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Being new to ANTLR I am trying to figure out how stringtemplates work. I would like to generate a piece of Java code based on a very simple input file. Because of its flexible concept I would like to use (string)templates. In Java, one typically has to generate member declaration, initialize them somewhere else, and use them in even another place. The identifier names should match and are thus repeated. This means little template instantiations are needed here and there. Surely it can be done, but I cannot seem to find out how, maybe I am missing some important 'clue'?

I wrote a test program to investigate the concept. It takes a simple input file:

red = #FF0000
green = #00FF00
blue = #0000FF

and should produce something like the following output:

class MyColors {
  // Class members
  public java.awt.Color red;
  public java.awt.Color green;
  public java.awt.Color blue;

  // Constructor
  /* Question: How to access the right initializer value here?!? The values are not accessible at this level of the grammar*/
  public MyColors() {
    red = java.awt.Color.getColor("#FF0000");
    green = java.awt.Color.getColor("#00FF00");
    blue = java.awt.Color.getColor("#0000FF");
  }
};

...where the names of the variables and initializers in the constructor are filled in according to the input.

The grammar I have defined is as follows:

grammar Test;

options {
    output=template;
}

colors: (a+=def)+ -> colorClassDef(name={$a});

def: ident '=' name -> colorDef(id={$ident.text}, name={$name.text});

ident: ID;

name: ID;

ID: ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'#'|'0'..'9')+;
WS: (' '|'\t'|'\r'|'\n')+ { skip(); };

The template definitions are as follows:

group Test;

colorClassDef(name, id) ::= <<
class MyColors {
// Class members
<name:{ v | public java.awt.Color <v>;
}>
// Constructor
/* Question: How to access the initializer value here?!? */
public MyColors() {
<name:{ v | <v> = java.awt.Color.getColor("<id>");
}>
}
};
>>

/* How to return both id and name here seperately, as ID should go into the declaration and name should to into the init? */
colorDef(id, name) ::= <<
<id>
>>

Can anyone suggest how I can get <id> and <name> out of the rule 'def' inorder to include them in the right portion of the generated code?

I have found multiple questions regarding multiple return values, like Returning multiple values in ANTLR rule and antlr2 return multiple values, but none include stringtemplates. I even bought 'the book' and worked my way trought the java bytecode generator, but did not find my answer there. All examples seem to generate one bit of output for one bit of input. (No regrets though, the book makes excellent bed-time reading ;-)

Can anyone point out to me what clue I am missing? What would be the most appropriate way to fix this problem? Some examplary code and pointers to the documentation would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Maarten

1

Can anyone suggest how I can get and out of the rule 'def' inorder to include them in the right portion of the generated code?

Here's a straight-forward Java-centric approach to getting what you want. It's not as graceful as I would like (I assume there's room for improvement), but I think it solves the problem without a great deal of hassle. I renamed a few things, but I think I kept the spirit of your approach intact.

First, the template. Note that template colorClassDef requires every bit of information that's determined by the grammar: every id, every name, and the association between each id with its corresponding name. Here's one of accessing all of that from the template:

group Colors;

colorClassDef(ids, colors) ::= <<
class MyColors {
// Class members
<ids:{ id | public java.awt.Color <id>;
}>

// Constructor
public MyColors() {
<ids:{ id | <id> = java.awt.Color.getColor("<colors.(id)>");
}>
}
};
>>

Here I'm using parameter ids to store a list of all the incoming ids and parameter colors to store a map that associates an id (the key) to a name (the value). For the constructor portion, ST accesses the id's name from colors with the "indirect property lookup" syntax: <colors.(id)>. Since colors is a map, id is used as a key into the map and the value is written into the template.

Template colorClassDef handles everything, so I removed template colorDef.

Second, the grammar. It needs to provide the ids and color map. Here's one way of doing that:

grammar Colors;

options {
    output=template;
}

colors 
@init {
        java.util.LinkedList<String> ids = new java.util.LinkedList<String>(); 
        java.util.HashMap<String, String> colors = new java.util.HashMap<String, String>();
    }
    : (ident '=' name 
            {ids.add($ident.text); colors.put($ident.text, $name.text);}
      )+ EOF 
        -> colorClassDef(ids={ids}, colors={colors})
    ;

ident: ID;

name: ID;

ID: ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'#'|'0'..'9')+;
WS: (' '|'\t'|'\r'|'\n')+ { skip(); };

(To keep the grammar relatively simple, I merged rules colors and def into colors.)

Each ident is added to list ids and each name is added to map colors as the value to the corresponding ident key. Then off they go to the template.

Here is a test class to test out the works:

public class ColorsTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        final String code = "red = #FF0000\ngreen = #00FF00\nblue = #0000FF"; 

        process(code, "Colors.stg");

    }

    private static void process(final String code, String templateResourceName)
            throws IOException, RecognitionException, Exception {
        CharStream input = new ANTLRStringStream(code);
        ColorsLexer lexer = new ColorsLexer(input);
        CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);

        ColorsParser parser = new ColorsParser(tokens);

        InputStream stream = ColorsTest.class.getResourceAsStream(templateResourceName);
        Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(stream);
        parser.setTemplateLib(new StringTemplateGroup(reader));
        reader.close();
        stream.close();

        ColorsParser.colors_return result = parser.colors();

        if (parser.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() > 0){
            throw new Exception("Syntax Errors encountered!");
        }

        System.out.println(result.toString());
    }
}

Here's a test case based on the input in your question.

Input

red = #FF0000
green = #00FF00
blue = #0000FF

Output

class MyColors {
// Class members
public java.awt.Color red;
public java.awt.Color green;
public java.awt.Color blue;


// Constructor
public MyColors() {
red = java.awt.Color.getColor("#FF0000");
green = java.awt.Color.getColor("#00FF00");
blue = java.awt.Color.getColor("#0000FF");

}
};
  • Thanks very much for the elaborate answer and quick response! You have been a great help. – Maarten Dec 29 '12 at 12:43
  • @M.deWit I'm glad I could help. If you feel this answer sufficiently addressed your question, please consider marking it as "accepted" (the check/tick near the top). – user1201210 Dec 29 '12 at 17:11

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