1

If I create a new Console application then this compiles ok:

Module Module1

    Sub Main()
        Console.ReadKey()
    End Sub

End Module

An alternative is this:

Imports System.Console
Module Module1

    Sub Main()
        ReadKey()
    End Sub

End Module

What I don't now understand is, as this is a console application, why aren't these projects created in such a way that the following will compile?:

Module Module1

    Sub Main()
        ReadKey()
    End Sub

End Module

Put another way: if it is a Console app why do I need to import the Console namespace?

Is this the same behavior as when using a winForms application I say Me.someControl? Although in that situation I can leave of the Me and it will still compile without importing a forms namespace.

EDIT

Imports System.Console
Module Module1

    Sub Main()
        ReadKey()
        Console.ReadKey()  '<<adding namespace seems a bit pointless as I still need to specify Console
    End Sub

    Function ReadKey() As Boolean
        Return True
    End Function

End Module

FURTHER EDIT

Hans has suggested further behaviour and to replicate this I have the following:

I've added a new ClassLibrary1 to the same Solution like so...

enter image description here

In the Console ConsoleSandpit I've got the following, with a reference to ClassLibrary1 like so...

enter image description here

...only problem is I'm expecting a compilation error from the above but it seems to be running ok!

  • Put another way: why do any namespaces exist? Why not have all functions available without any namespaces or prefixes? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 28 '12 at 8:29
  • different objects will have different functions available to them, but I suppose these functions might have the same name e.g ObjectX.functionA might exist but also ObjectY.functionA. But if you are already inside a console application it seems strange that the console has to be explicitly referenced; although I suppose it is similar to saying Me.X when inside a winforms project ? – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 8:37
2

System.Console is not a namespace. ReadKey is a shared method in the Console class which is in the System namespace

So, the breakdown of the following statement is:

System.Console.ReadKey()
  • System - Namespace
  • Console - Class
  • ReadKey - Shared method

So, when you call Console.ReadKey() (without specifying the namespace), you would normally expect to have to import System at the top of your code file. However, that is unnecessary because in VB.NET projects, you can specify a list of default namespaces that are automatically imported for all files in the project. You can modify these using the check-list of default namespaces in your project properties designer. System, among others, is automatically imported as a default namespace with all of the project templates.

As you demonstrated in your question, it is possible in VB.NET to import a class or module name. The Imports statement is not limited to just working with namespaces. However, as far as I know, there is no way to import a class name with the default namespaces option for the project (or at least not with the project properties designer, anyway).

If System.Console was a namespace, I agree that you'd expect the project template for console projects to import that namespace by default. However, since it's not a namespace at all, you wouldn't expect it to do that :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    might have to tick this to push you over 10k !! – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 11:57
  • Woohoo! Finally! Thanks :) – Steven Doggart Dec 28 '12 at 11:57
  • did you get one of those congratulation screens with loads of flashing lights and fireworks? – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 11:58
  • 1
    I can't reproduce the exact behavior Hans is describing either. The closest I can come to is if you create the class library with that method and you intend to call THAT method, you can't do so easily if you have an Imports System.Console at the top of your file. Otherwise, it all compiles for me too, so I'm not sure what he's referring to, specifically. – Steven Doggart Dec 28 '12 at 13:54
  • 1
    I never import class names. I find that confusing. In fact I find it annoying that module names are always imported by default. But, as far as what's normal? I'd say I've never seen anyone import System.Console. Any time I've seen or worked with console project code, the code always precedes all of the calls to Console methods with the class' name. – Steven Doggart Jan 2 '13 at 18:50
1

1) You can do plenty of useful things, over many functions, inside a console application, without wanting or needing to actually interact with the Console.

2) I could easily envisage wanting to write a function called ReadKey which puts out a small prompt for one of two or three keys to be pressed - based on the user input, if its one of those keys, return it. Otherwise, indicate the error and re-prompt. Why should I have to pick a different name for this function, because my own namespace has been automatically polluted with the methods from Console?

Namespaces exist to help to separate and organize functionality. You're given options (such as the Imports statement) to hide these separations, where it makes sense for you within your application - but I wouldn't want this forced on all users.

| improve this answer | |
  • ...imports doesn't seem to help if I create a function ReadKey - I then have to explicitly write Console.ReadKey if I want to use the console's readKey function as apposed to my function – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 8:58
1

Add a class library project to your solution and paste this code:

Module FooBar
    Sub ReadKey(ByVal wait As Integer)
    End Sub
End Module

And observe how your original code now suddenly fails to compile. With a seriously obtuse error message as well: "Argument not specified for parameter 'wait'". You can lose hours of your life trying to figure out why Console.ReadKey() wants a wait argument.

| improve this answer | |
  • +1 suspect I'm not following your instructions correctly Hans as mine seems to still compile - can I edit your post with my attempt at following these instructions - you can then re-edit with correct steps? – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 10:34
  • I tested this scenario before posting. I doubt you'll improve it by editing. – Hans Passant Dec 28 '12 at 10:36
  • No Hans - I'm a newbie who is interested in the bevaviour you are telling me about but I'm having problems replicating it - I'll edit my OP with steps I'm going through - maybe you can review them and tell me what I'm doing wrong? – whytheq Dec 28 '12 at 10:45

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