374

I am looking for a way to convert a long string (from a dump), that represents hex values into a byte array.

I couldn't have phrased it better than the person that posted the same question here.

But to keep it original, I'll phrase it my own way: suppose I have a string "00A0BF" that I would like interpreted as the

byte[] {0x00,0xA0,0xBf}

what should I do?

I am a Java novice and ended up using BigInteger and watching out for leading hex zeros. But I think it is ugly and I am sure I am missing something simple.

  • See also stackoverflow.com/questions/9655181/…. – flow2k Oct 23 '18 at 18:54
  • I have tamed BigInteger here. – John McClane Nov 25 '18 at 1:34
  • FWIW String.getBytes() won't work like you think it might. Had to learn this the hard way. if ("FF".getBytes() != "ff".getBytes()) { System.out.println("Try again"); } – tir38 Sep 11 '19 at 17:05

25 Answers 25

639
0

Here's a solution that I think is better than any posted so far:

public static byte[] hexStringToByteArray(String s) {
    int len = s.length();
    byte[] data = new byte[len / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) {
        data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit(s.charAt(i), 16) << 4)
                             + Character.digit(s.charAt(i+1), 16));
    }
    return data;
}

Reasons why it is an improvement:

  • Safe with leading zeros (unlike BigInteger) and with negative byte values (unlike Byte.parseByte)

  • Doesn't convert the String into a char[], or create StringBuilder and String objects for every single byte.

  • No library dependencies that may not be available

Feel free to add argument checking via assert or exceptions if the argument is not known to be safe.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Can you give an example that is decoded incorrectly, or explain how it's wrong? – Dave L. Apr 17 '11 at 14:35
  • 5
    It doesn't work for the String "0". It throws an java.lang.StringIndexOutOfBoundsException – ovdsrn Jun 8 '11 at 20:06
  • 49
    "0" is not valid input. Bytes require two hexidecimal digits each. As the answer notes, "Feel free to add argument checking...if the argument is not known to be safe." – Dave L. Jun 9 '11 at 16:42
  • 12
    javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString) seems to be about 20% faster than the above solution in my micro tests (for whatever little they are worth), as well as correctly throwing exceptions on invalid input (e.g. "gg" is not a valid hexString but will return -77 using the solution as proposed). – Trevor Freeman Apr 4 '12 at 18:31
  • 6
    @DaedalusAlpha It depends on your context, but usually I find it's better to fail fast and loud with such things so that you can fix your assumptions rather than silently returning incorrect data. – Dave L. Jun 17 '15 at 16:03
332
0

One-liners:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;

public static String toHexString(byte[] array) {
    return DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(array);
}

public static byte[] toByteArray(String s) {
    return DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(s);
}

Warnings:

  • in Java 9 Jigsaw this is no longer part of the (default) java.se root set so it will result in a ClassNotFoundException unless you specify --add-modules java.se.ee (thanks to @eckes)
  • Not available on Android (thanks to Fabian for noting that), but you can just take the source code if your system lacks javax.xml for some reason. Thanks to @Bert Regelink for extracting the source.
| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    IMHO this should be the accepted/top answer since it's short and cleanish (unlike @DaveL's answer) and doesn't require any external libs (like skaffman's answer). Also, <Enter a worn joke about reinventing the bicycle>. – Priidu Neemre Aug 18 '15 at 12:40
  • 9
    the datatypeconverter class is not available in android for example. – Fabian Feb 10 '16 at 12:41
  • 4
    Warning: in Java 9 Jigsaw this is no longer part of the (default) java.se root set so it will result in a ClassNotFoundException unless you specify --add-modules java.se.ee – eckes Nov 10 '16 at 12:17
  • 2
    @dantebarba I think javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter already provides a method for encoding/decoding Base64 data. See parseBase64Binary() and printBase64Binary(). – DragShot Jul 3 '17 at 22:18
  • 2
    To add to the issues with DataTypeConverter, Java SE 11 has removed the JAXB API entirely and is now only included with Java EE. You can also add it as a Maven dependency, as suggested here: stackoverflow.com/a/43574427/7347751 – David Mordigal Jan 30 '19 at 5:51
79
0

The Hex class in commons-codec should do that for you.

http://commons.apache.org/codec/

import org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Hex;
...
byte[] decoded = Hex.decodeHex("00A0BF");
// 0x00 0xA0 0xBF
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    This also looks good. See org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Hex.decodeHex() – Dave L. Sep 26 '08 at 17:46
  • It was interesting. But I found their solution hard to follow. Does it have any advantages over what you proposed (other than checking for even number of chars)? – rafraf Sep 27 '08 at 1:06
38
0

You can now use BaseEncoding in guava to accomplish this.

BaseEncoding.base16().decode(string);

To reverse it use

BaseEncoding.base16().encode(bytes);
| improve this answer | |
27
0

Actually, I think the BigInteger is solution is very nice:

new BigInteger("00A0BF", 16).toByteArray();

Edit: Not safe for leading zeros, as noted by the poster.

| improve this answer | |
  • I also thought so initially. And thank you for documenting it - I was just thinking I should... it did some strange things though that I didn't really understand - like omit some leading 0x00 and also mix up the order of 1 byte in a 156 byte string I was playing with. – rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 16:43
  • 2
    That's a good point about leading 0's. I'm not sure I believe it could mix up the order of bytes, and would be very interested to see it demonstrated. – Dave L. Sep 26 '08 at 16:55
  • 1
    yeah, as soon as I said it, I didn't believe me either :) I ran a compare of the byte array from BigInteger with mmyers'fromHexString and (with no 0x00) against the offending string - they were identical. The "mix up" did happen, but it may have been something else. I willlook more closely tomorrow – rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 17:09
  • 3
    The issue with BigInteger is that there must be a "sign bit". If the leading byte has the high bit set then the resulting byte array has an extra 0 in the 1st position. But still +1. – Gray Oct 28 '11 at 16:20
25
0

One-liners:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;

public static String toHexString(byte[] array) {
    return DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(array);
}

public static byte[] toByteArray(String s) {
    return DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(s);
}

For those of you interested in the actual code behind the One-liners from FractalizeR (I needed that since javax.xml.bind is not available for Android (by default)), this comes from com.sun.xml.internal.bind.DatatypeConverterImpl.java :

public byte[] parseHexBinary(String s) {
    final int len = s.length();

    // "111" is not a valid hex encoding.
    if( len%2 != 0 )
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("hexBinary needs to be even-length: "+s);

    byte[] out = new byte[len/2];

    for( int i=0; i<len; i+=2 ) {
        int h = hexToBin(s.charAt(i  ));
        int l = hexToBin(s.charAt(i+1));
        if( h==-1 || l==-1 )
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("contains illegal character for hexBinary: "+s);

        out[i/2] = (byte)(h*16+l);
    }

    return out;
}

private static int hexToBin( char ch ) {
    if( '0'<=ch && ch<='9' )    return ch-'0';
    if( 'A'<=ch && ch<='F' )    return ch-'A'+10;
    if( 'a'<=ch && ch<='f' )    return ch-'a'+10;
    return -1;
}

private static final char[] hexCode = "0123456789ABCDEF".toCharArray();

public String printHexBinary(byte[] data) {
    StringBuilder r = new StringBuilder(data.length*2);
    for ( byte b : data) {
        r.append(hexCode[(b >> 4) & 0xF]);
        r.append(hexCode[(b & 0xF)]);
    }
    return r.toString();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    DatatypeConverter is also not available in Java 9 by default. The dangerous thing is code using it will compile under Java 1.8 or earlier (Java 9 with source settings to earlier), but get a runtime exception under Java 9 without "--add-modules java.se.ee". – Stephen M -on strike- Aug 28 '17 at 16:54
24
0

The HexBinaryAdapter provides the ability to marshal and unmarshal between String and byte[].

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.HexBinaryAdapter;

public byte[] hexToBytes(String hexString) {
     HexBinaryAdapter adapter = new HexBinaryAdapter();
     byte[] bytes = adapter.unmarshal(hexString);
     return bytes;
}

That's just an example I typed in...I actually just use it as is and don't need to make a separate method for using it.

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    It works only if the input string (hexString) has an even number of characters. Otherwise: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: hexBinary needs to be even-length: – ovdsrn Jun 8 '11 at 20:15
  • 3
    Oh, thanks for pointing that out. A user really shouldn't have an odd number of characters because the byte array is represented as {0x00,0xA0,0xBf}. Each byte has two hex digits or nibbles. So any number of bytes should always have an even number of characters. Thanks for mentioning this. – GrkEngineer Jun 16 '11 at 15:54
  • 8
    You can use java.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString) directly instead of using HexBinaryAdapter (which in turn calls DatatypeConverter). This way you do not have to create an adapter instance object (since DatatypeConverter methods are static). – Trevor Freeman Apr 4 '12 at 18:33
  • javax.xml.bind.* is no longer available in Java 9. The dangerous thing is code using it will compile under Java 1.8 or earlier (Java 9 with source settings to earlier), but get a runtime exception running under Java 9. – Stephen M -on strike- Aug 28 '17 at 16:52
15
0

Here is a method that actually works (based on several previous semi-correct answers):

private static byte[] fromHexString(final String encoded) {
    if ((encoded.length() % 2) != 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input string must contain an even number of characters");

    final byte result[] = new byte[encoded.length()/2];
    final char enc[] = encoded.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < enc.length; i += 2) {
        StringBuilder curr = new StringBuilder(2);
        curr.append(enc[i]).append(enc[i + 1]);
        result[i/2] = (byte) Integer.parseInt(curr.toString(), 16);
    }
    return result;
}

The only possible issue that I can see is if the input string is extremely long; calling toCharArray() makes a copy of the string's internal array.

EDIT: Oh, and by the way, bytes are signed in Java, so your input string converts to [0, -96, -65] instead of [0, 160, 191]. But you probably knew that already.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks Michael - you're a life saver! Working on a BlackBerry project and trying to convert a string representation of a byte back into the byte ... using RIM's "Byte.parseByte( byteString, 16 )" method. Kept throwing a NumberFormatExcpetion. Spent hours tyring to figure out why. Your suggestion of "Integer.praseInt()" did the trick. Thanks again!! – BonanzaDriver Oct 23 '11 at 19:28
12
0

In android ,if you are working with hex, you can try okio.

simple usage:

byte[] bytes = ByteString.decodeHex("c000060000").toByteArray();

and result will be

[-64, 0, 6, 0, 0]
| improve this answer | |
  • I have tested many different methods but this one is at least twice as fast! – poby May 5 at 6:07
5
0

The BigInteger() Method from java.math is very Slow and not recommandable.

Integer.parseInt(HEXString, 16)

can cause problems with some characters without converting to Digit / Integer

a Well Working method:

Integer.decode("0xXX") .byteValue()

Function:

public static byte[] HexStringToByteArray(String s) {
    byte data[] = new byte[s.length()/2];
    for(int i=0;i < s.length();i+=2) {
        data[i/2] = (Integer.decode("0x"+s.charAt(i)+s.charAt(i+1))).byteValue();
    }
    return data;
}

Have Fun, Good Luck

| improve this answer | |
4
0

EDIT: as pointed out by @mmyers, this method doesn't work on input that contains substrings corresponding to bytes with the high bit set ("80" - "FF"). The explanation is at Bug ID: 6259307 Byte.parseByte not working as advertised in the SDK Documentation.

public static final byte[] fromHexString(final String s) {
    byte[] arr = new byte[s.length()/2];
    for ( int start = 0; start < s.length(); start += 2 )
    {
        String thisByte = s.substring(start, start+2);
        arr[start/2] = Byte.parseByte(thisByte, 16);
    }
    return arr;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Close, but this method fails on the given input "00A0BBF". See bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6259307. – Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:34
  • 1
    Also strangely it does not deal with "9C" – rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 15:58
  • 1
    @mmyers: whoa. That's not good. Sorry for th confusion. @ravigad: 9C has the same problem because in this case the high bit is set. – Blair Conrad Sep 26 '08 at 16:37
  • (byte)Short.parseShort(thisByte, 16) solves that problem – Jamey Hicks Jul 28 '17 at 13:10
3
0

For what it's worth, here's another version which supports odd length strings, without resorting to string concatenation.

public static byte[] hexStringToByteArray(String input) {
    int len = input.length();

    if (len == 0) {
        return new byte[] {};
    }

    byte[] data;
    int startIdx;
    if (len % 2 != 0) {
        data = new byte[(len / 2) + 1];
        data[0] = (byte) Character.digit(input.charAt(0), 16);
        startIdx = 1;
    } else {
        data = new byte[len / 2];
        startIdx = 0;
    }

    for (int i = startIdx; i < len; i += 2) {
        data[(i + 1) / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit(input.charAt(i), 16) << 4)
                + Character.digit(input.charAt(i+1), 16));
    }
    return data;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

I've always used a method like

public static final byte[] fromHexString(final String s) {
    String[] v = s.split(" ");
    byte[] arr = new byte[v.length];
    int i = 0;
    for(String val: v) {
        arr[i++] =  Integer.decode("0x" + val).byteValue();

    }
    return arr;
}

this method splits on space delimited hex values but it wouldn't be hard to make it split the string on any other criteria such as into groupings of two characters.

| improve this answer | |
  • The string concatenation is unnecessary. Just use Integer.valueOf(val, 16). – Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:21
  • I've tried using the radix conversions like that before and I've had mixed results – pfranza Sep 26 '08 at 15:23
  • thanks - oddly it works fine with this string: "9C001C" or "001C21" and fails with this one: "9C001C21" Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "9C001C21" at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(Unknown Source) – rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 16:07
  • (That's not more odd than in the Byte/byte case: highest bit set without leading -) – greybeard Feb 13 '16 at 18:17
2
0

I like the Character.digit solution, but here is how I solved it

public byte[] hex2ByteArray( String hexString ) {
    String hexVal = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    byte[] out = new byte[hexString.length() / 2];

    int n = hexString.length();

    for( int i = 0; i < n; i += 2 ) {
        //make a bit representation in an int of the hex value 
        int hn = hexVal.indexOf( hexString.charAt( i ) );
        int ln = hexVal.indexOf( hexString.charAt( i + 1 ) );

        //now just shift the high order nibble and add them together
        out[i/2] = (byte)( ( hn << 4 ) | ln );
    }

    return out;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

The Code presented by Bert Regelink simply does not work. Try the following:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;
import java.io.*;

public class Test
{  
    @Test
    public void testObjectStreams( ) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException
    {     
            ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);

            String stringTest = "TEST";
            oos.writeObject( stringTest );

            oos.close();
            baos.close();

            byte[] bytes = baos.toByteArray();
            String hexString = DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary( bytes);
            byte[] reconvertedBytes = DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString);

            assertArrayEquals( bytes, reconvertedBytes );

            ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(reconvertedBytes);
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(bais);

            String readString = (String) ois.readObject();

            assertEquals( stringTest, readString);
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This is a different problem really, and probably belongs on another thread. – Sean Coffey Nov 8 '12 at 19:48
1
0

I found Kernel Panic to have the solution most useful to me, but ran into problems if the hex string was an odd number. solved it this way:

boolean isOdd(int value)
{
    return (value & 0x01) !=0;
}

private int hexToByte(byte[] out, int value)
{
    String hexVal = "0123456789ABCDEF"; 
    String hexValL = "0123456789abcdef";
    String st = Integer.toHexString(value);
    int len = st.length();
    if (isOdd(len))
        {
        len+=1; // need length to be an even number.
        st = ("0" + st);  // make it an even number of chars
        }
    out[0]=(byte)(len/2);
    for (int i =0;i<len;i+=2)
    {
        int hh = hexVal.indexOf(st.charAt(i));
            if (hh == -1)  hh = hexValL.indexOf(st.charAt(i));
        int lh = hexVal.indexOf(st.charAt(i+1));
            if (lh == -1)  lh = hexValL.indexOf(st.charAt(i+1));
        out[(i/2)+1] = (byte)((hh << 4)|lh);
    }
    return (len/2)+1;
}

I am adding a number of hex numbers to an array, so i pass the reference to the array I am using, and the int I need converted and returning the relative position of the next hex number. So the final byte array has [0] number of hex pairs, [1...] hex pairs, then the number of pairs...

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Based on the op voted solution, the following should be a bit more efficient:

  public static byte [] hexStringToByteArray (final String s) {
    if (s == null || (s.length () % 2) == 1)
      throw new IllegalArgumentException ();
    final char [] chars = s.toCharArray ();
    final int len = chars.length;
    final byte [] data = new byte [len / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) {
      data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit (chars[i], 16) << 4) + Character.digit (chars[i + 1], 16));
    }
    return data;
  }

Because: the initial conversion to a char array spares the length checks in charAt

| improve this answer | |
1
0

If you have a preference for Java 8 streams as your coding style then this can be achieved using just JDK primitives.

String hex = "0001027f80fdfeff";

byte[] converted = IntStream.range(0, hex.length() / 2)
    .map(i -> Character.digit(hex.charAt(i * 2), 16) << 4 | Character.digit(hex.charAt((i * 2) + 1), 16))
    .collect(ByteArrayOutputStream::new,
             ByteArrayOutputStream::write,
             (s1, s2) -> s1.write(s2.toByteArray(), 0, s2.size()))
    .toByteArray();

The , 0, s2.size() parameters in the collector concatenate function can be omitted if you don't mind catching IOException.

| improve this answer | |
0
0
public static byte[] hex2ba(String sHex) throws Hex2baException {
    if (1==sHex.length()%2) {
        throw(new Hex2baException("Hex string need even number of chars"));
    }

    byte[] ba = new byte[sHex.length()/2];
    for (int i=0;i<sHex.length()/2;i++) {
        ba[i] = (Integer.decode(
                "0x"+sHex.substring(i*2, (i+1)*2))).byteValue();
    }
    return ba;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

My formal solution:

/**
 * Decodes a hexadecimally encoded binary string.
 * <p>
 * Note that this function does <em>NOT</em> convert a hexadecimal number to a
 * binary number.
 *
 * @param hex Hexadecimal representation of data.
 * @return The byte[] representation of the given data.
 * @throws NumberFormatException If the hexadecimal input string is of odd
 * length or invalid hexadecimal string.
 */
public static byte[] hex2bin(String hex) throws NumberFormatException {
    if (hex.length() % 2 > 0) {
        throw new NumberFormatException("Hexadecimal input string must have an even length.");
    }
    byte[] r = new byte[hex.length() / 2];
    for (int i = hex.length(); i > 0;) {
        r[i / 2 - 1] = (byte) (digit(hex.charAt(--i)) | (digit(hex.charAt(--i)) << 4));
    }
    return r;
}

private static int digit(char ch) {
    int r = Character.digit(ch, 16);
    if (r < 0) {
        throw new NumberFormatException("Invalid hexadecimal string: " + ch);
    }
    return r;
}

Is like the PHP hex2bin() Function but in Java style.

Example:

String data = new String(hex2bin("6578616d706c65206865782064617461"));
// data value: "example hex data"
| improve this answer | |
0
0

Late to the party, but I have amalgamated the answer above by DaveL into a class with the reverse action - just in case it helps.

public final class HexString {
    private static final char[] digits = "0123456789ABCDEF".toCharArray();

    private HexString() {}

    public static final String fromBytes(final byte[] bytes) {
        final StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.length; i++) {
            buf.append(HexString.digits[(bytes[i] >> 4) & 0x0f]);
            buf.append(HexString.digits[bytes[i] & 0x0f]);
        }
        return buf.toString();
    }

    public static final byte[] toByteArray(final String hexString) {
        if ((hexString.length() % 2) != 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input string must contain an even number of characters");
        }
        final int len = hexString.length();
        final byte[] data = new byte[len / 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) {
            data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit(hexString.charAt(i), 16) << 4)
                    + Character.digit(hexString.charAt(i + 1), 16));
        }
        return data;
    }
}

And JUnit test class:

public class TestHexString {

    @Test
    public void test() {
        String[] tests = {"0FA1056D73", "", "00", "0123456789ABCDEF", "FFFFFFFF"};

        for (int i = 0; i < tests.length; i++) {
            String in = tests[i];
            byte[] bytes = HexString.toByteArray(in);
            String out = HexString.fromBytes(bytes);
            System.out.println(in); //DEBUG
            System.out.println(out); //DEBUG
            Assert.assertEquals(in, out);

        }

    }

}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

I know this is a very old thread, but still like to add my penny worth.

If I really need to code up a simple hex string to binary converter, I'd like to do it as follows.

public static byte[] hexToBinary(String s){

  /*
   * skipped any input validation code
   */

  byte[] data = new byte[s.length()/2];

  for( int i=0, j=0; 
       i<s.length() && j<data.length; 
       i+=2, j++)
  {
     data[j] = (byte)Integer.parseInt(s.substring(i, i+2), 16);
  }

  return data;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

By far not the cleanest solution. But it works for me and is well formatted:

private String createHexDump(byte[] msg, String description) {
    System.out.println();
    String result = "\n" + description;
    int currentIndex = 0;
    int printedIndex = 0;
    for(int i=0 ; i<msg.length ; i++){
        currentIndex++;
        if(i == 0){
            result += String.format("\n  %04x ", i);
        }
        if(i % 16 == 0 && i != 0){
            result += " | ";
            for(int j=(i-16) ; j<msg.length && j<i ; j++) {
                char characterToAdd = (char) msg[j];
                if (characterToAdd == '\n') {
                    characterToAdd = ' ';
                }
                result += characterToAdd;
                printedIndex++;
            }

            result += String.format("\n  %04x ", i);
        }

        result += String.format("%02x ", msg[i]);
    }

    if(currentIndex - printedIndex > 0){
        int leftOvers = currentIndex - printedIndex;
        for(int i=0 ; i<16-leftOvers ; i++){
            result += "   ";
        }

        result += " | ";

        for(int i=msg.length-leftOvers ; i<msg.length ; i++){
            char characterToAdd = (char) msg[i];
            if (characterToAdd == '\n') {
                characterToAdd = ' ';
            }
            result += characterToAdd;
        }
    }

    result += "\n";

    return result;
}

The output:

  S -> C
    0000 0b 00 2e 06 4d 6f 72 69 74 7a 53 6f 6d 65 20 54  |  .Heyyy Some T
    0010 43 50 20 73 74 75 66 66 20 49 20 63 61 70 74 75  | CP stuff I captu
    0020 72 65 64 2e 2e 77 65 6c 6c 20 66 6f 72 6d 61 74  | red..well format
    0030 3f                                               | ?
| improve this answer | |
-2
0

I think will do it for you. I cobbled it together from a similar function that returned the data as a string:

private static byte[] decode(String encoded) {
    byte result[] = new byte[encoded/2];
    char enc[] = encoded.toUpperCase().toCharArray();
    StringBuffer curr;
    for (int i = 0; i < enc.length; i += 2) {
        curr = new StringBuffer("");
        curr.append(String.valueOf(enc[i]));
        curr.append(String.valueOf(enc[i + 1]));
        result[i] = (byte) Integer.parseInt(curr.toString(), 16);
    }
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • First, you shouldn't need to convert the string to uppercase. Second, it is possible to append chars directly to a StringBuffer, which should be much more efficient. – Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:48
-2
0

For Me this was the solution, HEX="FF01" then split to FF(255) and 01(01)

private static byte[] BytesEncode(String encoded) {
    //System.out.println(encoded.length());
    byte result[] = new byte[encoded.length() / 2];
    char enc[] = encoded.toUpperCase().toCharArray();
    String curr = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < encoded.length(); i=i+2) {
        curr = encoded.substring(i,i+2);
        System.out.println(curr);
        if(i==0){
            result[i]=((byte) Integer.parseInt(curr, 16));
        }else{
            result[i/2]=((byte) Integer.parseInt(curr, 16));
        }

    }
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This question has been answered for a while and has several good alternatives in place; unfortunately, your answer does not provide any significantly improved value at this point. – rfornal Dec 6 '14 at 1:10

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