I'm trying to access a google app through the Python Client using this code to gain authorization (private info obviously redacted):

import gflags
import httplib2

from apiclient.discovery import build
from oauth2client.file import Storage
from oauth2client.client import SignedJwtAssertionCredentials
from oauth2client.tools import run

f = open('privatekey.p12', 'rb')
key = f.read()
f.close()
credentials = SignedJwtAssertionCredentials(
    service_account_name='name@developer.gserviceaccount.com',
    private_key=key,
    scope = 'https://www.googleapis.com/auth/calendar')
http = httplib2.Http()
http = credentials.authorize(http)
service = build(serviceName='calendar', version='v3', http=http)

Yet I receive this error:

ImportError: cannot import name SignedJwtAssertionCredentials

I have installed the Google v3 API Python Client as well as OAuth2; I don't seem to be having any other problems with those modules, though I haven't used them much. Anyone know what's going on?

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It seems like you havn't installed pyopenssl. Install via easy_install pyopenssl.

Libraries oauth2client.client
if HAS_OPENSSL:
  # PyOpenSSL is not a prerequisite for oauth2client, so if it is missing then
  # don't create the SignedJwtAssertionCredentials or the verify_id_token()
  # method.

  class SignedJwtAssertionCredentials(AssertionCredentials):
....
  • 10
    I have PyOpenSSL installed (sudo pip install pyopenssl) and I still received the error in question (using Python 2.7 on OSX 10.8.5). My fix was to run sudo pip install pyopenssl --upgrade. – Neil C. Obremski Jan 27 '14 at 21:52

I had this problem today and had to roll back from oauth2client version 2.0 to version 1.5.2 with:

pip install oauth2client==1.5.2
  • 8
    issue explained here: github.com/google/oauth2client/issues/401 – michael Feb 17 '16 at 17:25
  • 2
    Thanks bro. After a very long journey your answer finally helped :-) – Md. Mohsin Feb 22 '16 at 18:57
  • 5
    As michael mentioned above github.com/google/oauth2client/issues/401 explains that SignedJwtAssertionCredentials has been removed and its behaviour is now implemented in auth2client.service_account.ServiceAccountCredentials – Caz Feb 24 '16 at 13:57
  • 2
    Thank you very much....... – Manura Omal Mar 15 '16 at 5:28
  • 3
    This fix does not work with google api client anymore, since it has been updated to require oauthclient 2.0+. Changing SignedJwtAssertionCredentials to ServiceAccountCredentials as outlined above is what you want to do. – Olof Hedman Apr 26 '16 at 9:41

The source repository was recently updated, to make use of the new code:

from apiclient.discovery import build
from oauth2client.service_account import ServiceAccountCredentials

...

As alexander margraf said you need PyOpenSSL to import SignedJwtAssertionCredentials

simply: pip install pyopenssl

REMEMBER: It will fail on Windows if you don't have OpenSSL Win32 libs installed http://slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html (you need full package, not the light version). Also keep in mind you need to add it to your path var before installing pyopenssl

  • Without OpenSSL Win32 installing pyopenssl fails with following error: 'error: Only found improper OpenSSL directories: ...' – Bartoszer Mar 27 '13 at 9:05

I was trying to build a local dev environment and none of the solutions here were working. The extra piece in the puzzle for me was:

$ pip install pycrypto

possibly in addition to any or all of:

$ pip install pyopenssl
$ pip install httplib2
$ pip install oauth2client
$ pip install ssl

GAE has the pycrypto package available internally (check the libraries listed in your app.yaml) so something needing it might work on their machines but not yours - I think - sorry I'm not yet clear on what and why they're making life so miserable with the libraries yet.

Check your oauth2client version first.

If this version >= 2.0, using the ServiceAccountCredentials instead of SignedJwtAssertionCredentials.

Look at the three reference:

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