2

We often use try catch statements in our method, if the method can return a value, but the value doesn't a string, how to return the exception message? For example:

public int GetFile(string path)
{
    int i;
    try
    {
        //...
        return i;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    { 
        // How to return the ex?
        // If the return type is a custom class, how to deal with it?
    }
 }

How to return the exception?

  • 1
    You cannot return the exception message here. Return some int value which is understood as an error code. Or, throw a custom exception which the calling functions/classes can handle. If return type is a custom class, you could send a null object, or create a new object with some values set which indicate an error has ocurred. – ryadavilli Dec 28 '12 at 5:00
2

You can remove try catch block to throw exception or throw exception from catch block if you want to do something useful in catch block like logging the exception. If you want to send exception message from your method and do not want to throw exception then you can use out string variable to hold the exception message for calling method.

public int GetFile(string path, out string error)
{
    error = string.Empty.
    int i;
    try
    {
        //...
        return i;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    { 
        error = ex.Message;
        // How to return the ex?
        // If the return type is a custom class, how to deal with it?
    }
 }

How to call the method.

string error = string.Empty;
GetFile("yourpath", out error);
  • +1 I usually do this, if such scenario is very necessary – horgh Dec 28 '12 at 5:09
2

If you simply want to throw any exception, remove try/catch block.

If you want to handle specific exceptions you have two options

  1. Handle those exceptions only.

    try
    {
        //...
        return i;
    }
    catch(IOException iex)
    { 
    
        // do something
       throw;
    }
    catch(PathTooLongException pex)
    { 
    
        // do something
       throw;
    }
    
  2. In generic handler do something for certain types

    try
    {
        //...
        return i;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    { 
         if (ex is IOException) 
         { 
         // do something
         }
         if (ex is PathTooLongException) 
         { 
          // do something 
    
         }
         throw;
    }
    
  • 3
    No-no-no. You should not catch all exceptions and then check type. Catch target type explicitly, i.e. catch (IOException) – abatishchev Dec 28 '12 at 5:07
  • you are right. But sometimes that is a very big bolierplate code if to be applied multiple times. There i use generic exception handler. – Tilak Dec 28 '12 at 5:10
  • You can extract shared code into a separate method to increase reuse. But yes, indeed, exception handling is often a sort of functional programming with duplicating code. – abatishchev Dec 28 '12 at 5:12
  • In code #2 a number of checks (or more complex logic) will run first and only then unmatched exception will be thrown. If you don't catch-them-all then it will be thrown immediately. Also such approach increases a chance of mistake. – abatishchev Dec 28 '12 at 5:14
  • 1
    Better to increase shared code and decrease duplicated of possible :) – abatishchev Dec 28 '12 at 5:26
0

you can directly throw your exception, and from calling method or event catch that exception.

public int GetFile(string path)
{
        int i;
        try
        {
            //...
            return i;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        { 
            throw ex;
        }
}

and catch that in calling method like this...

public void callGetFile()
{
      try
      {
           int result = GetFile("your file path");
      }
      catch(exception ex)
      {
           //Catch your thrown excetion here
      }
}
  • 3
    Don't throw ex. Use just throw instead, it doesn't erase the callstack then. – abatishchev Dec 28 '12 at 5:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.