11

I created a class with two get methods, one const and one non-const. The const method is public, so users can query the vector. The non-const method is protected, so I can use it to modify the data I need.

When I try to use the class, however, and call the get method, the compiler complains that the non-const method is protected. Instead, I have to use const_cast to cast the object to const, so I can get instead the public method.

Is there a way to solve this? Why wouldn't the compiler do the cast itself, since there is a public method? If I remove the protected version and just leave the const one, it works fine, so it does do the cast in this situation. Casting to const is always safe. It's removing constness that is a problem.

4

The compiler considers accessibility after it decides what member function it wants to call. That is, protected and private functions are still visible, even though they aren't accessible.

Why? One reason is that if you made inaccessible functions ignored by overload resolution, you could change what function is called simply by changing its accessibility. With the current rules, you can only cause compiling code to fail to compile, or cause code that currently doesn't work to compile, or change something with no effect on the meaning of the code. You cannot change access specifiers and silently cause a different function to be called.

As a contrived example, here's a pretty terrible class interface:

public:
    // Returns the amount of change tendered for this transaction.
    MoneyAmount change() const;

private:
    // Account for a change of currency. Charges standard moneychanger's fee.
    MoneyAmount change(Currency toCurrency = Currency::USD);

If inaccessible functions were removed from overload resolution, client code could call change() just fine. And if later the second change(Currency) function was made public and the first one deleted, that code would suddenly silently call another function with an entirely different purpose. The current rules prevent a change of access specifier from changing the behavior of a compiling program.

7

Member access control is the very last thing that occurs when calling a member function. It happens after name lookup, template argument deduction, overload resolution, and so on. The reason why it is done last is because it was decided that changing the access control for a member should not suddenly change the execution of client code.

Imagine access was checked before overload resolution, and you used a library and a certain member function in that library. Then the library authors made the function private. Suddenly, your code starts using a different overload and behaves in a completely different way. The library authors probably intended that anybody using that overload of the function should stop using it, but they didn't intend to change everybody's code. However, as the standard is actually defined, your code would now start giving you an error for using a private member, rather than behave differently.

The solution is to simply change the name of your protected member function so that it isn't considered.

0

In C++, method selection (overloading resolution) happens before considering public/private access control.

0

Use a protected setter method instead (or data member) instead of the non const getter method.

It makes no difference if you have s.th. like

class A {
    SomeType foo_;
protected:
    SomeType& foo() { return foo_; }

public:
    const SomeType& foo() const { return foo_; }
};

or

class A {
protected:
    SomeType foo_;

public:
    const SomeType& foo() const { return foo_; }
};
0

That is the nature behavior of C++, if the caller code the object of the class is non-const so the non-conversion, which is defined as protected one. You need defined the object of class as const or use const-cast on the object of the class, which will result that the const version of the method will be called.

#include <iostream>
class Foo {
    public:
        const void bar() const { std::cout << " const version called\n";}  
    protected:
        void bar() { std::cout << " non const version called\n";}  
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    const Foo c;
    c.bar(); // -> work

    Foo c1;
    c1.bar(); // compiler complain -> void Foo::bar() is protected
    const_cast<const Foo&>(c1).bar(); // fine 
}

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