76

I'm trying to multiply two existing columns in a pandas Dataframe (orders_df): Prices (stock close price) and Amount (stock quantities) and add the calculation to a new column called Value. For some reason when I run this code, all the rows under the Value column are positive numbers, while some of the rows should be negative. Under the Action column in the DataFrame there are seven rows with the 'Sell' string and seven with the 'Buy' string.

for i in orders_df.Action:
 if i  == 'Sell':
  orders_df['Value'] = orders_df.Prices*orders_df.Amount
 elif i == 'Buy':
  orders_df['Value'] = -orders_df.Prices*orders_df.Amount)

Please let me know what i'm doing wrong !

0

8 Answers 8

89

I think an elegant solution is to use the where method (also see the API docs):

In [37]: values = df.Prices * df.Amount

In [38]: df['Values'] = values.where(df.Action == 'Sell', other=-values)

In [39]: df
Out[39]: 
   Prices  Amount Action  Values
0       3      57   Sell     171
1      89      42   Sell    3738
2      45      70    Buy   -3150
3       6      43   Sell     258
4      60      47   Sell    2820
5      19      16    Buy    -304
6      56      89   Sell    4984
7       3      28    Buy     -84
8      56      69   Sell    3864
9      90      49    Buy   -4410

Further more this should be the fastest solution.

3
  • 5
    could you indicate that this answers your question? Feb 9, 2013 at 20:03
  • 3
    Mark this as your answer, @OAK
    – Blairg23
    Apr 11, 2016 at 23:31
  • from a performance profiling standpoint, what's the memory efficient way to do this? Sep 5, 2016 at 5:58
35

You can use the DataFrame apply method:

order_df['Value'] = order_df.apply(lambda row: (row['Prices']*row['Amount']
                                               if row['Action']=='Sell'
                                               else -row['Prices']*row['Amount']),
                                   axis=1)

It is usually faster to use these methods rather than over for loops.

0
25

If we're willing to sacrifice the succinctness of Hayden's solution, one could also do something like this:

In [22]: orders_df['C'] = orders_df.Action.apply(
               lambda x: (1 if x == 'Sell' else -1))

In [23]: orders_df   # New column C represents the sign of the transaction
Out[23]:
   Prices  Amount Action  C
0       3      57   Sell  1
1      89      42   Sell  1
2      45      70    Buy -1
3       6      43   Sell  1
4      60      47   Sell  1
5      19      16    Buy -1
6      56      89   Sell  1
7       3      28    Buy -1
8      56      69   Sell  1
9      90      49    Buy -1

Now we have eliminated the need for the if statement. Using DataFrame.apply(), we also do away with the for loop. As Hayden noted, vectorized operations are always faster.

In [24]: orders_df['Value'] = orders_df.Prices * orders_df.Amount * orders_df.C

In [25]: orders_df   # The resulting dataframe
Out[25]:
   Prices  Amount Action  C  Value
0       3      57   Sell  1    171
1      89      42   Sell  1   3738
2      45      70    Buy -1  -3150
3       6      43   Sell  1    258
4      60      47   Sell  1   2820
5      19      16    Buy -1   -304
6      56      89   Sell  1   4984
7       3      28    Buy -1    -84
8      56      69   Sell  1   3864
9      90      49    Buy -1  -4410

This solution takes two lines of code instead of one, but is a bit easier to read. I suspect that the computational costs are similar as well.

1
  • 2
    Just for nitpicking one should be consistent with the notation, namely if you use df['column_name'] on the left hand side, you should do likewise on the right hand side, instead of df.column_name.
    – gented
    Jun 18, 2018 at 14:51
9

Since this question came up again, I think a good clean approach is using assign.

The code is quite expressive and self-describing:

df = df.assign(Value = lambda x: x.Prices * x.Amount * x.Action.replace({'Buy' : 1, 'Sell' : -1}))
4
  • Elegant code. But could you care to explain to me why I shall use lambda x in this case instead of df? Never used lambda in pandas. What is the input for the lambda x function in this case? Thanks.
    – Bowen Liu
    Dec 3, 2018 at 14:52
  • 1
    You're right, in this case we could have easily used df and get rid of the lambda. To be honest, I typically use lambda when the name of the dataframe is long and the expressions would become too verbose. In this case 'df' is short enough! The input 'x' if the lambda will be exactly df
    – FLab
    Dec 3, 2018 at 14:58
  • Thanks a lot! I never used lambda with pandas before so I wasn't sure. Now I know. Thanks for clarifying it. I will do the same thing as I found naming dataframes with just df, df1, df2 etc is not clear enough
    – Bowen Liu
    Dec 3, 2018 at 15:09
  • Another advantage of using lambda in practice (this particular problem is too simple to make a difference) is that you can chain transformations to your dataframe. Without lambda, you'd have to declare variables for each step so you can reference the new dataframe for a subsequent call to assign or loc or many of the other pandas functions. Jan 13, 2020 at 13:04
3

To make things neat, I take Hayden's solution but make a small function out of it.

def create_value(row):
    if row['Action'] == 'Sell':
        return row['Prices'] * row['Amount']
    else:
        return -row['Prices']*row['Amount']

so that when we want to apply the function to our dataframe, we can do..

df['Value'] = df.apply(lambda row: create_value(row), axis=1)

...and any modifications only need to occur in the small function itself.

Concise, Readable, and Neat!

0

For me, this is the clearest and most intuitive:

values = []
for action in ['Sell','Buy']:
    amounts = orders_df['Amounts'][orders_df['Action'==action]].values
    if action == 'Sell':
        prices = orders_df['Prices'][orders_df['Action'==action]].values
    else:
        prices = -1*orders_df['Prices'][orders_df['Action'==action]].values
    values += list(amounts*prices)  
orders_df['Values'] = values

The .values method returns a numpy array allowing you to easily multiply element-wise and then you can cumulatively generate a list by 'adding' to it.

0

Good solution from bmu. I think it's more readable to put the values inside the parentheses vs outside.

    df['Values'] = np.where(df.Action == 'Sell', 
                            df.Prices*df.Amount, 
                           -df.Prices*df.Amount)

Using some pandas built in functions.

    df['Values'] = np.where(df.Action.eq('Sell'), 
                            df.Prices.mul(df.Amount), 
                           -df.Prices.mul(df.Amount))
0

First, multiply the columns Prices and Amount. Afterwards use mask to negate the values if the condition is True:

df.assign(
    Values=(df["Prices"] * df["Amount"]).mask(df["Action"] == "Buy", lambda x: -x)
)

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