5

I was playing around with ruby finalizers and noticed some behaviour that is very strange to me. I could reduce the triggering code to the following:

require "weakref"

class Foo
    def initialize
        ObjectSpace.define_finalizer(self, self.class.finalize)
    end

    def self.finalize
        proc {
            puts "finalizing"
        }
    end
end

Foo.new # does not work
#WeakRef.new(foo) # Using this instead, everything works as expected
sleep 1
ObjectSpace.garbage_collect
puts "... this did not finalize the object"

Foo.new
ObjectSpace.garbage_collect
puts "but this did?"

As the program says, no finalizer is run before the second call to Foo.new. I tried adding more delay before the first call to the garbage collector (though as I understand, it shouldn't be neccessary at all), but that doesn't do anything.

Strangely enough, if I use the commented-out line i, the first finalizer gets called as I would expect it to be. The second one is still not called before the program exits.

Can anyone explain why this is happening? I am running Ubuntu 12.10 with ruby 1.9.3p194 (2012-04-20 revision 35410) [x86_64-linux]. I tried reading the weakref code, but as far as I can tell, all it does is storing the objects object_id to retrieve it later.

edit: I understand that manually invoking the garbage collector in a situation like this does not make sense. I'm just trying to understand the mechanics behind this.

2
  • Again, it's that the interpreter doesn't want to take out the trash till the bag is full.
    – Linuxios
    Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 13:10
  • @Linuxios I think that I am forcing it with ObjectSpace.garbage_collect. Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

3

You can't collect your Foo reference because it is referenced in your finalizer! Thus, because the finalizer itself is holding a reference to the object, the GC never collects it, and thus never triggers the finalizer. You can get around this by just using a WeakRef for the finalizer itself:

require "weakref"

class Foo
  class << self
    attr_accessor :objects_finalized

    def finalize
      proc {
        @objects_finalized ||= 0
        @objects_finalized += 1
      }
    end
  end

  def initialize
    ObjectSpace.define_finalizer WeakRef.new(self), self.class.finalize
  end
end

describe Foo do
  it "should be collected" do
    Foo.new
    expect { GC.start }.to change {
      ObjectSpace.each_object(Foo){} }.from(1).to(0)
  end

  it "should be finalized when it is collected" do
    expect { begin; Foo.new; end; GC.start }.to change {
      Foo.objects_finalized }.from(nil).to(1)
  end
end

With results:

% rspec weakref.rb
..

Finished in 0.03322 seconds
2 examples, 0 failures
1
  • I disagree with this answer. It puts a finalizer on a WeakRef object, not the Foo object. So Ruby may run the finalizer when the WeakRef is destroyed, even if the Foo still exists. I also don't believe that the finalizer references the Foo. The finalizer came from a class method, so it holds a reference in self to the Foo class, but not to the Foo object. Commented Sep 16, 2017 at 1:30
1

I found the answer on http://edwinmeyer.com/Release_Integrated_RHG_09_10_2008/chapter05.html (search for "Registers and the Stack")

Because a reference to the object is still stored in a processor register, the garbage collector stays safe and assumes it's still alive.

0

Remember, unlike in languages like Objective-C or C++, where as soon as all references to an object are gone it disappears, Ruby is a garbage collected language. The interpreter has no reason to invoke the bulky inefficient garbage collector for one object. When the garbage collector runs, all other processing stops. That's a big performance hit. The interpreter is smart enough to wait until most of the garbage is out before collecting.

Example: Do you take a trash bag with one piece of garbage to the dumpster? No. You wait until it's full and then go.

If you want to force a GC collection, try GC.garbage_collect to manually invoke the collector. Don't use this in production though unless you have a very good reason.

4
  • GC.garbage_collect does not seem to exist. I tried using GC.start instead of ObjectSpace.garbage_collect (I think that they are the same?) but I am getting the same results. Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 13:07
  • @SimonKohlmeyer: What do you mean, it seems not to exist. Error? Warning? Because otherwise Ruby just isn't cleaning up the object.
    – Linuxios
    Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 13:09
  • GC.garbage_collect gives me an undefined method error. Did you mean GC.start? I tried using that instead of ObjectSpace.garbage_collect, but I see the same behaviour. Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 16:13
  • Garbage_collect is alias for start
    – Linuxios
    Commented Dec 28, 2012 at 16:32

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