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Possible Duplicate:
Mysql Like Case Sensitive

Mysql ignores case for its LIKE comparisons.

How can you force it to perform case-sensitive LIKE comparisons?

marked as duplicate by Andy Ray, Kate Gregory, Ed Heal, Andy Lester, Leigh Dec 23 '12 at 8:31

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  • 1
    I won't downvote or close-vote as I can't actually find anything worthy of those votes. I do however agree with Andy, the answer could have been found more quickly with a little web search. I would call it "laziness", but 61.3k rep doesn't say lazy. Perhaps overflow-holic – James Webster Dec 22 '12 at 23:32
  • @JamesWebster OK, fess up time. I'm trying to get the "answer your own question" hat. Lame, and yes SO-holic. If it doesn't score a vote within a couple of minutes, I'll close it :) even so, I thought the question had merit – Bohemian Dec 22 '12 at 23:38
  • @AndyRay five years later, using Google brings up this answer first :) – Kip Jan 26 '18 at 18:21
126

Use LIKE BINARY:

mysql> SELECT 'abc' LIKE 'ABC';
    -> 1
mysql> SELECT 'abc' LIKE BINARY 'ABC';
    -> 0
  • 4
    This is a better way – Weltkind May 23 '14 at 12:32
  • @Weltkind Why is it better? (Not saying I agree or disagree, just curious why you say that) – Kip Jan 26 '18 at 18:18
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    @Kip it's better IMHO because it doesn't presuppose any charset and works with any collation. It just does a straightforward "exact match" which everybody understands. It's also easier to remember (just remember one keyword: BINARY) and easier code (you don't have to remember valid charset names like utf8_bin) – Bohemian Jan 26 '18 at 18:55
  • A bit out of topic, but If you're learning SQL injection (specifically blind-based injection attacks) then I guess this is the only way to perform case sensitive comparison; things like COLLATE will mess up the query due to presence of double quotes. – Mayank Sharma Jan 4 at 16:10
32

Another alternative is to use COLLATE,

SELECT *
FROM table1
WHERE columnName like 'a%' COLLATE utf8_bin;
  • 1
    Nice. This opens up opportunity to do a custom match using a custom collation (although completely non portable, still if you need it, you need it – Bohemian Dec 23 '12 at 1:31
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    Doesn't work. The results are case insensitive – Nick Jul 23 '14 at 16:28
  • @Nick it is working for me. WHERE Prompt LIKE '%ElasticSearch%' COLLATE utf8_bin is returning ElasticSearch but not Elasticsearch (difference in casing of S). – Kip Jan 26 '18 at 18:18

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