32

How do I wait for the File to be Free so that ss.Save() can overwrite it with a new one. If I run this twice close together(ish) I get a generic GDI+ error.

    ///<summary>
    /// Grabs a screen shot of the App and saves it to the C drive in jpg
    ///</summary>
    private static String GetDesktopImage(DevExpress.XtraEditors.XtraForm whichForm)
    {
        Rectangle bounds = whichForm.Bounds;

        // This solves my problem but creates a clutter issue
        //var timeStamp = DateTime.Now.ToString("ddd-MMM-dd-yyyy-hh-mm-ss");
        //var fileName = "C:\\HelpMe" + timeStamp + ".jpg";

        var fileName = "C:\\HelpMe.jpg";
        File.Create(fileName);
        using (Bitmap ss = new Bitmap(bounds.Width, bounds.Height))
        using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(ss))
        {
            g.CopyFromScreen(whichForm.Location, Point.Empty, bounds.Size);
            ss.Save(fileName, ImageFormat.Jpeg);
        }

        return fileName;
    }
54

A function like this will do it:

public static bool IsFileReady(string filename)
{
    // If the file can be opened for exclusive access it means that the file
    // is no longer locked by another process.
    try
    {
        using (FileStream inputStream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
            return inputStream.Length > 0;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Stick it in a while loop and you have something which will block until the file is accessible:

public static void WaitForFile(string filename)
{
    //This will lock the execution until the file is ready
    //TODO: Add some logic to make it async and cancelable
    while (!IsFileReady(filename)) { }
}
  • 70
    you can also do return inputStream.Length > 0;. I never liked those if (condition) return true; else return false;.. – Default Jun 11 '12 at 14:55
  • 6
    @Default I think returning true/false is more readable – Gordon Thompson Jun 16 '12 at 17:10
  • 6
    -1 because: thedailywtf.com/Comments/…. The right way: stackoverflow.com/a/876513/160173 – David Murdoch Nov 7 '13 at 17:54
  • 1
    isReady = inputStream.Length > 0; return isReady; // readable and better than return true else return false ... ''' – pashute Sep 10 '15 at 7:20
  • 1
    Catching all exceptions is a very bad practice, you should be more precise in what constitutes a fact that the file is simply inaccessible. – BartoszKP Feb 15 '18 at 13:35
13

If you check access before writing to the file some other process might snatch the access again before you manage to do your write. Therefor I would suggest one of the following two:

  1. Wrap what you want to do in a retry scope that won't hide any other error
  2. Create a wrapper method that waits until you can get a stream and use that stream

getting a stream

private FileStream GetWriteStream(string path, int timeoutMs)
{
    var time = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    while (time.ElapsedMilliseconds < timeoutMs)
    {
        try
        {
            return new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            // access error
            if (e.HResult != -2147024864)
                throw;
        }
    }

    throw new TimeoutException($"Failed to get a write handle to {path} within {timeoutMs}ms.");
}

then use it like this:

using (var stream = GetWriteStream("path"))
{
    using (var writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
        writer.Write("test");
}

retry scope

private void WithRetry(Action action, int timeoutMs = 1000)
{
    var time = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    while(time.ElapsedMilliseconds < timeoutMs)
    {
        try
        {
            action();
            return;
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            // access error
            if (e.HResult != -2147024864)
                throw;
        }
    }
    throw new Exception("Failed perform action within allotted time.");
}

and then use WithRetry(() => File.WriteAllText(Path.Combine(_directory, name), contents));

  • I also created a gist for a class wrapping this behavior. Bear in mind of course that doing this might mean that your architecture has issues if several classes are reading and writing to the same file in a conflicting manner. You may end up losing data this way. gist.github.com/ddikman/667f309706fdf4f68b9fab2827b1bcca – Almund May 11 '16 at 6:41
  • I don't know why this isn't the accepted answer. The code is much safer; calling IsFileReady in a while loop, as Gordon Thompson's answer suggests could potentially fail. Another process could lock the file between when the loop condition checks if its available and your process tries to actually access it. Only thing, e.HResult is inaccessible because it is protected. – mjones.udri Jan 5 '17 at 20:13
  • Thanks for the support although my suggested solution is pretty cluttered in comparison. I don't much like the look of it however since there's no built in support in the framework you're left with few options. I was using the HResult though, might be different between framework versions maybe, I'm sure there's some other property that can be used to detect which error the IOException contains though. – Almund Jan 7 '17 at 6:09
  • I know you can use the Message property and do string comparison but that's kinda ugly IMO – mjones.udri Jan 7 '17 at 19:12
  • I agree, I wouldn't check the message unless I have to. I double checked MSDN about the HResult though and in the later versions of the framework (after 3.5) it's public. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Almund Jan 10 '17 at 7:04
3

There is no function out there which will allow you to wait on a particular handle / file system location to be available for writing. Sadly, all you can do is poll the handle for writing.

3

Here is a solution that may be overkill for some users. I've created a new static class which has an event which is triggered only when the file finishes copying.

The user registers files which they would like to watch by calling FileAccessWatcher.RegisterWaitForFileAccess(filePath). If the file is not already being watched a new task is started which repeatedly checks the file to see if it can be opened. Each time it checks it also reads the file size. If the file size does not increase in a pre-defined time (5 minutes in my example) the loop is exited.

When the loop exits from the file being accessible or from the timeout the FileFinishedCopying event is triggered.

public class FileAccessWatcher
{
    // this list keeps track of files being watched
    private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, FileAccessWatcher> watchedFiles = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, FileAccessWatcher>();

    public static void RegisterWaitForFileAccess(string filePath)
    {
        // if the file is already being watched, don't do anything
        if (watchedFiles.ContainsKey(filePath))
        {
            return;
        }
        // otherwise, start watching it
        FileAccessWatcher accessWatcher = new FileAccessWatcher(filePath);
        watchedFiles[filePath] = accessWatcher;
        accessWatcher.StartWatching();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Event triggered when the file is finished copying or when the file size has not increased in the last 5 minutes.
    /// </summary>
    public static event FileSystemEventHandler FileFinishedCopying;

    private static readonly TimeSpan MaximumIdleTime = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5);

    private readonly FileInfo file;

    private long lastFileSize = 0;

    private DateTime timeOfLastFileSizeIncrease = DateTime.Now;

    private FileAccessWatcher(string filePath)
    {
        this.file = new FileInfo(filePath);
    }

    private Task StartWatching()
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(this.RunLoop);
    }

    private void RunLoop()
    {
        while (this.IsFileLocked())
        {
            long currentFileSize = this.GetFileSize();
            if (currentFileSize > this.lastFileSize)
            {
                this.lastFileSize = currentFileSize;
                this.timeOfLastFileSizeIncrease = DateTime.Now;
            }

            // if the file size has not increased for a pre-defined time limit, cancel
            if (DateTime.Now - this.timeOfLastFileSizeIncrease > MaximumIdleTime)
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        this.RemoveFromWatchedFiles();
        this.RaiseFileFinishedCopyingEvent();
    }

    private void RemoveFromWatchedFiles()
    {
        FileAccessWatcher accessWatcher;
        watchedFiles.TryRemove(this.file.FullName, out accessWatcher);
    }

    private void RaiseFileFinishedCopyingEvent()
    {
        FileFinishedCopying?.Invoke(this,
            new FileSystemEventArgs(WatcherChangeTypes.Changed, this.file.FullName, this.file.Name));
    }

    private long GetFileSize()
    {
        return this.file.Length;
    }

    private bool IsFileLocked()
    {
        try
        {
            using (this.file.Open(FileMode.Open)) { }
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            var errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(e) & ((1 << 16) - 1);

            return errorCode == 32 || errorCode == 33;
        }

        return false;
    }
}

Example usage:

// register the event
FileAccessWatcher.FileFinishedCopying += FileAccessWatcher_FileFinishedCopying;

// start monitoring the file (put this inside the OnChanged event handler of the FileSystemWatcher
FileAccessWatcher.RegisterWaitForFileAccess(fileSystemEventArgs.FullPath);

Handle the FileFinishedCopyingEvent:

private void FileAccessWatcher_FileFinishedCopying(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("File finished copying: " + e.FullPath);
}
2
bool isLocked = true;
while (isLocked)
 try {
  System.IO.File.Move(filename, filename2);
  isLocked = false;
 }
 catch { }
 System.IO.File.Move(filename2, filename);
  • 2
    Moving a file to find out if it is locked, regardless of contextual knowledge of the file's purpose, is not a good approach. – Nick Bedford Nov 27 '18 at 2:32
2

You can let the System wait, until the process is closed.

Just as simple as this:

Process.Start("the path of your text file or exe").WaitForExit();

  • 1
    And who is supposed to close (exit) the newly started process? – astrowalker Mar 29 at 8:38
1

Using @Gordon Thompson 's answer, you have to create a loop such as the code below:

public static bool IsFileReady(string sFilename)
{
    try
    {
        using (FileStream inputStream = File.Open(sFilename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
            return inputStream.Length > 0;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

while (!IsFileReady(yourFileName)) ;

I found an optimized way that doesn't cause CPU overhead:

public static bool IsFileReady(this string sFilename)
{
    try
    {
        using (FileStream inputStream = File.Open(sFilename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
            return inputStream.Length > 0;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

SpinWait.SpinUntil(yourFileName.IsFileReady);
0

You could use a lock statement with a Dummy variable, and it seems to work great.

Check here.

0

Taking the top answer I wrote a similar one, but it's async, non-blocking, awaitable, cancelable (just stop the task) and checks the exception thrown.

public static async Task IsFileReady(string filename)
    {
        await Task.Run(() =>
        {
            if (!File.Exists(path))
            {
                throw new IOException("File does not exist!");
            }

            var isReady = false;

            while (!isReady)
            {
                // If the file can be opened for exclusive access it means that the file
                // is no longer locked by another process.
                try
                {
                    using (FileStream inputStream =
                        File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
                        isReady = inputStream.Length > 0;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    // Check if the exception is related to an IO error.
                    if (e.GetType() == typeof(IOException))
                    {
                        isReady = false;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // Rethrow the exception as it's not an exclusively-opened-exception.
                        throw;
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }

You can use it in this fashion:

Task ready = IsFileReady(path);

ready.Wait(1000);

if (!ready.IsCompleted)
{
    throw new FileLoadException($"The file {path} is exclusively opened by another process!");
}

File.Delete(path);

If you have to really wait for it, or in a more JS-promise-way:

IsFileReady(path).ContinueWith(t => File.Delete(path));

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