19

I'm trying to allow POST requests from my javascript app hosted at localhost:80 to a WCF REStful service hosted at a different port, but somehow it doesn't work. I've tried adding custom properties to the header, as well as adding it programatically in my service's JSONData method but I'm still getting '405 Method not allowed' in my response. What is the proper approach here ?

This is my interface :

namespace RestService
{
    public class RestServiceImpl : IRestServiceImpl
    {
        #region IRestServiceImpl Members

        public string JSONData()
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
            return "Your POST request";
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

and the service code :

using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Web;
using System.Web.Script.Services;

namespace RestService
{

    [ServiceContract]
    public interface IRestServiceImpl
    {
        [OperationContract]
        [ScriptMethod]
        [WebInvoke(Method = "POST",
            ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json,
            BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare,
            UriTemplate = "export")]
        string JSONData();
    }
}

And finally the config :

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>

  <system.web>
    <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" />
  </system.web>
  <system.serviceModel>
    <services>
      <service name="RestService.RestServiceImpl" behaviorConfiguration="ServiceBehaviour">
        <endpoint address ="" binding="webHttpBinding" contract="RestService.IRestServiceImpl" behaviorConfiguration="web">
        </endpoint>
      </service>
    </services>

    <behaviors>
      <serviceBehaviors>
        <behavior name="ServiceBehaviour">
          <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/>
          <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/>
        </behavior>
      </serviceBehaviors>
      <endpointBehaviors>
        <behavior name="web">
          <webHttp/>
        </behavior>
      </endpointBehaviors>
    </behaviors>
    <serviceHostingEnvironment multipleSiteBindingsEnabled="true" />
  </system.serviceModel>
  <system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"/>
    <httpProtocol>
      <customHeaders>
         <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Origin" value="*" />
      </customHeaders>
</httpProtocol>  
  </system.webServer>

</configuration>
  • It would be very good question if you describe what "but somehow it doesn't work" means. – Alexei Levenkov Dec 27 '12 at 0:34
  • 1
    I've updated the description. – mike_hornbeck Dec 27 '12 at 10:48
33

This worked better for me than the Web.config version:

Create a Global.asax

Add this method to the Global.asax.cs:

using System.Web;

namespace StackOverflow
{
    public class Global : System.Web.HttpApplication
    {
        protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
            if (HttpContext.Current.Request.HttpMethod == "OPTIONS")
            {
                HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET, POST");
                HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Accept");
                HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "1728000");
                HttpContext.Current.Response.End();
            }
        }
    }
}

Ref: http://www.dotnet-tricks.com/Tutorial/wcf/X8QN260412-Calling-Cross-Domain-WCF-Service-using-Jquery.html

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks a lot! finally got the exact solution, after searching a lot. – Vikrant Mar 18 '15 at 10:11
  • Great this finally worked after a couple of hours researching. Thanks bru! – Jav T Mar 27 '15 at 17:38
  • You saved my lot of R&D hours. I really wanted to vote up more than one time :)..Thank you – khichar.anil May 5 '16 at 19:57
  • As usual: What are the namespaces used? Please be specific, because my VS does not find it itslef. – Florian Castelain Jul 3 '18 at 10:28
  • 1
    namespace: System.Web – Robert Sep 6 '18 at 11:56
14

Add these nodes to your Web.config:

<configuration>
  <system.webServer>
    <httpProtocol>
      <customHeaders>
        <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Origin" value="*"/>
        <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Headers" value="Content-Type, Accept" />
        <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Methods" value="POST,GET,OPTIONS" />
        <add name="Access-Control-Max-Age" value="1728000" />
      </customHeaders>
    </httpProtocol>
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

Ref: http://theagilecoder.wordpress.com/2014/07/07/wcf-and-cors-no-access-control-allow-origin-header-is-present-on-the-requested-resource/

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  • Worked perfect for me! – FranP Nov 9 '17 at 0:30
9

Enabling CORS for non-GET requests requires more than just setting the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header - it also needs to deal with preflight requests, which are OPTIONS requests which ask the server whether it's safe to perform operations which can potentially change data (e.g., POST, PUT, DELETE) before the actual request is sent.

I've written a blog post about adding CORS support for WCF. It's not the simplest of the implementations, but hopefully the code in the post can be simply copied / pasted into your project. The post can be found at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/carlosfigueira/archive/2012/05/15/implementing-cors-support-in-wcf.aspx.

|improve this answer|||||
  • That's almost what I need. But I've noticed that it doesn't work if you send the data as a json. Your exabple page sends a single string value with the POST request. Or maybe it's because ExtJS handles the request data differently than jQuery :/ – mike_hornbeck Dec 27 '12 at 11:25
  • The example does send data as JSON - the inputs to the POST / PUT methods are JSON strings (notice that the input is wrapped in "'s). It works for objects as well, it's just that in the example the operation takes a string as a parameter. – carlosfigueira Dec 27 '12 at 15:53
  • I've changed the data in the test page to ` var data = { foo: "bar" };` and I'm getting 400 Bad request. I've checked the logs but nothing helpful there. So should I make changes also in the WCF itself to support it ? – mike_hornbeck Dec 27 '12 at 17:03
  • Yes - in that case the operation must take a parameter of a user type, with a string field named 'foo'. If the operation takes a string, you should pass a string; you can only pass an object if the operation takes an object as a parameter. – carlosfigueira Dec 27 '12 at 17:32
  • 1
    It shouldn't be Object, but a data type which maps to the JSON you want to send. For example, if your class has a string property called "Foo", it should be able to accept the JSON object {"Foo":"hello world"} as input. – carlosfigueira Dec 27 '12 at 22:33
0

The following .NET code (global.asax) has an important difference that in stead of *, it can be better to echo back the Origin domain because this enables authentication over CORS (e.g. NTLM / Kerberos) as well as the Preflight.

void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Request.HttpMethod == "OPTIONS")
    {
        Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET, POST");
        Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Accept");
        Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "1728000");
        Response.End();
    }
    else
    {
        Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Credentials", "true");

        if (Request.Headers["Origin"] != null)
            Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin" , Request.Headers["Origin"]);
        else
            Response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin" , "*");
    }
}
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