is not needed, and useful if the 'intervals' to be found are more than 1

> system.time(findInterval(x, 0:10))
   user  system elapsed 
  3.644   0.112   3.763 

If speed is of the essence, this C implementation is fast though intolerant of, e.g., integer rather than numeric arguments

library(inline)
in.interval_c <- cfunction(c(x="numeric", lo="numeric", hi="numeric"),
'    int len = Rf_length(x);
     double lower = REAL(lo)[0], upper = REAL(hi)[0],
            *xp = REAL(x);
     SEXP out = PROTECT(NEW_LOGICAL(len));
     int *outp = LOGICAL(out);

     for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i)
         outp[i] = (xp[i] - lower) * (xp[i] - upper) <= 0;

     UNPROTECT(1);
     return out;')

Timings for some solutions presented in other answers are

microbenchmark(
    findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1L,
    in.interval.abs(x, 3, 5),
    in.interval(x, 3, 5),
    in.interval_c(x, 3, 5),
    !is.na(.bincode(x, c(3, 5))),
    times=100)

with

Unit: milliseconds
                            expr       min        lq    median        uq
1 findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) == 1L 23.419117 23.495943 23.556524 23.670907
2       in.interval.abs(x, 3, 5) 12.018486 12.056290 12.093279 12.161213
3         in.interval_c(x, 3, 5)  1.619649  1.641119  1.651007  1.679531
4           in.interval(x, 3, 5) 42.946318 43.050058 43.171480 43.407930
5   !is.na(.bincode(x, c(3, 5))) 15.421340 15.468946 15.520298 15.600758
        max
1 26.360845
2 13.178126
3  2.785939
4 46.187129
5 18.558425

Revisiting the speed issue, in a file bin.cpp

#include <Rcpp.h>

using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
SEXP bin1(SEXP x, SEXP lo, SEXP hi)
{
    const int len = Rf_length(x);
    const double lower = REAL(lo)[0], upper = REAL(hi)[0];
    SEXP out = PROTECT(Rf_allocVector(LGLSXP, len));

    double *xp = REAL(x);
    int *outp = LOGICAL(out);
    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    outp[i] = (xp[i] - lower) * (xp[i] - upper) <= 0;

    UNPROTECT(1);
    return out;
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
LogicalVector bin2(NumericVector x, NumericVector lo, NumericVector hi)
{
    NumericVector xx(x);
    double lower = as<double>(lo);
    double upper = as<double>(hi); 

    LogicalVector out(x);
    for( int i=0; i < out.size(); i++ )
        out[i] = ( (xx[i]-lower) * (xx[i]-upper) ) <= 0;

    return out;
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
LogicalVector bin3(NumericVector x, const double lower, const double upper)
{
    const int len = x.size();
    LogicalVector out(len);

    for (int i=0; i < len; i++)
        out[i] = ( (x[i]-lower) * (x[i]-upper) ) <= 0;

    return out;
}

with timings

> library(Rcpp)
> sourceCpp("bin.cpp")
> microbenchmark(bin1(x, 3, 5), bin2(x, 3, 5), bin3(x, 3, 5),                   
+                in.interval_c(x, 3, 5), times=1000)                            
Unit: milliseconds                                                              
                    expr       min        lq    median        uq      max       
1          bin1(x, 3, 5)  1.546703  2.668171  2.785255  2.839225 144.9574       
2          bin2(x, 3, 5) 12.547456 13.583808 13.674477 13.792773 155.6594       
3          bin3(x, 3, 5)  2.238139  3.318293  3.357271  3.540876 144.1249       
4 in.interval_c(x, 3, 5)  1.545139  2.654809  2.767784  2.822722 143.7500       

with about equal parts speed-up coming from use of a constant len instead of out.size() as the loop bound, and allocating the logical vector without initializing it (LogicalVector(len), since it will be initialized in the loop).

6
  • I've embedded your solution into the gist at gist.github.com/4344844 . For 1e6 elements it works faster than the & approach, however using C++ still beats it by a factor of two.
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:31
  • duplication of large objects in Rcpp Dec 20, 2012 at 20:23
  • Now here's something baffling to me. The C solution you gave actually runs faster (about 2x) than a simple x < hi on my system (try adding x > lo & x < hi, x < hi to the benchmarks to see). How is that happening - I would think the underlying C implementation of operators in R would already be quite optimized? Or are the binary versions of R compiled in a 'safe' way compared to whatever might be going on when I compile that C function? Dec 20, 2012 at 22:15
  • 1
    @CauchyDistributedRV x < hi requires allocation of the same amount of memory (for the return logical) as my code, both functions need to iterate over all values, and likely the C compiler has optimized the body of my for loop to be many fewer operations than implied by the high-level syntax, so possibly the basic cost of the two loops is comparable. R will also do a lot of things we take for granted, e.g., dealing with NAs, recycling hi (in general, not just for the special case of length 1), checking for the need to coerce between data types, etc. Dec 21, 2012 at 1:29
  • @user946850 I looked into the speed differences a little, and added a section to my answer. Dec 22, 2012 at 16:50
4

If you can deal with NAs, you could use .bincode:

.bincode(c(2,4,6), c(3, 5))
[1] NA  1 NA

library(microbenchmark)
set.seed(42)
x = runif(1e8, 1, 10)
microbenchmark(in.interval(x, 3, 5),
               findInterval(x,  c(3, 5)),
               .bincode(x, c(3, 5)),
               times=5)

Unit: milliseconds
                      expr       min        lq    median       uq      max
1     .bincode(x, c(3, 5))  930.4842  934.3594  955.9276 1002.857 1047.348
2 findInterval(x, c(3, 5)) 1438.4620 1445.7131 1472.4287 1481.380 1551.419
3     in.interval(x, 3, 5) 2977.8460 3046.7720 3075.8381 3182.013 3288.020
4
  • sweet use of internal functions. You get the answer by !is.na(.bincode(...))
    – Joris Meys
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:39
  • 2
    .bincode converts its argument to integer so has surprising (in the present context) results -- .bincode(3.1, 3, 5) is 'NA'; test identity of results from each method. Dec 20, 2012 at 12:45
  • oops my bad, sorry about that. Dec 20, 2012 at 12:53
  • Works fine for flats, and is just slightly slower than the Rcpp-ed solution. Results in the Gist.
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:56
4

The main speedup I can find is through byte-compiling the function. Even an Rcpp solution (albeit using Rcpp sugar, and not a more drilled-down C solution) is slower than the compiled solution.

library( compiler )
library( microbenchmark )
library( inline )

in.interval <- function(x, lo, hi) (x > lo & x < hi)
in.interval2 <- cmpfun( in.interval )
in.interval3 <- function(x, lo, hi) {
  sapply( x, function(xx) { 
    xx > lo && xx < hi }
          )
}
in.interval4 <- cmpfun( in.interval3 )
in.interval5 <- rcpp( signature(x="numeric", lo="numeric", hi="numeric"), '
NumericVector xx(x);
double lower = Rcpp::as<double>(lo);
double upper = Rcpp::as<double>(hi);

return Rcpp::wrap( xx > lower & xx < upper );
')

x <- c(2, 4, 6)
lo <- 3
hi <- 5

microbenchmark(
  in.interval(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval2(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval3(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval4(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval5(x, lo, hi)
)

gives me

Unit: microseconds
                     expr    min      lq  median      uq    max
1  in.interval(x, lo, hi)  1.575  2.0785  2.5025  2.6560  7.490
2 in.interval2(x, lo, hi)  1.035  1.4230  1.6800  2.0705 11.246
3 in.interval3(x, lo, hi) 25.439 26.2320 26.7350 27.2250 77.541
4 in.interval4(x, lo, hi) 22.479 23.3920 23.8395 24.3725 33.770
5 in.interval5(x, lo, hi)  1.425  1.8740  2.2980  2.5565 21.598


EDIT: Following other comments, here's an even faster Rcpp solution, using the tricks with absolute values given:

library( compiler )
library( inline )
library( microbenchmark )

in.interval.oldRcpp <- rcpp( 
  signature(x="numeric", lo="numeric", hi="numeric"), '
    NumericVector xx(x);
    double lower = Rcpp::as<double>(lo);
    double upper = Rcpp::as<double>(hi);

    return Rcpp::wrap( (xx > lower) & (xx < upper) );
    ')

in.interval.abs <- rcpp( 
  signature(x="numeric", lo="numeric", hi="numeric"), '
    NumericVector xx(x);
    double lower = as<double>(lo);
    double upper = as<double>(hi); 

    LogicalVector out(x);
    for( int i=0; i < out.size(); i++ ) {
      out[i] = ( (xx[i]-lower) * (xx[i]-upper) ) <= 0;
    }
    return wrap(out);
    ')

in.interval.abs.sugar <- rcpp( 
  signature( x="numeric", lo="numeric", hi="numeric"), '
    NumericVector xx(x);
    double lower = as<double>(lo);
    double upper = as<double>(hi); 

    return wrap( ((xx-lower) * (xx-upper)) <= 0 );
    ')

x <- runif(1E5)
lo <- 0.5
hi <- 1

microbenchmark(
  in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval.abs(x, lo, hi),
  in.interval.abs.sugar(x, lo, hi)
)

all.equal( in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi), in.interval.abs(x, lo, hi) )
all.equal( in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi), in.interval.abs.sugar(x, lo, hi) )

gives me

1       in.interval.abs(x, lo, hi)  662.732  666.4855  669.939  690.6585 1580.707
2 in.interval.abs.sugar(x, lo, hi)  722.789  726.0920  728.795  742.6085 1671.093
3   in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi) 1870.784 1876.4890 1892.854 1935.0445 2859.025

> all.equal( in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi), in.interval.abs(x, lo, hi) )
[1] TRUE

> all.equal( in.interval.oldRcpp(x, lo, hi), in.interval.abs.sugar(x, lo, hi) )
[1] TRUE
8
  • 4
    Did you check what your functions return? They aren't the same; && only evaluates the first elements of its operands.
    – Hong Ooi
    Dec 20, 2012 at 11:06
  • Oops - you're exactly right. One could imagine wrapping the call within sapply or map but that's still slower than other solutions. Dec 20, 2012 at 11:22
  • I have put your code into a gist: gist.github.com/4344844. However, it does not compile on my system (Ubuntu 12.10, latest R from CRAN): Error in compileCode(f, code, language = language, verbose = verbose) : ..., error: no match for ‘operator&’ in ...
    – krlmlr
    Dec 20, 2012 at 11:46
  • @user946850 are you using the most up-to-date version of Rcpp? I believe that the & operator was added as syntactic sugar in Rcpp 0.10.0; see cran.r-project.org/web/packages/Rcpp/vignettes/Rcpp-sugar.pdf . FWIW, it compiles fine with me on Mac OS, R 2.15.2, Rcpp_0.10.1 . Dec 20, 2012 at 11:51
  • 1
    @user946850 I added a potential solution to the gist. Should compile with pre-0.10 Rcpp versions, but may be a tiny bit slower. Alternatively, you should be able to get the newest version from CRAN with install.packages("Rcpp", type="source") in an R session, I would imagine. Dec 20, 2012 at 12:09

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