10

I am using Visual Studio 10 within a C# MVC appliction.

I have a qustion on a .dll reference. I am using a third party reference called Ionic.Zip.dll. What I am not sure about is that it currently points to a location on my C: drive. How and what is the best practice for me to put this .dll so that when I check in the project, others can also see this .dll without it blowing up.

Thanks

  • Set "Copy to Output Directory" to True so it gets put in the bin. – vcsjones Dec 21 '12 at 20:16
  • Where is the Copy to Output Directory. I do not see it. – Nate Pet Dec 21 '12 at 20:24
  • possible duplicate of c# Reference for DotNetZip – EdChum Dec 22 '12 at 0:06
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I would typically put a Library folder in my application structure, place the 3rd party dll in that folder, and then reference that dll. Then ensure that the library folder is checked into your source control. Now, anyone that pulls your source will have the required dll.

  • The option whether to commit the library folder is depends on the project convention. I don't usually commit anything into source control if your team don't manage the library in your project. Moreover third party library tends be large, it can grows up to couple MB. Which could slow down the download process. The alternative is to write a setup document then ensure the library can be downloaded somewhere manually by everyone during the setup. Or you may write the build script to automate this project building process. But it's quite complicated. – Yeo Oct 30 '15 at 10:57
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Even easier...simply add a reference to DotNetZip via NuGet, the Visual Studio Package Manager:

http://nuget.org/packages/DotNetZip

And you shouldn't have to worry about it.

  • What if there is no Nuget package but just a 3rd party lib provided to you. So far, I have seen same problem as described by Nate and the only solution seam to be what @csuroski recommended in his answer for such cases – pixel May 22 at 17:05
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The best way is to use Nuget.

But in some cases Nuget is not available or not getting compative, so as our friend says, its better put a Library folder in application structure, place the 3rd party dll in that folder, and then reference that dll. Then ensure that the library folder is checked into source control. Now, anyone that pulls source will have the required dll.

  • Agree, this seam to be the only viable option in cases where no nuget is available for a 3rd party library – pixel May 22 at 17:06

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