I need a way to tell what mode the shell is in from within the shell.

I've tried looking at the platform module but it seems only to tell you about "about the bit architecture and the linkage format used for the executable": the binary is compiled as 64bit though (I'm running on OS X 10.6) so it seems to always report 64bit even though I'm using the methods described here to force 32bit mode).

  • 1
    Just out of interest: Why do you need to know? – Lennart Regebro Sep 10 '09 at 15:18
  • 1
    I'm having problems building and loading some modules on OS X 10.6. Specifically pysco, which is complaining I'm running in 64bit mode. This is under a virtualenv as well so there is some extra complications I need to work through... – jkp Sep 10 '09 at 17:24
  • I'd like to know because when I use something like PyInstaller to create a stand-alone binary distributable (to give to users who might not have (the right version of) Python installed, the binary I produce will be 32/64 bit depending on the Python I run PyInstaller with. Ideally I'm thinking I'd like to automatically name the resulting binary/archive file with '32' or '64' in the filename, rather than having to manually rename the files depending on where I execute the 'make' command from. – Jonathan Hartley Jan 19 '16 at 4:48

13 Answers 13

up vote 334 down vote accepted

UPDATED: One way is to look at sys.maxsize as documented here:

$ python-32 -c 'import sys;print("%x" % sys.maxsize, sys.maxsize > 2**32)'
('7fffffff', False)
$ python-64 -c 'import sys;print("%x" % sys.maxsize, sys.maxsize > 2**32)'
('7fffffffffffffff', True)

sys.maxsize was introduced in Python 2.6. If you need a test for older systems, this slightly more complicated test should work on all Python 2 and 3 releases:

$ python-32 -c 'import struct;print( 8 * struct.calcsize("P"))'
32
$ python-64 -c 'import struct;print( 8 * struct.calcsize("P"))'
64

BTW, you might be tempted to use platform.architecture() for this. Unfortunately, its results are not always reliable, particularly in the case of OS X universal binaries.

$ arch -x86_64 /usr/bin/python2.6 -c 'import sys,platform; print platform.architecture()[0], sys.maxsize > 2**32'
64bit True
$ arch -i386 /usr/bin/python2.6 -c 'import sys,platform; print platform.architecture()[0], sys.maxsize > 2**32'
64bit False
  • 9
    Using sys.maxint will not work to detect a 64-bit Python when running Windows (see here). Instead, use struct.calcsize("P") for a cross-platform solution. – Luke Moore Mar 29 '11 at 17:42
  • Interesting. Does sys.maxsize work for 64-bit Windows? – Ned Deily Mar 29 '11 at 18:19
  • 3
    Yes, sys.maxsize works for 64-bit Windows. – Luke Moore Mar 30 '11 at 14:36
  • 2
    Yinon, that's true but that's not what the question asked for. And, on those CPUs where it is possible to run, say, either 32-bit or 64-bit binaries, the arch of the machine is usually not all that relevant to a Python program; what matters is what arch the Python interpreter itself is running as. – Ned Deily Jun 23 '15 at 7:18
  • 3
    On windows cmd, you need to put the double quotes on the outside and the single quotes on the inside or else it will produce a syntax error. That's probably because windows thinks spaces between single-quotes are still argument delimiters. It may be helpful to adjust this answer to accommodate that fact. – Steven Bluen Dec 28 '16 at 20:38

When starting the Python interpreter in the terminal/command line you may also see a line like:

Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 14:24:46) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32

Where [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] means 64-bit Python. Works for my particular setup.

  • 5
    so this is what? 64bit python or 32bit python? – phpJs Feb 28 '13 at 5:06
  • 7
    @phpJs 64 bit because of [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] – Eduard Florinescu Aug 5 '13 at 12:34
  • 11
    Unfortunately only works for Windows versions of Python. My OSX installation returns Python 2.7.8 (v2.7.8:ee879c0ffa11, Jun 29, 2014, 21:07:35) [GCC 4.2.1 (Apple In. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin – aodj Aug 13 '14 at 16:12
  • 1
    Doesn't work on linux either. – memecs Sep 8 '14 at 16:34
  • 6
    On cygwin, you get this answer: Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 25 2014, 14:04:36) [GCC 4.8.3] on cygwin – Jonno_FTW Nov 10 '14 at 4:15

Basically a variant on Matthew Marshall's answer (with struct from the std.library):

import struct
print struct.calcsize("P") * 8
  • 1
    Imho, better than ctypes version - works even with older Python. – yk4ever May 2 '10 at 21:34
  • 5
    Very useful, can be used in one line. $ python -c 'import struct; print struct.calcsize("P") * 8' – Sun Liwen Apr 23 '12 at 9:43
  • 1
    nice, easy n clean :-) – Raúl Jun 21 '16 at 10:31
  • very smart solution, cheers – Peggy Feb 25 at 22:40

Try using ctypes to get the size of a void pointer:

import ctypes
print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)

It'll be 4 for 32 bit or 8 for 64 bit.

  • 1
    That works, too, although it does have the possible slight disadvantage of an unnecessary import and module load if you don't otherwise need ctypes: the sys module, otoh, is compiled into the interpreter. – Ned Deily Sep 10 '09 at 16:32
  • please help me understand: on my 64b installation python -c 'import ctypes; print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)' returns 8. Or should it be python -c 'import ctypes; print ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp) * 8' ? – lukmdo Jul 14 '12 at 11:11
  • The function returns the size in bytes (4 or 8). If you need the size in bits (32 or 64) you have to multiply with 8. b_is_python_64bit = (ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp) == 8) – phobie Sep 26 '12 at 12:44
  • Just call python -c "import ctypes; print(32 if ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_voidp)==4 else 64, 'bit CPU')" – vitiral Oct 27 '14 at 20:22

Open python console:

import platform
platform.architecture()[0]

it should display the '64bit' or '32bit' according to your platform.

Alternatively( in case of OS X binaries ):

import sys
sys.maxsize > 2**32 
# it should display True in case of 64bit and False in case of 32bit

For a non-programmatic solution, look in the Activity Monitor. It lists the architecture of 64-bit processes as “Intel (64-bit)”.

  • 1
    A very nice alternative answer for those of us using Mac OS 10.x.x Thank you! – mkelley33 Jul 4 '10 at 4:04

On my Centos Linux system I did the following:

1) Started the Python interpreter (I'm using 2.6.6)
2) Ran the following code:

import platform
print(platform.architecture())

and it gave me

(64bit, 'ELF')
  • Wasn't this solution described as non-working for him by the OP? – Antony Hatchkins Feb 18 '16 at 21:11
  • That may be, but this is EXACTLY what I needed; sorry to +1 a "wrong answer", but I needed this badly. – UnsettlingTrend Aug 3 '16 at 18:43
  • This solution is perfect for Solaris 11. – Steven Wolfe Jun 21 '17 at 5:48

platform.architecture() notes say:

Note: On Mac OS X (and perhaps other platforms), executable files may be universal files containing multiple architectures.

To get at the “64-bitness” of the current interpreter, it is more reliable to query the sys.maxsize attribute:

import sys
is_64bits = sys.maxsize > 2**32

struct.calcsize("P") returns size of the bytes required to store a single pointer. On a 32-bit system, it would return 4 bytes. On a 64-bit system, it would return 8 bytes.

So the following would return 32 if you're running 32-bit python and 64 if you're running 64-bit python:

Python 2

import struct;print struct.calcsize("P") * 8

Python 3

import struct;print(struct.calcsize("P") * 8)
C:\Users\xyz>python

Python 2.7.6 (default, Nov XY ..., 19:24:24) **[MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win
32**
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

after hitting python in cmd

import sys
print(sys.version)

3.5.1 (v3.5.1:37a07cee5969, Dec 6 2015, 01:54:25) [MSC v.1900 64 bit (AMD64)]

Grouping everything...

Considering that:

  • The question is asked for OSX (I have a cracked old VM with an ancient Python version)
  • My main env is Win
  • The 32bit Python I only installed on on Win (and I built a "krippled" one on Lnx)

I'm going to exemplify on all 3 platforms. I'll be using Python3 and Python2. Doc URLs however, will be Python3 specific.

  1. Check [Python]: sys.maxsize value - compare it to 0x100000000 (2 ** 32): greater for 64bit, smaller for 32bit:
    • OSX9 x64:
      • Python2.7.10 x64:
        >>> import sys
        >>> "Python {:s} on {:s}".format(sys.version, sys.platform)
        'Python 2.7.10 (default, Oct 14 2015, 05:51:29) \n[GCC 4.8.2] on darwin'
        >>> hex(sys.maxsize), sys.maxsize > 0x100000000
        ('0x7fffffffffffffff', True)
        
    • Ubtu16 x64:
      • Python3.5.2 x64:
        >>> import sys
        >>> "Python {:s} on {:s}".format(sys.version, sys.platform)
        'Python 3.5.2 (default, Nov 23 2017, 16:37:01) \n[GCC 5.4.0 20160609] on linux'
        >>> hex(sys.maxsize), sys.maxsize > 0x100000000
        ('0x7fffffffffffffff', True)
        
      • Python3.6.4 x86:
        >>> import sys
        >>> "Python {:s} on {:s}".format(sys.version, sys.platform)
        'Python 3.6.4 (default, Apr 25 2018, 23:55:56) \n[GCC 5.4.0 20160609] on linux'
        >>> hex(sys.maxsize), sys.maxsize > 0x100000000
        ('0x7fffffff', False)
        
    • Win10 x64:
      • Python3.5.4 x64:
        >>> import sys
        >>> "Python {:s} on {:s}".format(sys.version, sys.platform)
        'Python 3.5.4 (v3.5.4:3f56838, Aug  8 2017, 02:17:05) [MSC v.1900 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32'
        >>> hex(sys.maxsize), sys.maxsize > 0x100000000
        ('0x7fffffffffffffff', True)
        
      • Python3.6.2 x86:
        >>> import sys
        >>> "Python {:s} on {:s}".format(sys.version, sys.platform)
        'Python 3.6.2 (v3.6.2:5fd33b5, Jul  8 2017, 04:14:34) [MSC v.1900 32 bit (Intel)] on win32'
        >>> hex(sys.maxsize), sys.maxsize > 0x100000000
        ('0x7fffffff', False)
        


  1. Use [Python]: struct.calcsize(fmt) to determine the object size produced by the (pointer) format. In other words, determines the pointer size (sizeof(void*)):
    • OSX9 x64:
      • Python2.7.10 x64:
        >>> import struct
        >>> truct.calcsize("P") * 8
        64
        
    • Ubtu16 x64:
      • Python3.5.2 x64:
        >>> import struct
        >>> truct.calcsize("P") * 8
        64
        
      • Python3.6.4 x86:
        >>> import struct
        >>> truct.calcsize("P") * 8
        32
        
    • Win10 x64:
      • Python3.5.4 x64:
        >>> import struct
        >>> truct.calcsize("P") * 8
        64
        
      • Python3.6.2 x86:
        >>> import struct
        >>> truct.calcsize("P") * 8
        32
        


  1. Use [Python]: ctypes - A foreign function library for Python. It also boils down to determining the size of a pointer (sizeof(void*)). As a note, ctypes uses #2. (not necessarily for this task) via "${PYTHON_SRC_DIR}/Lib/ctypes/__init__.py" (around line #15):
    • OSX9 x64:
      • Python2.7.10 x64:
        >>> import ctypes
        >>> ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_void_p) * 8
        64
        
    • Ubtu16 x64:
      • Python3.5.2 x64:
        >>> import ctypes
        >>> ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_void_p) * 8
        64
        
      • Python3.6.4 x86:
        >>> import ctypes
        >>> ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_void_p) * 8
        32
        
    • Win10 x64:
      • Python3.5.4 x64:
        >>> import ctypes
        >>> ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_void_p) * 8
        64
        
      • Python3.6.2 x86:
        >>> import ctypes
        >>> ctypes.sizeof(ctypes.c_void_p) * 8
        32
        


  1. [Python]: platform.architecture(executable=sys.executable, bits='', linkage='') !!! NOT reliable on OSX !!! due to multi arch executable (or .dylib) format (in some cases, uses #2.):
    • OSX9 x64:
      • Python2.7.10 x64:
        >>> import platform
        >>> platform.architecture()
        ('64bit', '')
        
    • Ubtu16 x64:
      • Python3.5.2 x64:
        >>> import platform
        >>> platform.architecture()
        ('64bit', 'ELF')
        
      • Python3.6.4 x86:
        >>> import platform
        >>> platform.architecture()
        ('32bit', 'ELF')
        
    • Win10 x64:
      • Python3.5.4 x64:
        >>> import platform
        >>> platform.architecture()
        ('64bit', 'WindowsPE')
        
      • Python3.6.2 x86:
        >>> import platform
        >>> platform.architecture()
        ('32bit', 'WindowsPE')
        


  1. Lame workaround (gainarie) - invoke an external command ([man7]: FILE(1)) via [Python]: os.system(command). The limitations of #4. apply (sometimes it might not even work):
    • OSX9 x64:
      • Python2.7.10 x64:
        >>> import os
        >>> os.system("file {:s}".format(os.path.realpath(sys.executable)))
        /opt/OPSWbuildtools/2.0.6/bin/python2.7.global: Mach-O 64-bit executable x86_64
        
    • Ubtu16 x64:
      • Python3.5.2 x64:
        >>> import os
        >>> os.system("file {:s}".format(os.path.realpath(sys.executable)))
        /usr/bin/python3.5: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2, for GNU/Linux 2.6.32, BuildID[sha1]=59a8ef36ca241df24686952480966d7bc0d7c6ea, stripped
        
      • Python3.6.4 x86:
        >>> import os
        >>> os.system("file {:s}".format(os.path.realpath(sys.executable)))
        /home/cfati/Work/Dev/Python-3.6.4/python: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux.so.2, for GNU/Linux 2.6.32, BuildID[sha1]=5c3d4eeadbd13cd91445d08f90722767b0747de2, not stripped
        
    • Win10 x64:
      • file utility is not present, there are other 3rd Party tools that can be used, but I'm not going to insist on them


Win specific:

  1. Check env vars (e.g. %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% (or others)) via [Python]: os.environ:
    • Win10 x64:
      • Python3.5.4 x64:
        >>> import os
        >>> os.environ["PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"]
        'AMD64'
        
      • Python3.6.2 x86:
        >>> import os
        >>> os.environ["PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"]
        'x86'
        


  1. [Python]: sys.version (also displayed in the 1st line when starting the interpreter)
    • Check #1.

Platform Architecture is not the reliable way. Instead us:

$ arch -i386 /usr/local/bin/python2.7
Python 2.7.9 (v2.7.9:648dcafa7e5f, Dec 10 2014, 10:10:46)
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import platform, sys
>>> platform.architecture(), sys.maxsize
(('64bit', ''), 2147483647)
>>> ^D
$ arch -x86_64 /usr/local/bin/python2.7
Python 2.7.9 (v2.7.9:648dcafa7e5f, Dec 10 2014, 10:10:46)
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import platform, sys
>>> platform.architecture(), sys.maxsize
(('64bit', ''), 9223372036854775807)

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