52

I have a simple annotated controller similar to this one:

@Controller
public class MyController {
  @RequestMapping("/{id}.html")
  public String doSomething(@PathVariable String id, Model model) {
    // do something
    return "view";
  }
}

and I want to test it with an unit test like this:

public class MyControllerTest {
  @Test
  public void test() {
    MockHttpServletRequest request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
    request.setRequestURI("/test.html");
    new AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter()
      .handle(request, new MockHttpServletResponse(), new MyController());
    // assert something
  }
}

The problem is that AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter.handler() method throws an exception:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: Could not find @PathVariable [id] in @RequestMapping
at org.springframework.web.servlet.mvc.annotation.AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter$ServletHandlerMethodInvoker.resolvePathVariable(AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter.java:642)
at org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.support.HandlerMethodInvoker.resolvePathVariable(HandlerMethodInvoker.java:514)
at org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.support.HandlerMethodInvoker.resolveHandlerArguments(HandlerMethodInvoker.java:262)
at org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.support.HandlerMethodInvoker.invokeHandlerMethod(HandlerMethodInvoker.java:146)
37

As of Spring 3.2, there is a proper way to test this, in an elegant and easy way. You will be able to do things like this:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@WebAppConfiguration
@ContextConfiguration("servlet-context.xml")
public class SampleTests {

  @Autowired
  private WebApplicationContext wac;

  private MockMvc mockMvc;

  @Before
  public void setup() {
    this.mockMvc = webAppContextSetup(this.wac).build();
  }

  @Test
  public void getFoo() throws Exception {
    this.mockMvc.perform(get("/foo").accept("application/json"))
        .andExpect(status().isOk())
        .andExpect(content().mimeType("application/json"))
        .andExpect(jsonPath("$.name").value("Lee"));
  }
}

For further information, take a look at http://blog.springsource.org/2012/11/12/spring-framework-3-2-rc1-spring-mvc-test-framework/

  • 4
    in @Before this.mockMvc = MockMvcBuilders.webAppContextSetup(this.wac).build(); – Marcin Wasiluk Feb 14 '14 at 14:37
  • @MarcinWasiluk Thanks for the comment. Yes, MockMVC is a framework that, as the linked documentation states, heavily relies on static imports for improved readability, that is why I omitted that in my code sample. – Clint Eastwood Feb 24 '14 at 15:56
  • 9
    Well, adding them here so nobody else has to do the same digging. import static org.springframework.test.web.servlet.request.MockMvcRequestBuilders.get; import static org.springframework.test.web.servlet.result.MockMvcResultMatchers.content; import static org.springframework.test.web.servlet.result.MockMvcResultMatchers.jsonPath; import static org.springframework.test.web.servlet.result.MockMvcResultMatchers.status; import static org.springframework.test.web.servlet.setup.MockMvcBuilders.webAppContextSetup; – eis Oct 8 '15 at 9:22
  • 2
    and mimeType() is actually contentType(), at least in my version. – eis Oct 8 '15 at 9:29
46

I'd call what you're after an integration test based on the terminology in the Spring reference manual. How about doing something like:

import static org.springframework.test.web.ModelAndViewAssert.*;

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration({/* include live config here
    e.g. "file:web/WEB-INF/application-context.xml",
    "file:web/WEB-INF/dispatcher-servlet.xml" */})
public class MyControllerIntegrationTest {

    @Inject
    private ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    private MockHttpServletRequest request;
    private MockHttpServletResponse response;
    private HandlerAdapter handlerAdapter;
    private MyController controller;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
       request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
       response = new MockHttpServletResponse();
       handlerAdapter = applicationContext.getBean(HandlerAdapter.class);
       // I could get the controller from the context here
       controller = new MyController();
    }

    @Test
    public void testDoSomething() throws Exception {
       request.setRequestURI("/test.html");
       final ModelAndView mav = handlerAdapter.handle(request, response, 
           controller);
       assertViewName(mav, "view");
       // assert something
    }
}

For more information I've written a blog entry about integration testing Spring MVC annotations.

  • 2
    What if my configuration is in Java classes not in xml files? – zygimantus Mar 7 '17 at 11:12
10

A promising framework for testing Spring MVC https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-test-mvc

  • 1
    this is definitively the way to go - to bad it depends on Spring 3.1 – Otto Allmendinger Nov 17 '11 at 12:59
  • 2
    See also: jira.springsource.org/browse/SPR-9211 - vote if of interest. :-) – David Victor Mar 12 '12 at 15:36
  • Thank you very much. There is Spring 3.1.4 in our project. I would like to use at least 3.2 (because 3.1.4 doesn't contain stuff for testing REST handlers). Perhaps with aid of spring-test-mvc you pointed to I can do my job. – flaz14 Jan 13 '17 at 11:37
3

The exception message refers to a "feed" variable, which isn't present in your sample code, it's likely being caused by something you haven't shown us.

Also, your test is testing Spring and your own code. Is this really what you want to do?

It's better to assume that Spring works (which it does), and just test your own class, i.e. call MyController.doSomething() directly. That's one benefit of the annotation approach - you don't need to use mock requests and responses, you just use domain POJOs.

  • Sorry, [feed] was typo, should be [id] instead. In this particular test I need to test the View returned by hierarchy of ViewResolvers. Spring works, but only when is properly configured... – martiner Sep 9 '09 at 20:41
  • That's correct, but that's also beyond the scope of unit tests. Using a AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter in your test does not guarantee that the controller will work in your app for real. If you want to check your MVC behaviour, you need to write functional tests (try HtmlUnit). – skaffman Sep 9 '09 at 20:52
3

Provided you are using Spring 3.0.x.

Here I suggest a merger of Emil and scarba05 answers using spring-test not spring-test-mvc. Please skip this answer and refer to spring-test-mvc examples if you are using Spring 3.2.x or later

MyControllerWithParameter.java

@Controller
public class MyControllerWithParameter {
@RequestMapping("/testUrl/{pathVar}/some.html")
public String passOnePathVar(@PathVariable String pathVar, ModelMap model){
    model.addAttribute("SomeModelAttribute",pathVar);
    return "viewName";
}
}

MyControllerTest.java

import static org.springframework.test.web.ModelAndViewAssert.assertViewName;
import java.util.HashMap;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.mock.web.MockHttpServletRequest;
import org.springframework.mock.web.MockHttpServletResponse;
import org.springframework.test.context.ContextConfiguration;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner;
import org.springframework.test.web.ModelAndViewAssert;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.HandlerAdapter;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.HandlerMapping;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.ModelAndView;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.mvc.annotation.AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter;

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = 
    {"file:src\\main\\webapp\\WEB-INF\\spring\\services\\servlet-context.xml" 
    })
public class MyControllerTest {

private MockHttpServletRequest request;
private MockHttpServletResponse response;
private HandlerAdapter handlerAdapter;

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {
    request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
    response = new MockHttpServletResponse();
    this.handlerAdapter = applicationContext.getBean(AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter.class);
}

//  Container beans
private MyControllerWithParameter myController;
private ApplicationContext applicationContext;
public ApplicationContext getApplicationContext() {
    return applicationContext;
}
@Autowired
public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) {
    this.applicationContext = applicationContext;
}
public MyControllerWithParameter getMyController() {
    return myController;
}
@Autowired
public void setMyController(MyControllerWithParameter myController) {
    this.myController = myController;
}

@Test
public void test() throws Exception {
    request.setRequestURI("/testUrl/Irrelavant_Value/some.html");
    HashMap<String, String> pathvars = new HashMap<String, String>();
    // Populate the pathVariable-value pair in a local map
    pathvars.put("pathVar", "Path_Var_Value");
    // Assign the local map to the request attribute concerned with the handler mapping 
    request.setAttribute(HandlerMapping.URI_TEMPLATE_VARIABLES_ATTRIBUTE, pathvars);

    final ModelAndView modelAndView = this.handlerAdapter.handle(request, response, myController);

    ModelAndViewAssert.assertAndReturnModelAttributeOfType(modelAndView, "SomeModelAttribute", String.class);
    ModelAndViewAssert.assertModelAttributeValue(modelAndView, "SomeModelAttribute", "Path_Var_Value");
    ModelAndViewAssert.assertViewName(modelAndView, "viewName");
}

}

  • Can you please attach source of servlet-context.xml. We are using Spring 3.1.x and I don't know how to configure Spring for test. – Amir Pashazadeh Sep 29 '13 at 14:10
  • You can use Spring 3.2 test framework if you added spring-test-mvc maven artifact. If you want to use my answer, refer to the answer stackoverflow.com/questions/12902247/… – Sym-Sym Sep 30 '13 at 13:12
2

I've found that you can manually insert a PathVariable mapping into the request object. This is distinctly non-ideal but appears to work. In your example, something like:

@Test
public void test() {
    MockHttpServletRequest request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
    request.setRequestURI("/test.html");
    HashMap<String, String> pathvars = new HashMap<String, String>();
    pathvars.put("id", "test");
    request.setAttribute(HandlerMapping.URI_TEMPLATE_VARIABLES_ATTRIBUTE, pathvars);
    new AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter().handle(request, new MockHttpServletResponse(), new MyController());
   // assert something
}

I'd definitely be interested in finding a better option.

  • I see your approach is the most concise and complete. It worked for me like a breeze. – Sym-Sym Mar 27 '13 at 15:41
1

I'm not sure my original answer is going to help with @PathVariable. I've just tried testing an @PathVariable and I get the following exception:

org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.support.HandlerMethodInvocationException: Failed to invoke handler method [public org.springframework.web.servlet.ModelAndView test.MyClass.myMethod(test.SomeType)]; nested exception is java.lang.IllegalStateException: Could not find @PathVariable [parameterName] in @RequestMapping

The reason is that the path variables in the request get parsed by an interceptor. The following approach works for me:

import static org.springframework.test.web.ModelAndViewAssert.*;

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration({"file:web/WEB-INF/application-context.xml",
        "file:web/WEB-INF/dispatcher-servlet.xml"})    
public class MyControllerIntegrationTest {

    @Inject
    private ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    private MockHttpServletRequest request;
    private MockHttpServletResponse response;
    private HandlerAdapter handlerAdapter;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception {
        this.request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
        this.response = new MockHttpServletResponse();

        this.handlerAdapter = applicationContext.getBean(HandlerAdapter.class);
    }

    ModelAndView handle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
            throws Exception {
        final HandlerMapping handlerMapping = applicationContext.getBean(HandlerMapping.class);
        final HandlerExecutionChain handler = handlerMapping.getHandler(request);
        assertNotNull("No handler found for request, check you request mapping", handler);

        final Object controller = handler.getHandler();
        // if you want to override any injected attributes do it here

        final HandlerInterceptor[] interceptors =
            handlerMapping.getHandler(request).getInterceptors();
        for (HandlerInterceptor interceptor : interceptors) {
            final boolean carryOn = interceptor.preHandle(request, response, controller);
            if (!carryOn) {
                return null;
            }
        }

        final ModelAndView mav = handlerAdapter.handle(request, response, controller);
        return mav;
    }

    @Test
    public void testDoSomething() throws Exception {
        request.setRequestURI("/test.html");
        request.setMethod("GET");
        final ModelAndView mav = handle(request, response);
        assertViewName(mav, "view");
        // assert something else
    }

I've add a new blog post on integration testing spring mvc annotations

  • Good answer. I tried this approach, but I'm always getting null for applicationContext. – fastcodejava Jul 28 '11 at 5:32

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