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I have Javascript that people are including in their page. In my Javascript I have a version of jQuery (1.8 for sake of easy reference) that is sectioned off into its own namespace, and referenced via a global variable (but not one of the two default vars of "$" or "jQuery"). This allows users to have jQuery in their page and have it not interfere with the stuff I'm doing internally in my functions.

So we have one page that has jQuery already (1.4), and everything works fine, except that the user and my code are both listening to "click" events on elements, and theirs is going first, so on the few events they do that return false, jQuery stops propagation and my event never gets triggered. I need my event to go first. The user is expecting my onClick functionality to still work.

Now I know that jQuery keeps its own order of events internally through the _data() object, and through this it is possible to unbind existing events, bind my event, then rebind the existing events, but that only applies to objects bound through that instance of jQuery. I'd rather not just blindly look for the jQuery object in hopes that the conflict was introduced by a user's own version of jQuery. After all what happens when a user binds the event not through jQuery? Trying to manipulate the existing jQuery object in the page isn't a good solution.

I know that, depending on browser, they are using addEventListener/removeEventListener or attachEvent/detachEvent. If only I could get a listing of the already added events, I could rebind them in the order I wanted, but I can't find out how. Looking through the DOM via Chrome inspect I don't see onclick bound anywhere (not on the object, not on window or document either).

I'm having the darndest time trying to figure out just exactly where jQuery binds its listening. To be able to control the order of its own events, jQuery must blanketly listen somewhere and then fire off its own functions right? If I could figure out where that's done I might get some insight into how to ensure my event is always first. Or maybe there's some Javascript API I haven't been able to find on Google.

Any suggestions?

7
  • 1
    No, it is not possible to get the events bound by addEventListener from the DOM. The only reference you have to them is jQuery's data object. – Bergi Dec 20 '12 at 20:34
  • Btw, the "magic" happens here – Bergi Dec 20 '12 at 20:38
  • 1
    Why are users stopping event propagation? – Aaron Kurtzhals Dec 20 '12 at 20:41
  • Ty Bergi! That's what I was afraid of, it seems when jQuery removes events it's through its internal storage of the previous added events, here and here. I might just be boned. – Scott Dec 20 '12 at 20:42
  • Aaron, in their case they are using a link (<a href...>) plus background-image i believe to make it look like a button. They then popup the contents in a custom dialog, but don't want the page navigation to actually continue, as it would overwrite the whole page. I know it seems bad but hey, it's their page. – Scott Dec 20 '12 at 20:45
22

We solved this by just adding a little jQuery extension that inserts events at the head of the event chain:

$.fn.bindFirst = function(name, fn) {
  var elem, handlers, i, _len;
  this.bind(name, fn);
  for (i = 0, _len = this.length; i < _len; i++) {
    elem = this[i];
    handlers = jQuery._data(elem).events[name.split('.')[0]];
    handlers.unshift(handlers.pop());
  }
};

Then, to bind your event:

$(".foo").bindFirst("click", function() { /* Your handler */ });

Easy peasy!

3
  • 1
    While a useful function, I think that only would insert my event at the beginning of the events which were queued using my version (1.8) of jQuery, but the events added elsewhere in the page not through my jQuery could still take precedence. – Scott Dec 20 '12 at 20:52
  • 2
    Hrm, I'd missed that. That's probably correct. Is there a reason you're using multiple concurrent versions of jQuery in the same page? To the best of my knowledge, you can't get a list of bound events directly from the browser, though. – Chris Heald Dec 20 '12 at 20:53
  • Yes our code is a javascript library meant to run on pages with or without jQuery. Their website merely includes our code and happens to also be running jQuery themselves. The "not able to get list of bound events from browser" I think might just be the solution to this problem. The only other thing I can think of is wrapping the addEventListener/attachEvent functions as early in the page as I can, and that gets messy. – Scott Dec 20 '12 at 20:59
9

As Bergi and Chris Heald said in the comments, it turns out there's no way to get at the existing events from the DOM, and no method to insert events "first". They are fired in the order they were inserted by design, and hidden by design. As a few posters mentioned you have access to the ones added through the same instance of jQuery that you're using via jQuery's data, but that's it.

There is one other case where you can run before an event that was bound before your code ran, and that's if they used the "onclick" HTML attribute. In that case you can write a wrapper function, as nothingisnecessary pointed out in a rather over-the-top toned comment below. While this wouldn't help in the instance of the original question I asked, and it's now very rare for events to be bound this way (most people and frameworks use addEvent or attachEventListener underneath now), it is one scenario in which you can solve the issue of "running first", and since a lot of people visit this question looking for answers now, I thought I'd make sure the answer is complete.

2
  • fiddle: jsfiddle.net/uxdhzfz1 ... and to add jQuery into the mix, augment with Chris Heald's answer.. – nothingisnecessary Dec 22 '16 at 19:34
  • I covered this in another comment in this thread, but I guess I'll move it up into the question: While I also agree that I wouldn't want to be overriding the default implementations of these functions, it still wouldn't have solved the original problem. If I could run early enough to run before other people called addEventListener, then I could have just called addEventListener right then and been before the listeners that were added later, instead of overriding the default implementation. – Scott Dec 28 '16 at 16:22
3

I encounter an opposite situation where I was asked to include a library, which uses event.stopImmediatePropagation() on an element, to our website. So some of my event handlers are skipped. Here is what I do (as answered here):

<span onclick="yourEventHandler(event)">Button</span>

Warning: this is not the recommended way to bind events, other developers may murder you for this.

1
  • 1
    This is correct only of "onclick" was added to the element before the other event was registered. But if you add "onclick" later it will be executed last – Ariel Deil Feb 19 '19 at 17:04
1

Found it easiest to add addListener and removeListener methods to document (as that's only where I need them - I suppose you can use Element.prototype and this instead). Only one "real" listener is added per type, and it's just a func to call the actual listeners in order. The eventListeners dictionary is added to document (so can mess with the handler or order).

[edit] I think the correct answer for most cases is to use the 3rd argument of addEventListener: https://stackoverflow.com/a/29923421. The answer below ignores the argument (on purpose).

[edit] Updated code to only add one extra property: document.eventHandlers + modified naming.

// Storage.
document.eventListeners             = {};   // { type: [ handlerFunc, listenerFuncs ] }

// Add event listener - returns index.
document.addListener                = (type, listener, atIndex) => {
    // Get info.
    const listening                 = document.eventListeners[type];
    // Add to existing.
    if (listening) {
        // Clean up.
        atIndex                     = atIndex || 0;
        const listeners             = listening[1];     // Array of funcs.
        // Already has.
        const iExists               = listeners.indexOf(listener);
        if (iExists !== -1) {
            // Nothing to do.
            if (iExists === atIndex)
                return              atIndex;
            // Remove from old position.
            listeners.splice(atIndex, 1);
        }
        // Add (supporting one cycle of negatives).
        const nListeners            = listeners.length;
        if (atIndex > nListeners)
            atIndex                 = nListeners;
        else if (atIndex < 0)
            atIndex                 = Math.max(0, atIndex + nListeners + 1);
        listeners.splice(atIndex, 0, listener);
    }
    // New one.
    else {
        // Handler func.
        const handler               = (...args) => {
            const listening         = document.eventListeners[type];
            if (listening) {
                const listeners     = listening[1];     // Array of funcs.
                for (const listener of listeners)
                    listener(...args);
            }
        };
        // Update dictionary.
        document.eventListeners[type]   = [ handler, [ listener ] ];
        // Add listener.
        document.addEventListener(type, handler);
        // First one.
        atIndex                     = 0;
    }
    // Return index.
    return                          atIndex;
};

// Remove event listener - returns index (-1 if not found).
document.removeListener             = (type, listener) => {
    // Get info.
    const listening                 = document.eventListeners[type];
    if (!listening)
        return                      -1;
    // Check if exists.
    const listeners                 = listening[1];
    const iExists                   = listeners.indexOf(listener);
    if (iExists !== -1) {
        // Remove listener.
        listeners.splice(iExists, 1);
        // If last one.
        if (!listeners.length) {
            // Remove listener.
            const handlerFunc       = listening[0];
            document.removeEventListener(type, handlerFunc);
            // Update dictionary.
            delete                  document.eventListeners[type];
        }
    }
    // Return index.
    return                          iExists;
}
1
  • I think the formatting makes it easier to look at code from further away (as a whole).. inspired by dictionary declarations and math equations ;) Unfortunately works nicely only in some editors (especially in SublimeText). – takaturre Nov 19 '20 at 15:21
0

Just so it's said, I think this might be possible if you override the native implementations of these functions. This is BAD practice - very bad practice when developing a library to alter native implementations, because it can easily conflict with other libraries.

However, for completeness, here's one possibility (completely untested, just demonstrating the general concept):

// override createElement()
var temp = document.createElement;
document.createElement = function() {
    // create element
    var el = document.createElement.original.apply(document, arguments);

    // override addEventListener()
    el.addEventListenerOriginal = el.addEventListener;
    el._my_stored_events = [];

    // add custom functions
    el.addEventListener = addEventListenerCustom;
    el.addEventListenerFirst = addEventListenerFirst;
    // ...
};
document.createElement.original = temp;

// define main event listeners
function myMainEventListeners(type) {
    if (myMainEventListeners.all[type] === undefined) {
        myMainEventListeners.all[type] = function() {
            for (var i = 0; i < this._my_stored_events.length; i++) {
                var event = this._my_stored_events[i];
                if (event.type == type) {
                    event.listener.apply(this, arguments);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return myMainEventListeners.all[type];
}
myMainEventListeners.all = {};

// define functions to mess with the event list
function addEventListenerCustom(type, listener, useCapture, wantsUntrusted) {
    // register handler in personal storage list
    this._my_stored_events.push({
        'type' : type,
        'listener' : listener
    });

    // register custom event handler
    if (this.type === undefined) {
        this.type = myMainEventListeners(type);
    }
}

function addEventListenerFirst(type, listener) {
    // register handler in personal storage list
    this._my_stored_events.push({
        'type' : type,
        'listener' : listener
    });

    // register custom event handler
    if (this.type === undefined) {
        this.type = myMainEventListeners(type);
    }
}

// ...

A lot more work would need to be done in this regard to truly lock this down, and again, it's best not to modify native libraries. But it's a useful mental exercise that helps to demonstrate the flexibility JavaScript provides in solving problems like this.

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    While I also agree that I wouldn't want to be overriding the default implementations of these functions, it still wouldn't have solved the original problem. If I could run early enough to run before other people called addEventListener, then I could have just called addEventListener right then and been before the listeners that were added later. – Scott Aug 3 '15 at 17:56

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