My first post here, but I googled around and cannot find a simple way to do this.

I have a program which automatically configures new CentOS Linux servers as they come online. As part of the process it installs the latest version of epel-release rpm.

The command I use looks like this:

$ rpm -Uvh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-7.noarch.rpm && \
     yum clean all

This works great... until they change the rpm file to epel-release-6-8.noarch, then epel-release-6-9.noarch, and so on. They seem to update the version every 3-4 months. This is a problem, because if the repository updates the epel-release version number, my scripts will fail because it has no idea what that version should be.

I failed to find a link that might redirect to the latest epel rpm file, so I have no choice but to hard-code the version into my install scripts, and change it when they fail.

Anyone know a simple (non-hard-coded) way to download the latest epel rpm without knowing the version number? I'm hoping for a way that does not involve dong a curl on the repo file list and grep'ing the url, but curious what anyone might suggest?

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The following script will do the trick:

cat <<EOM >/etc/yum.repos.d/epel-bootstrap.repo
[epel]
name=Bootstrap EPEL
mirrorlist=http://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/mirrorlist?repo=epel-\$releasever&arch=\$basearch
failovermethod=priority
enabled=0
gpgcheck=0
EOM

yum --enablerepo=epel -y install epel-release
rm -f /etc/yum.repos.d/epel-bootstrap.repo

It should work on RHEL/CentOS 5 and 6. I didn't test version 4.

  • Thank you ravello! – Crash Override Jan 6 '13 at 9:17
  • Really, really cool - thank you! – paulsm4 Sep 13 '13 at 19:27
  • 2
    This is a great idea! I adapted it for an Ansible playbook to break dependencies on a few hard-coded repo RPM URLs: github.com/zigg/octothorpe/commit/… – zigg Nov 13 '13 at 19:06
  • Confirmed this also works with CentOS 7. – a1wca Jul 9 '14 at 17:02
  • 6
    NOTE for CentOS users You can install EPEL by running yum install epel-release. The package is included in the CentOS Extras repository, enabled by default. Source: fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL – a1wca Oct 25 '14 at 10:39

Do it right from the shell:

$ EPEL_BASEURL=http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/$(awk '/rhel/ {print $2}' /etc/rpm/macros.dist)/$(uname -p)/
$ rpm -ivh $EPEL_BASEURL$(curl -s $EPEL_BASEURL | grep epel-release | awk -F'<|>' '{print $5}')
Retrieving http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
warning: /var/tmp/rpm-tmp.zRXE1U: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID 0608b895: NOKEY
Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]
   1:epel-release           ########################################### [100%]

I've tested this on CentOS 6.4, 6.5 and 6.6 and RHEL 6.5 and 6.6, but the contents of /etc/rpm/macros.dist and the HTML code from http://dl.fedoraproject.org should be consistent on all platforms, so this should work on all platforms.

For posterity's sake, here it is with more detail:

$ EPEL_BASEURL=http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/$(awk '/rhel/ {print $2}' /etc/rpm/macros.dist)/$(uname -p)/
# http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/
$ EPEL_RELEASE_RPM=$(curl -s $EPEL_BASEURL | grep epel-release | awk -F'<|>' '{print $5}')
# epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
$ EPEL_RELEASE_RPMURL=$EPEL_BASEURL$EPEL_RELEASE_RPM
# http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
$ rpm -ivh $EPEL_RELEASE_RPMURL
Retrieving http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
warning: /var/tmp/rpm-tmp.ep6xy3: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID 0608b895: NOKEY
Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]
   1:epel-release           ########################################### [100%]

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