25

Take a look at this class:

TTest = class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer);overload;  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;

Now when we want to use the class:

var  
  test:  TTest;  
begin  
  test:= TTest.Create; //this constructor is still visible and usable!  
end;

Can anyone help me with hiding this constructor?

5
  • Why do you want to? What are you trying to achieve? Dec 22 '12 at 13:33
  • 1
    +1. I thought this had been asked about before, but the only question I found wasn't expressed nearly as succinctly as this. Dec 22 '12 at 13:33
  • 1
    @Marjan Venema:It's obvious that I want to make a standard class, and my class shouldn't have this default constructor.
    – Javid
    Dec 22 '12 at 13:43
  • 1
    I tend not to fight the language/framework I am working with. Just declare it with reintroduce (effectively hiding the default one). Have it throw an exception and/or mark it deprecated? If the compiler accepts the deprecated on it, then you will get compile time warnings and otherwise run time exceptions. But I see David has just expanded his answer with some interesting ideas. Dec 22 '12 at 13:46
  • Deprecated is quite nice. You can get the compiler to block on that. Dec 22 '12 at 13:50
23

So long as you have overloaded constructors named Create, you cannot hide the parameterless TObject constructor when deriving from TObject.

This is discussed here: http://www.yanniel.info/2011/08/hide-tobject-create-constructor-delphi.html

If you are prepared to put another class between your class and TObject you can use Andy Hausladen's trick:

TNoParameterlessContructorObject = class(TObject)
strict private
  constructor Create;
end;

TTest = class(TNoParameterlessContructorObject)
public
  constructor Create(A:Integer);overload;  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;
4
  • Is there something special about Create or TObject, or does this rule generalize to all overloaded methods with the same name as non-overloaded, non-virtual base methods? Dec 22 '12 at 13:36
  • 3
    It is general. Any overloaded method in a derived class (and that is every class) automatically makes the inherited method overloaded, too.
    – Uwe Raabe
    Dec 22 '12 at 13:41
  • @Rob So far as I can tell, there's nothing special about constructors, Create, TObject. The same behaviour can be reproduces with ordinary methods. Dec 22 '12 at 13:42
  • Note that you can still do: inherited Create; in descendant classes.
    – Toby
    Oct 2 '17 at 19:08
12

You can hide the inherited Create by just introducing a non overloaded Create. As you need two overloaded Create, you can either merge those into one Create with an optional second parameter:

TTest = class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer; B: Integer = 0); 
end;

This will give a compiler warning, signalling that you're hiding the default parameterless constructor. To get rid of the warning you can declare the hiding constructor like so:

TTest = class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer; B: Integer = 0); reintroduce;
end;

or, if this is not feasible, you can introduce an intermediate class introducing the first create and then the final class with the overloaded second one:

preTest = class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer); reintroduce;
end;

TTest = class(preTest)  
public  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;
1
  • 3
    Ok, I'm a bit late to the discussion, but the first code snippet will not cause a warning, because TObject.Create is not virtual or dynamic. That is also why reintroduce has no effect and is not needed at all. Apr 11 '16 at 13:45
2

Another option is to use the deprecated keyword and raise an exception at runtime.

TTest = class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create; overload; deprecated 'Parameterless constructor is not Supported for a TTest class';
  constructor Create(const A: Integer); overload;  
  constructor Create(const A, B: Integer); overload;  
end;

implementation

constructor TTest.Create;
begin
  raise Exception.Create('Parameterless constructor is not Supported for a TTest class.');
end;
1

Through the two inheritance, user creation of TMySingleton class can be prevented from design time rather than runtime.

unit MySingleton;

interface

uses System.Classes, System.SysUtils;

type
  // Constructor Block external access
  THideConstructor = class abstract
  strict protected
    constructor Create; virtual; abstract;
  end;

  // Switching the access to the Create function THideConstructor in TObject through the constructor Overloading
  // Declaring Create Method as a procedure to prevent class call-TMySingle.Create('string') call impossible
  TOverloadConstructor = class(THideConstructor)
  public
    procedure Create(s: string); reintroduce; overload; deprecated 'null method';
  end;

  TMySingleton = class sealed(TOverloadConstructor)
  private
    class var MyObj: TMySingleton;
  strict protected
    // Hiding TOverloadConstructor.Create(s: string);
    // Implement THideConstructor.Create
    constructor Create; override;
  public
    class function Obj: TMySingleton;
    function Echo(const value: string): String;

    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

implementation

{ TMySingleton }

constructor TMySingleton.Create;
begin
  // TODO
end;

destructor TMySingleton.Destroy;
begin
   Self.MyObj := nil;
   inherited;
end;

function TMySingleton.Echo(const value: string): String;
begin
  result := value;
end;

class function TMySingleton.Obj: TMySingleton;
begin
  if MyObj = nil then
    MyObj := Self.Create;
  result := MyObj;
end;

{ TOverloadContructor }

procedure TOverloadConstructor.Create(s: string);
begin
  // null method
end;

initialization

TMySingleton.MyObj := nil;

finalization

if Assigned(TMySingleton.MyObj) then
  FreeAndNil(TMySingleton.MyObj);

end.

If the user

var
  Singleton: TMySingleton;
begin
  Singleton := TMySingleton.Create;

Design-time error occurs.

[dcc32 Error] Unit1.pas(33): E2625 Private member 'THideConstructor.Create' is inaccessible here MySingleton.pas(11): Related method: constructor Create;

enter image description here

Also, you can't see any autocomplete hints named Create.

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