135

I have the following two lists:

first = [1,2,3,4,5]
second = [6,7,8,9,10]

Now I want to add the items from both of these lists into a new list.

output should be

third = [7,9,11,13,15]

21 Answers 21

215

The zip function is useful here, used with a list comprehension.

[x + y for x, y in zip(first, second)]

If you have a list of lists (instead of just two lists):

lists_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]]
[sum(x) for x in zip(*lists_of_lists)]
# -> [5, 7, 9]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    just curious how would zip() handles if array lengths for different? i.e what does zip returns for different array lengths and how would that affect the operation for x + y – ealeon Oct 24 '15 at 15:00
  • 7
    @ealeon: The "zipping" stops when the shortest iterable is exhausted. So if first is length 10 and second is length 6, the result of zipping the iterables will be length 6. – tom Oct 27 '15 at 17:12
  • I think it's more useful than other answer cuz you can do useful stuff like take average or give different weight to each elements in the array and combine them – seokhoonlee Mar 23 '16 at 17:29
  • Is there a way to do this when you don't know the number of lists? – traggatmot Jun 3 '16 at 5:07
  • @traggatmot: >>> lists_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]] >>> [sum(x) for x in zip(*lists_of_lists)] [5, 7, 9] – tom Jun 3 '16 at 23:34
49

From docs

import operator
list(map(operator.add, first,second))
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    you meant: list(map(operator.add, first,second)) – Ghanem Oct 11 '18 at 19:06
26

Assuming both lists a and b have same length, you do not need zip, numpy or anything else.

Python 2.x and 3.x:

[a[i]+b[i] for i in range(len(a))]
| improve this answer | |
  • this seems pretty good, if we have to calculate resultant sum list for more than 2 lists – lazarus Jan 27 '15 at 10:38
25

Default behavior in numpy is add componentwise

import numpy as np
np.add(first, second)

which outputs

array([7,9,11,13,15])
| improve this answer | |
  • By far the best answer – Ian Jun 23 '17 at 17:44
  • It should work, but in my experiments it does not... I don't know why, but numpy seems to me a poweful library as well as a complicated one... – decadenza Jul 23 '17 at 10:49
  • @decadenza How did you do the experiment? – Ashfaq Jan 9 '18 at 15:54
  • Hi @Ashfaq, many months passed and I've learned better the Numpy library. I was wrong in the np.array definition. Sorry. – decadenza Jan 10 '18 at 18:42
  • use np.add(first, second).tolist() to get the result in a list – talekeDskobeDa Feb 4 '19 at 16:15
11

This extends itself to any number of lists:

[sum(sublist) for sublist in itertools.izip(*myListOfLists)]

In your case, myListOfLists would be [first, second]

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Are you sure about izip.from_iterable? – DSM Dec 27 '12 at 7:50
  • 1
    @DSM: damnit! I think I was thinking of chain. Updated – inspectorG4dget Dec 27 '12 at 15:47
9

Try the following code:

first = [1, 2, 3, 4]
second = [2, 3, 4, 5]
third = map(sum, zip(first, second))
| improve this answer | |
  • +1 for this compact and self explanatory solution. It's worth noting that this works for more than 2 lists as well: map(sum, zip(first, second, third, fourth, ...)) – Johan Dettmar Oct 5 '18 at 20:54
6

The easy way and fast way to do this is:

three = [sum(i) for i in zip(first,second)] # [7,9,11,13,15]

Alternatively, you can use numpy sum:

from numpy import sum
three = sum([first,second], axis=0) # array([7,9,11,13,15])
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This generalizes nicely to longer lists of lists, which is just what I needed! – Vectornaut May 21 '15 at 2:40
5
first = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
second = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
three = map(lambda x,y: x+y,first,second)
print three



Output 
[7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
| improve this answer | |
3

one-liner solution

list(map(lambda x,y: x+y, a,b))
| improve this answer | |
2

My answer is repeated with Thiru's that answered it in Mar 17 at 9:25.

It was simpler and quicker, here are his solutions:

The easy way and fast way to do this is:

 three = [sum(i) for i in zip(first,second)] # [7,9,11,13,15]

Alternatively, you can use numpy sum:

 from numpy import sum
 three = sum([first,second], axis=0) # array([7,9,11,13,15])

You need numpy!

numpy array could do some operation like vectors

import numpy as np
a = [1,2,3,4,5]
b = [6,7,8,9,10]
c = list(np.array(a) + np.array(b))
print c
# [7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
| improve this answer | |
2

If you have an unknown number of lists of the same length, you can use the below function.

Here the *args accepts a variable number of list arguments (but only sums the same number of elements in each). The * is used again to unpack the elements in each of the lists.

def sum_lists(*args):
    return list(map(sum, zip(*args)))

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]  

sum_lists(a,b)

Output:

[2, 4, 6]

Or with 3 lists

sum_lists([5,5,5,5,5], [10,10,10,10,10], [4,4,4,4,4])

Output:

[19, 19, 19, 19, 19]
| improve this answer | |
1

You can use zip(), which will "interleave" the two arrays together, and then map(), which will apply a function to each element in an iterable:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> b = [6,7,8,9,10]
>>> zip(a, b)
[(1, 6), (2, 7), (3, 8), (4, 9), (5, 10)]
>>> map(lambda x: x[0] + x[1], zip(a, b))
[7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
| improve this answer | |
1

Here is another way to do it. We make use of the internal __add__ function of python:

class SumList(object):
    def __init__(self, this_list):
        self.mylist = this_list

    def __add__(self, other):
        new_list = []
        zipped_list = zip(self.mylist, other.mylist)
        for item in zipped_list:
            new_list.append(item[0] + item[1])
        return SumList(new_list)

    def __repr__(self):
        return str(self.mylist)

list1 = SumList([1,2,3,4,5])
list2 = SumList([10,20,30,40,50])
sum_list1_list2 = list1 + list2
print(sum_list1_list2)

Output

[11, 22, 33, 44, 55]
| improve this answer | |
1

If you want to add also the rest of the values in the lists you can use this (this is working in Python3.5)

def addVectors(v1, v2):
    sum = [x + y for x, y in zip(v1, v2)]
    if not len(v1) >= len(v2):
        sum += v2[len(v1):]
    else:
        sum += v1[len(v2):]

    return sum


#for testing 
if __name__=='__main__':
    a = [1, 2]
    b = [1, 2, 3, 4]
    print(a)
    print(b)
    print(addVectors(a,b))
| improve this answer | |
1
    first = [1,2,3,4,5]
    second = [6,7,8,9,10]
    #one way
    third = [x + y for x, y in zip(first, second)]
    print("third" , third) 
    #otherway
    fourth = []
    for i,j in zip(first,second):
        global fourth
        fourth.append(i + j)
    print("fourth" , fourth )
#third [7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
#fourth [7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
| improve this answer | |
1

Here is another way to do it.It is working fine for me .

N=int(input())
num1 = list(map(int, input().split()))
num2 = list(map(int, input().split()))
sum=[]

for i in range(0,N):
  sum.append(num1[i]+num2[i])

for element in sum:
  print(element, end=" ")

print("")
| improve this answer | |
1
j = min(len(l1), len(l2))
l3 = [l1[i]+l2[i] for i in range(j)]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    While this code snippet may be the solution, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Narendra Jadhav Jul 21 '18 at 5:53
1

Perhaps the simplest approach:

first = [1,2,3,4,5]
second = [6,7,8,9,10]
three=[]

for i in range(0,5):
    three.append(first[i]+second[i])

print(three)
| improve this answer | |
1

If you consider your lists as numpy array, then you need to easily sum them:

import numpy as np

third = np.array(first) + np.array(second)

print third

[7, 9, 11, 13, 15]
| improve this answer | |
0

What if you have list with different length, then you can try something like this (using zip_longest)

from itertools import zip_longest  # izip_longest for python2.x

l1 = [1, 2, 3]
l2 = [4, 5, 6, 7]

>>> list(map(sum, zip_longest(l1, l2, fillvalue=0)))
[5, 7, 9, 7]
| improve this answer | |
-2

You can use this method but it will work only if both the list are of the same size:

first = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
second = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
third = []

a = len(first)
b = int(0)
while True:
    x = first[b]
    y = second[b]
    ans = x + y
    third.append(ans)
    b = b + 1
    if b == a:
        break

print third
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.