22

First, I am new to C++. I open a header file for each and every C++ class. Now I am in a need of creating an abstract class. Following is my code

Magic.h

#pragma once
class Magic
{
public:
    Magic(void);
    ~Magic(void);
    virtual void display()=0;
};

Magic.cpp

#include "Magic.h"


Magic::Magic(void)
{
}


Magic::~Magic(void)
{
}

Now, as you know I can't add following to the cpp file.

Magic::display()
{
}

So, do I really need a .cpp file for an Abstract class? Or else, am I incorrectly calling display() in .cpp file?

19

You don't need an implementation file. Just define all the required members inline (and don't define the pure virtual ones if you don't need to).

class Magic
{
public:
    Magic(void) {};
    ~Magic(void) {};
    virtual void display()=0;
};
  • without pure virtuals, we can't call a class as "Abstract Class" right? Because then we can create objects of it. – PeakGen Dec 22 '12 at 9:13
  • Yes, an abstract class has at least one pure-virtual function. Doesn't mean you can't provide an implementation for that function though (it remains abstract even if you provide one). – Mat Dec 22 '12 at 9:16
  • OK. But when I am trying to extend that class using Visual Studio class wizard, it says "Base class Majic not found in the project". now what? – PeakGen Dec 22 '12 at 10:35
  • That has nothing to do with abstract class or not. You're probably missing #include "Magic.h" somewhere. – Mat Dec 22 '12 at 10:36
  • @Mat Destructors of classes containing pure virtual functions should always be virtual too. This is to take into account of having a Base pointer so that when deletion happens the correct destructor is called. – Moshe Rabaev Jan 11 at 19:19
10

If you're following the 2-files-per-class and one-class-in-each-set-of-files conventions, it would be better to have a .cpp file even if you're writing an abstract class.

There are a few other advantages apart from maintaining consistency: having a .cpp or implementation file gives you room to expand in the future, if you were to add a non-virtual common behaviour to your family of classes, the base class is the right place to add it. Also minor edits in the .cpp file will result in far lesser compilation time than those in a .h which are included from multiple places.

Conventions aside, you can very well place a class (abstract or not) in just a single .h file. Libraries such as the STL do this all the time.

  • 2
    +1. Another reason I do follow this convention is to check if Magic.h compiles cleanly. Magic.cpp would contain just the single include. This prevents hard-to-find errors where Magic.h depends on another class, fails to include or forward declare it, and usually picks it up indirectly. The result is that Foo.cpp may compile but Bar.cpp not, and you'd overlook Magic.h as a cause because it's common to the two. – MSalters Dec 22 '12 at 13:34
3

You don't need a source file for abstract classes (i.e interface).

Furthermore, if you have a virtual method of any kind, you should add a virtual destructor as well (or make the destructor protected). Also you can simply let the compiler generate a default constructor for you. If you want a pure virtual function (that the derived class MUST override) you should not add a function body so leave the void Magic::display() {} away. And since you have to provide a body for the destructor, you can define it inline:

struct Magic {
    // use default constructor
    virtual void display() =0; // pure virtual function
    virtual ~Magic(); // virtual destructor
};

inline Magic::~Magic()
{
}

or even simpler:

#pragma once

struct Magic {
    virtual void display() =0;
    virtual ~Magic() {}
};
3

No, you can add a function definition for pure virtual function but normally you don't need to provide function definition for pure virtual function. Note, you are missing function return type for Magic::display(), should be:

void Magic::display()
{
}
1

If your class contains only virtual methods, it actually defines an interface. An interface by nature represents a contract between 2 entities, without any implementation dependency. Therefore as a good design practice not only you don't need the .cpp file, it's better without it.

Since you're using VS, you can also use the MS extension __interface for interfaces instead of classes with pure virtual methods (beware, it's not portable).

  • But I can't extend it! It says "Base class not found in this project" when I am trying to extend that in "Sp" class using visual studio class creation wizard – PeakGen Dec 22 '12 at 10:36
  • @Sepala I do not understand what are you talking about – SomeWittyUsername Dec 22 '12 at 10:42

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