1

This seems to be a pretty frequent question though I didn't find one. Suppose I have this piece of code:

public class MyClass {
    private AnotherClass mField;

    public void changeOne(AnotherClass newOne) {
        // <...> lines of code here
        synchronized (mField) {
            mField = newOne;
        }
        // <...> lines of code here

    }

    public void changeTwo(AnotherClass newTwo) {
        // <...> lines of code here
        mField = newTwo;
        // <...> lines of code here
    }
}

Let's say changeOne() and changeTwo() are called from different threads. Is it enough to have a synchronized block in changeOne() to protect mField from changing by changeTwo()? Or I need to explicitly wrap each place where mField is changed into the synchronized block? (please leave behind synchronized methods and others).

  • What's wrong with synchronized methods? And what are the "others" that we are to leave behind? – Ted Hopp Dec 28 '12 at 6:21
  • @TedHopp I just meant that in the real piece of code which produced this question I'm dealing only with a synchronized block, not synchronized methods, volatile fields. – Andrey Ermakov Dec 28 '12 at 6:24
  • Well, whatever you do, you need to synchronize on a shared lock object, not on the variable that's being modified! (The most obvious convenient lock object for controlling access to a member field is this, which is basically what a synchronized method does.) – Ted Hopp Dec 28 '12 at 6:24
  • @TedHopp Why not on the variable? – Andrey Ermakov Dec 28 '12 at 6:27
  • Not on the variable because after the variable has changed, you are no longer synchronized on the variable; you're synchronized on what used to be the variable. Other threads won't be able to synchronize on the object that you have locked, so there will, in effect, be no synchronization. – Ted Hopp Dec 28 '12 at 6:27
4

You need to explicitly synchronize all modifications to mField using either synchronized block (or) synchronized method. Otherwise more than one thread can change mField by executing changeTwo at a time.

EDIT: As Tedd Hopp suggested, if variable is not volatile reads also need to synchronized and lock you get should be on same object.

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  • So changeTwo won't check if mField is locked without a synchronized block around it? – Andrey Ermakov Dec 28 '12 at 6:13
  • @AndreyErmakov: That is correct. Every thread will create a stack while executing a method, so one thread is unaware of other thread changes unless you synchroize. – kosa Dec 28 '12 at 6:15
  • @Nambari do you mean when two threads are executing changeTwo at the same time, or two threads where first is executing changeOne and second is executing changeTwo? – Walery Strauch Dec 28 '12 at 6:18
  • 1
    It's not enough to synchronize just the modifications. If a read is not synchronized and the variable is not declared volatile, then the reading threads may be using thread-local copies of a stale value even after a synchronized block exits after modifying the variable. See pattern 5 in Brian Goetz's article Managing volatility. – Ted Hopp Dec 28 '12 at 6:19
  • 1
    @WaleryStrauch: Both cases. – kosa Dec 28 '12 at 6:20
0

No it's not, both Threads must try and aquire the same lock, then if Thread A took the lock first Thread B will be blocked till A releases it. Lock can be any Object common for both A and B, most typical for your case is

public class MyClass {
    private AnotherClass mField;

        public synchronized void changeOne(AnotherClass newOne) {
             ...
        }

        public synchronzied void changeTwo(AnotherClass newTwo) {
             ...
        }

in this case this is used as the lock. It is equivalent (almost) to

    public void changeOne(AnotherClass newOne) {
         synchronized(this) {
              ...
         }
    }

    public void changeTwo(AnotherClass newOne) {
         synchronized(this) {
              ...
         }
    }

synchronized method is more compact while synchronized block is more flexible. With synchronized block you lock on any object while with synchronized method you lock implicitly either on this or for static methods on class.

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