11

I have a List<CustomPoint> points; which contains close to million objects. From this list I would like to get the List of objects that are occuring exactly twice. What would be the fastest way to do this? I would also be interested in a non-Linq option also since I might have to do this in C++ also.

public class CustomPoint
{
    public double X { get; set; }
    public double Y { get; set; }

    public CustomPoint(double x, double y)
    {
        this.X = x;
        this.Y = y;
    }
}

public class PointComparer : IEqualityComparer<CustomPoint>
{
    public bool Equals(CustomPoint x, CustomPoint y)
    {
        return ((x.X == y.X) && (y.Y == x.Y));
    }

    public int GetHashCode(CustomPoint obj)
    {
        int hash = 0;
        hash ^= obj.X.GetHashCode();
        hash ^= obj.Y.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}

based on this answer, i tried,

list.GroupBy(x => x).Where(x => x.Count() = 2).Select(x => x.Key).ToList(); 

but this is giving zero objects in the new list. Can someone guide me on this?

7
  • Where do you get the data from? Dec 20, 2012 at 12:02
  • @MichaelPerrenoud - these are geographical latitude and longitude values
    – vinayan
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:05
  • Yes, but where is the data being loaded from (e.g. SQL Server Database)? I'm asking because you mentioned it was close to a million objects and also that you may need to access it in C++ Dec 20, 2012 at 12:37
  • @MichaelPerrenoud - ok..I am reading these points from a shapefile(en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shapefile). I am using an application called Quantum GIS and its C++ API..
    – vinayan
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:55
  • 2
    You may or may not be aware of this, but comparing doubles for equality is usually not a good idea. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1398753/… Dec 20, 2012 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

9

You should implement Equals and GetHashCode in the class itself and not in the PointComparer

2
  • i implemented IEqualityComparer for the point class..it didn't work..i must be doing something awfully wrong
    – vinayan
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:23
  • No, it is Ok, but you can use in another way, but if you want to use equals and gethashcode methods, you have to use them on the main class and not on the IEqualityComparer
    – Saw
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:25
4

To get your code working, you need to pass an instance of your PointComparer as a second argument to GroupBy.

2
  • i tried points.GroupBy(new PointComparer()).Where(g => g.Count() == 2).Select(g => g.Key).ToList(); it doesn't compile
    – vinayan
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:10
  • Sorry, you need both the lambda and the new PointComparer() (two parameters).
    – Rawling
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:11
3

This method works for me:

public class PointCount
{
    public CustomPoint Point { get; set; }
    public int Count { get; set; }
}

private static IEnumerable<CustomPoint> GetPointsByCount(Dictionary<int, PointCount> pointcount, int count)
{
    return pointcount
                    .Where(p => p.Value.Count == count)
                    .Select(p => p.Value.Point);
}

private static Dictionary<int, PointCount> GetPointCount(List<CustomPoint> pointList)
{
    var allPoints = new Dictionary<int, PointCount>();

    foreach (var point in pointList)
    {
        int hash = point.GetHashCode();

        if (allPoints.ContainsKey(hash))
        {
            allPoints[hash].Count++;
        }
        else
        {
            allPoints.Add(hash, new PointCount { Point = point, Count = 1 });
        }
    }

    return allPoints;
}

Called like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<CustomPoint> list1 = CreateCustomPointList();

    var doubles = GetPointsByCount(GetPointCount(list1), 2);

    Console.WriteLine("Doubles:");
    foreach (var point in doubles)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("X: {0}, Y: {1}", point.X, point.Y);
    }
}

private static List<CustomPoint> CreateCustomPointList()
{
    var result = new List<CustomPoint>();

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++)
        {
            result.Add(new CustomPoint(i, j));
        }
    }

    result.Add(new CustomPoint(1, 3));
    result.Add(new CustomPoint(3, 3));
    result.Add(new CustomPoint(0, 2));

    return result;
}

CustomPoint implementation:

public class CustomPoint
{
    public double X { get; set; }
    public double Y { get; set; }

    public CustomPoint(double x, double y)
    {
        this.X = x;
        this.Y = y;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        var other = obj as CustomPoint;

        if (other == null)
        {
            return base.Equals(obj);
        }

        return ((this.X == other.X) && (this.Y == other.Y));
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 23;
        hash = hash * 31 + this.X.GetHashCode();
        hash = hash * 31 + this.Y.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}

It prints:

Doubles:
X: 0, Y: 2
X: 1, Y: 3
X: 3, Y: 3

As you see in GetPointCount(), I create a dictionary per unique CustomPoint (by hash). Then I insert a PointCount object containing a reference to the CustomPoint which starts at a Count of 1, and every time the same point is encountered, the Count is increased.

Finally in GetPointsByCount I return the CustomPoints in the dictionary where PointCount.Count == count, in your case 2.

Please also note I updated the GetHashCode() method, since your one returns the same for point (1,2) and (2,1). If you do want that, feel free to restore your own hashing method. You will have to test the hashing function though, because it's hard to uniquely hash two numbers into one. That depends on the range of numbers used though, so you should implement a hash function that fits your own needs.

8
  • This is the same of my answer, but with a code, it doesn't need code, he can write the code very easily, thenx for your time
    – Saw
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:29
  • 3
    @MSakherSawan "This is the same of my answer" - no it is not, I implemented the GetDoubles() method which, contrary to your answer, does answer the question.
    – CodeCaster
    Dec 20, 2012 at 12:30
  • 2
    @flindeberg that is true, but you'll have to synchronize the dictionary access to prevent concurrency problems. Don't know if you'll gain much benefit from that.
    – CodeCaster
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:08
  • 1
    @CodeCaster I was thinking more in terms of map-reduce :) But it of course depends on the composition of the original data, if there are alot of similar points map-reduce would really help, but if there isn't it really wouldn't.
    – flindeberg
    Dec 20, 2012 at 13:19
  • 1
    @vinayan CodeCaster's implementation of GetHashCode deliberately avoids doing that because usually it's a bad idea; if you want it to be the case then simply replace his GetHashCode with the one from your question.
    – Rawling
    Dec 21, 2012 at 8:09

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