2

I may be approaching this all wrong, so tell me if you have an alternative suggestions.

I'm making an app for windows RT that will have a bunch of text blocks displayed to the user, for example character stats. The user will see:

Str: 10
Con: 10
Dex: 10

and so on.

I want them to be able to fill these in, then have a select view values calculated based on the result.

My though was to click an "Edit" button at the top and toggle some text boxes over each editable text block.

When trying to set this up using "Blend for Visual Studio" I can't seem to make a text box that is smaller than 49x34 (much larger than my text blocks).

I was going to find a way to generate a text box for each text block (using its dimensions) on button click, but since they will always be the same and there will be a lot of them I was trying to make them static via blend.

I'm pretty new to XAML, and I can't seem to find a good example of people setting up editable fields like this, so how should I make a bunch of static fields have editable text boxes?

5 Answers 5

7

I would create both the TextBox and TextBlock overlays in XAML, and place them directly on top of each other in a Grid, using Horizontal and Vertical alignments to "Center" to ensure that the text is always completely lined up. I would also use static Widths to ensure that the columns line up well.

From there, you can directly bind the Visibility to some boolean "IsEditing" property, to make sure that only one of the controls are shown at a time.

<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
    <TextBlock Text="Str: " Width="40" VerticalAlignment="Center" />
    <Grid Width="40" VerticalAlignment="Center">
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Strength}" 
            Visibility="{Binding IsEditing, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToInvisibilityConverter}}"
            VerticalAlignment="Center" 
            HorizontalAlignment="Center" />
        <TextBox Text="{Binding Strength}" 
            Visibility="{Binding IsEditing, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}"
            VerticalAlignment="Center" 
            HorizontalContentAlignment="Center" />
    </Grid>
</StackPanel>

Somewhere along the way you'll have to define your "BooleanToVisibility" and "BooleanToInvisiblity" converter resources. I like this implementation by Diedrik Krols. It's nice and simple, with the option to invert.

10
  • This looks like exactly what I need. I just need to set it up. Thanks!
    – Sambardo
    Dec 29, 2012 at 14:28
  • Scratch that, I just set it up in my project and I get "BooleanToVisibilityConverter is not supported in a windows app project" syntax error in the App.xaml when I try to add something like "<mvvm:BooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="TrueToVisibleConverter" />" Why is this XAML so different? It seems like there should be an easy way to do this.
    – Sambardo
    Dec 29, 2012 at 15:50
  • I mention that at the end of the answer: you must implement an IValueConverter. Follow the link for an example implementation.
    – BTownTKD
    Dec 29, 2012 at 15:53
  • I implemented that first bit (that he has in the mvvm namespace, but I put it in my own namespace). Thanks for pointing this out though because it made me go back and look and realize I forgot to put in the bit that tells my XAML the namespace exists! Back to hacking away at it :)
    – Sambardo
    Dec 29, 2012 at 16:32
  • I'm not sure the etiquette on here so let me know if this response shouldn't be a comment. After adding 'xmlns:Pathfinder="using:MyNameSpace"' into my App.xaml file I still get the error. Hacking around a bit I think I'm misunderstanding how to add it to the App.xaml file. I get different errors moving it in an out of the (already declared) '<ResourceDictionary>' tag. No matter where I put it I always get the error "BooleanToVisibilityConverter does not exist in namespace 'using:MyNameSpace'" I think I may just be fundamentally misunderstanding something here.
    – Sambardo
    Dec 29, 2012 at 16:53
5

You might want to use a style for a TextBox, which changes depending on whether or not the "IsReadOnly" property is true or not.

When IsReadOnly is true, you can set the BorderBrush and Background to Transparent, thus making it look like a normal textblock.

In this way, you don't have to overlay TextBlocks and TextBoxes; just use TextBox controls by themselves, and toggle the "IsReadOnly" property when you click the Edit button.

In your resources:

<Style x:Key="MyEditableField" TargetType={x:Type TextBox}>
    <Style.Triggers>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding IsReadOnly, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}" Value="True">
            <Setter Property="BorderBrush" Value="Transparent" />
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="Transparent" />
        </DataTrigger>
    </Style.Triggers>
</Style>

And here's one of your editable fields:

<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
    <TextBlock Text="Str: " />
    <TextBox Style="{StaticResource MyEditableField}"
             Text="{Binding Strength}"
             IsReadOnly="{Binding IsEditingDisabled}" />
</StackPanel>
6
  • So, if I'm understanding this right, the data trigger means if I set it to read only, the BorderBrush and Background will trigger and turn off?
    – Sambardo
    Dec 24, 2012 at 6:27
  • I seem to be getting errors on TargetType={x:Type TextBox} where it doesn't like it as a valid name. <Style.Triggers> and Datatrigger seem to throw errors too. Am I fundamentally misunderstanding how this works, or is there some library I need to include? (searching around online didn't show much this morning)
    – Sambardo
    Dec 24, 2012 at 16:18
  • Oh my, on further investigation, Style.Triggers is no longer supported in Windows 8 XAML. Looks like you're supposed to use the VisualStateManager now, instead. This answer requires a bit more research, because using a combination of VisualStateManager + Attahced behaviors for manual transitions sounds a bit overkill for your needs. I may post a whole new answer to help with your previous approach.
    – BTownTKD
    Dec 24, 2012 at 17:04
  • Thanks! I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out why my winRT project didn't like it. The tutorials and documentation seem a lot more lacking than XNA was so I'm having a tough time (as a tutorial learner). I'll be playing around with your new answer soon :)
    – Sambardo
    Dec 24, 2012 at 19:25
  • Was the second answer helpful?
    – BTownTKD
    Dec 29, 2012 at 3:40
4

Late answer, but who wants can also create a custom editable textbox, its pretty easy actually here is the code (obviously you can modify it for your own needs)

 public class EditableTextBox : TextBox
{
    public EditableTextBox()
    {
        this.BorderBrush = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Black);
    }
    protected override void OnTapped(TappedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.IsReadOnly = false;
        SetEditingStyle();
        base.OnTapped(e);
    }

    protected override void OnDoubleTapped(DoubleTappedRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.IsReadOnly = false;
        SetEditingStyle();
        base.OnDoubleTapped(e);
    }

    protected override void OnLostFocus(RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.IsReadOnly = true;
        SetReadonlyStyle();
        base.OnLostFocus(e);
    }

    public void SetReadonlyStyle()
    {
        this.BorderBrush.Opacity = 0;
        this.Background.Opacity = 0;
    }

    public void SetEditingStyle()
    {
        this.BorderBrush.Opacity = 1;
        this.Background.Opacity = 1;
    }
}

Sample:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Tutorial: Full tutorial url

0
1

Using a property to toggle edit mode between view AND viewmodel is a bad design approach you should use events and command binding to communicate changes of states like this between view and viewmodel.

Here is an article that describes the principle in an MVVM compliant way: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/802385/A-WPF-MVVM-In-Place-Edit-TextBox-Control

Please have a look and tell me what you think.

0

This builds off of BTownTKD's solution, but as I really do prefer as much WPF of a solution as possible here is a bit of a modification, in my case I'm trying to modify the name of a tab control.

My view model has the following code:

    private bool _isEditingName = false;

    public bool IsEditingName
    {
        get
        {
            return _isEditingName;
        }
        set
        {
            _isEditingName = value;
            OnPropertyChanged();
        }
    }

    public ICommand StartEditing
    {
        get
        {
            return new DelegateCommand(() =>
            {
                IsEditingName = true;
            });
        }
    }

    public ICommand EndEditing
    {
        get
        {
            return new DelegateCommand(() =>
            {
                IsEditingName = false;
            });
        }
    }

Next is my view that has the data template for the tab (not the content just the tab):

<TabControl ItemsSource="{Binding Items}" SelectedItem="{Binding ActiveItem}">
    <TabControl.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <Grid VerticalAlignment="Center">
                <TextBlock x:Name="TabName" Text="{Binding Name}" Visibility="{Binding IsEditingName, Converter={StaticResource InvertedBoolToVisConverter}}" VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" TextAlignment="Left">
                    <TextBlock.InputBindings>
                        <MouseBinding MouseAction="LeftDoubleClick" Command="{Binding StartEditing}" />
                    </TextBlock.InputBindings>
                </TextBlock>
                <TextBox Text="{Binding Name}" Visibility="{Binding IsEditingName, Converter={StaticResource BoolToVisConverter}}" VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch" TextAlignment="Left" IsVisibleChanged="TextBox_IsVisibleChanged">
                    <i:Interaction.Triggers>
                        <i:EventTrigger EventName="LostFocus">
                            <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding EndEditing}" />
                        </i:EventTrigger>
                    </i:Interaction.Triggers>
                    <TextBox.InputBindings>
                        <KeyBinding  Key="Enter" Command="{Binding EndEditing}" />
                    </TextBox.InputBindings>
                </TextBox>
            </Grid>                 
        </DataTemplate>
    </TabControl.ItemTemplate>  
</TabControl>

And last but not least, I wanted a double click to put me in edit mode, and to auto focus on the textbox and select all of the content for immediate typing. None of the xaml solutions were as clean as a simple code behind so I finally just decided on adding this to the textbox on visibility changed handler:

    private void TextBox_IsVisibleChanged(object sender, System.Windows.DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var box = sender as TextBox;
        if (box != null)
        {
            if ((bool)e.NewValue)
            {
                box.Focus();
                box.SelectAll();
            }
        }
    }

Out of all of the solutions I found, this was by far my favorite. Thanks everyone for your posts!! Helped me find a really good overall solution to my problem!

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