31

I execute the follow mongodb command in mongo shell

db.coll.aggregate(...)

and i see the list of result. but is it possible to see the query execution time? Is there any equivalent function for explain method for aggregation queries.

2

6 Answers 6

37
var before = new Date()
#aggregation query
var after = new Date()
execution_mills = after - before
2
  • 2
    This is the most accurate way atm unfortunately however it is not as accurate as what the OP is asking for due to measuring the applications runtime not the databases.
    – Sammaye
    Commented Dec 24, 2012 at 14:08
  • 20
    d = new Date; db.coll.aggregate(...); print(new Date - d + 'ms'), succinctly.
    – Josh Unger
    Commented Nov 13, 2013 at 19:55
17

You can add a time function to your .mongorc.js file (in your home directory):

function time(command) {
    const t1 = new Date();
    const result = command();
    const t2 = new Date();
    print("time: " + (t2 - t1) + "ms");
    return result; 
}

and then you can use it like so:

time(() => db.coll.aggregate(...))

Caution

This method doesn't give relevant results for db.collection.find()

7
  • 1
    The timing is displayed, even seconds before the results from the database are returned.
    – Complexity
    Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 7:44
  • 1
    @Complexity are you sure you passed your query as a function (() => ...)? Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 7:59
  • I did. This is the query and the output: mongos> time(() => db["article.[L]"].find({"seo.keywords": "boor"})) time required to execute the function: 0 milliseconds. After this line, it takes 2 seconds to get the results, so why does the timing function come back so fast?
    – Complexity
    Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 8:03
  • I will check it. My solution is basically the same approach as the most upvoted one. The only difference is that I put it in a function and saved in .mongorc.js so it's more convenient to use. Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 8:07
  • Thanks, I'm using this to count performance on a sharded collection. The query is executed from a Mongo Router.
    – Complexity
    Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 8:11
12

i see that in mongodb there is a possibility to use this two command:

  • db.setProfilingLevel(2)

  • and so after the query you can use db.system.profile.find() to see the query execution time and other

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  • 1
    What fields in profile.find() output represent query time? Commented Jun 1, 2014 at 16:10
  • 2
    One line example: db.system.profile.drop(); db.setProfilingLevel(2); db.collection.aggregate([ <pipeline> ]); db.setProfilingLevel(0); db.system.profile.findOne().millis Commented Dec 9, 2014 at 14:02
10

Or you can install the excellent mongo-hacker, which automatically times every query, pretty()fies it, colorizes the output, sorts the keys, and more:

enter image description here

1
  • 4
    Unfortunately this only works for the find() command, not for aggregate().
    – Alexis
    Commented Sep 5, 2014 at 10:37
8

I will write an answer to explain this better.

Basically there is no explain() functionality for the aggregation framework yet: https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-4504

However there is a way to measure client side but not without its downsides:

  • You are not measuring the database
  • You are measuring the application
  • There are too many unknowns about the in between parts to be able to get an accurate reading, i.e. you can't say that it took 0.04ms for the document result to be formulated by the MongoDB server, serialised, sent over the wire, de-serialised by the app and then stored into a hash allowing you subtract that sum from the total to get a aggregation benchmark.

However that being said, you might be able to get a slightly accurate result by doing it in MongoDB console on the same server as the mongos / mongod. This will create very little in betweens, still too many but enough to maybe get a reading you could roughly trust. As such you could use @Zagorulkin's answer in that position.

4
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    I would like to mention that as of 2.6 this answer is out of date, there is an explain() right on the aggregate() command now
    – Sammaye
    Commented Dec 9, 2014 at 21:06
  • 1
    I don't think the new explain: true option in aggregate gives execution time - just query planning info Commented Nov 16, 2016 at 2:22
  • No it measures the explain query again now
    – Sammaye
    Commented Nov 16, 2016 at 7:01
  • The JIRA ticket has been closed already and MongoDB has explain for aggregate().
    – user7114184
    Commented Aug 8, 2021 at 19:20
2

Yes, now you can use an explain() in your aggregations from mongosh. For that you'd just need to add the following to your command -> db.yourCollectionName.explain("executionStats").aggregate(<yourAggregationStages>)

and then you can see the response contains execution stats as well for the aggregation supplied. This is the format you'd see:

executionStats: { executionSuccess: true, executionTimeMillis: '5.833', planningTimeMillis: '0.461', executionStages: { stage: 'SUBSCAN', nReturned: '1', executionTimeMillisEstimate: '5.124', ...

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