5

Database type: MySql

Supposing there are two rows like this in my table:

[1.] "Peter went to the park yesterday"
[2.] "Peter is going the park tomorrow"

...and assuming I have this as pattern string:

"Mark went to the cinema yesterday"

...How could I make a query to get the first record? There could be many other cases where the first record would be the one I am looking for:

-"Leonard went to the Library last night"
-"Jake went to London last year"

...and so on.


Note: I am not showing the table structure because the real issue is the condition I have to look for. However, we could suppose the table is called table, and there are two fields (id and string)

Edit: I know there are FULLTEXT index in MySql which may help to get this work. I have also read they do not work with innoDB tables (which I am working with). (If it is just impossible, I could redesign my DB to make this table be MyISAM)

Edit: As eggyal says in the first comment to this question, "v5.6" supports innoDB tables too.

Edit: Another example would be:

[1.] The heaven looks blue today
[2.] The fire looks red today

And I want to get the first record by assuming:

The ocean looks blue today

...as pattern string.

(In this case, the second record would be a match too, with less relevance than the first one, since it contains looks $ today)

3
  • 3
    From your most recent edit, it sounds as though fulltext search is exactly what you're after: e.g. WHERE MATCH(myColumn) AGAINST ('Mark went to the cinema yesterday') > 0 ORDER BY MATCH(myColumn) AGAINST ('Mark went to the cinema yesterday') DESC. – eggyal Dec 29 '12 at 12:24
  • 3
    Yes, a relevance score >0 means that there is at least some relevance. FULLTEXT search is case insensitive. More/less relevance will come from more/less matches between the pattern and the field. – eggyal Dec 29 '12 at 12:42
  • All right, working nice. Thanks a lot (now I can vote you up) – Mark Tower Dec 29 '12 at 12:43
3

You can use like in the query. See following examples:

mysql> select * from statements;
+----------------------------------+
| sentence                         |
+----------------------------------+
| Peter went to the park yesterday |
| Mark went to the cinema          |
| Peter is going the park tomorrow |
| Mark went to the park yesterday  |
| Mark went to the park tommorow   |
+----------------------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from statements where sentence like '% went to the park yesterday';
+----------------------------------+
| sentence                         |
+----------------------------------+
| Peter went to the park yesterday |
| Mark went to the park yesterday  |
+----------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from statements where sentence like '% went to the park %';
+----------------------------------+
| sentence                         |
+----------------------------------+
| Peter went to the park yesterday |
| Mark went to the park yesterday  |
| Mark went to the park tommorow   |
+----------------------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)
1
  • The third example should exactly give what Mark ased for. +1 – Ridcully Jan 3 '13 at 13:12

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