4

The below is the code which I need to optimize and planned that it would be good to move to switch. But I can compare in case. So I planned to make the comaparision ( len > 3 ) as default case.

If I make the comparision part ( len > 3 ) as default case and add default as first in swith will it be faster?

Or how can I make the below code as switch statement?

            if ( len > 3 ) {
                    which will happen more often;
            }               
            else if ( len == 3 ) {
                    next case which may occur often;
            } else if ( len == 2 ) {        
                   the next priority case;
            } else {
                    and this case occurs rarely;
            }
  • You can't move a range from 4 to the max value into a switch. It needs compile-time case labels. – chris Dec 28 '12 at 7:27
  • @chris Thanks for your reply. But I remember I studied somewhere even if you have more the two else if its better to move to switch? – 2vision2 Dec 28 '12 at 7:31
  • Well, sure it can look better if it's actually a possible move. This one isn't. – chris Dec 28 '12 at 7:35
  • @2vision2 it can be more readable and scalable but that's not related to performance – SomeWittyUsername Dec 28 '12 at 7:35
  • Thanks for all your answers and I would accept @icepack answer as its the best one. – 2vision2 Dec 28 '12 at 8:23
6

Probably not. Both if...else and switch...case are high-level constructs. What slows you down is the branch prediction. The better your prediction is the faster your code will run. You should put your most occurring case in first if, second in the else if and so on, just like you wrote. For switch the result depends on the internal compiler implementation which can reorder the cases despite your own order. The default should be actually reserved for the less occurring situations because rest of the conditions must be checked before falling back to default.

To conclude all this, performance-wise usage of if...else is optimal as long as you set your conditions in the correct order. Regarding switch...case it's compiler specific and depends on the applied optimizations.

Also note that switch...case is more limited than if...else since it supports only simple comparison of values.

  • thanks for your reply. there is a case where switch will select the correct case at first instance. I read this somewhere. But am not sure. Some kindda sortin used in swith I guess. correct me if am wrong. – 2vision2 Dec 28 '12 at 7:36
  • The running code exams the first case, after that the second and so on. So you can "sort" the cases by the order of occurrence, from high to low – SomeWittyUsername Dec 28 '12 at 7:38
  • No am talking about how switch internally works.Its sure that it is much faster than else if ladder. and also it is faster because it will select the case by using sorting techniques internally? – 2vision2 Dec 28 '12 at 7:44
  • 1
    AFAIK, some compilers actually "implement" a switch with enough cases as a binary search, so it can be better than a purely linear if ... else combo. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Dec 28 '12 at 8:32
  • 1
    @2vision2 Go for it. There are probably some insights people can provide. You can also try on cs.stackexchange.com – SomeWittyUsername Dec 28 '12 at 9:35
3

Although you've accepted what is probably the best answer, I wanted to provide an alternative.

Note that the standard caveat applies - optimisation isn't optimisation unless you've profiled your code.

However if you are encountering poor performance relating to branches, you can reduce or eliminate them. That your code has one or more inequality comparisons is not an obstacle - you can reduce your cases down to a set of direct equalities, and if necessary use that to index a table, rather than branch at all.

void doSomething(int len)
{
    static const char* str[] =
    {   "%2d > 3\n",
        "%2d < 2\n",
        "%2d = 2\n",
        "%2d = 3\n"
    };

    int m1 = (len-2)>>31;
    int m2 = (len-4)>>31;

    int r = (len & m2 & ~m1) + !!m1;

    printf(str[r],len); 
}

Note that this codes makes several assumptions which may not hold in practice, but as we're making the wild assumption that this even needs optimising in the first place...

Also, note that better optimisations may be possible with more knowledge about the actual range and type of the input parameter, and indeed what the actual actions taken need to be.

  • Interesting, I see what you meant now. I wasn't thinking much beyond the switch syntax. How unbecoming of a programmer! – chris Dec 28 '12 at 9:11
  • hi Jason. Thnaks a lot for your answer. And its interesting though. It encourages learners like me to visit SO often.. – 2vision2 Dec 28 '12 at 9:16
  • It's interesting that you can avoid any branching, but at what cost. Given the amount of additional operations, and the fact that one condition is far more frequent than the others, a good compiler will arrange that one to do no branching (assuming that a correctly predicted branch really is expensive), so all the above really achieves is obfuscation. – James Kanze Dec 28 '12 at 10:53
  • @JamesKanze As I said at the top, it isn't optimisation unless you've profiled. That said, I've certainly worked with compilers for which this would be a win. But assuming either case without profiling is folly. – JasonD Dec 28 '12 at 11:06
2

you can't move comparisons into a switch statement.. it uses single checks for its selections.. ie:

switch (len) {

    case 1:
        // do case 1 stuff here
    break;
    case 2:
        // do case 2 stuff here
    break;
    case 3:
        // do case 3 stuff here
    break;
}

use breaks to prevent the case statements from running into each other read more here

your code is as 'optimized' as it will get in its current state..

1

The only way you're going to know is to benchmark it with your compiler. If performance is an issue, you should use the option to provide the compiler with profiler output, and let it decide; it will generally find the best solution. (Note that even on a specific architecture, like Intel, the best solution in terms of machine instructions may vary from one processor to the next.)

In your case, the switch would probably look like:

switch ( len ) {
case 2:
    //  ...
    break;

case 3:
    //  ...
    break;

default:
    if ( len > 3 ) {
        // ...
    } else {
        // ...
    }
}

With only two effective cases, the compiler doesn't have much to work with. A typical implementation (without extreme optimization) would do bounds checking, then a table lookup for the two explicit cases. Any decent compiler will then pick up that the comparison in your default case corresponds to one of the bounds checks it has already done, and not duplicate it. But with only two cases, the jump table will probably not make a significant difference compared to the two comparisons, especially as you'll be out of bounds in the most frequent case.

Until you have actual profiler information that this is a bottleneck in your code, I wouldn't worry about it. Once you have that information, you can profile different variants to see which is faster, but I suspect that if you use maximum optimization and feed profiling information back into the compiler, there will be no difference.

1

If you are worried about speed, the truth is that your if...else or switch...case statements won't have a real impact of your application speed unless you have hundreds of them. The places where you lose speed is in your iterations or loops. To answer your question specifically, you cannot convert your if...else statement to a switch...case statement with the default appearing first; but with that said, if you did convert to a switch...case then you will that they run at the same speed (difference is too minute to be picked up by conventional benchmarking tools).

  • 2
    if if else or switch case in a loop, it will have a very real impact – SomeWittyUsername Dec 28 '12 at 7:44
  • I think it would depend on the size of the loop. But in this case, there is only four conditions to check; the difference would have many decimal places and is not really an area that needs to have the developer's attention. – Akash Dec 28 '12 at 7:51
0

You can use a range in a case:

switch (len) {
  case 3 ... INT_MAX:
    // ...
    break;
  case 2:
    // ...
    break;
  default:
    // ...
    break;
 }

Edit: but that is an extension provided by GCC...

  • It says that this is not standard in here: is that still the case? stackoverflow.com/questions/5924681/… – Caribou Dec 28 '12 at 7:42
  • my bad, did not know that – piwi Dec 28 '12 at 7:42
  • it's a nice construct :) I just hadn't ever seen it and was curious – Caribou Dec 28 '12 at 7:43
  • @Caribou well as your link indicates, compiling with the -pedantic option does warn about the "non-standard-ness" (gcc 4.7.2); too bad it's not in the standard though – piwi Dec 28 '12 at 7:53
  • I agree actually - I wonder if the compiler can do any kind of optimization using this? or whether it becomes the same as the "if..else" code. One for my coffee break maybe :) – Caribou Dec 28 '12 at 7:57

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