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Can ctags tag symbols from a directory up in the hierarchy also or is it limited to create tags for current and sub-directories only?

Basically I'm looking for Visual Studio like symbol cross referencing it is very helpful in understanding alien source code flow.

If not Vim, then which other editor should I use?

thanks

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4 Answers 4

Ctags only recurses to subdirectories. But all you have to do is run ctags -R . in your project home directory, and it will create a tags file for your whole project.

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yes thats correct but when i open a file say proj/dir1/def.c and press ctrl+] on a function name which is defined say in proj/dir2/abc.c, I get tag not found :( –  rsjethani Dec 29 '12 at 21:59
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ctags generates relative path names. So your current directory in vim should be proj in order for the tags file to point to the correct files. Perhaps you could write a script to adjust the contents of the tags file to point to absolute path names, but I haven't tried that. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 29 '12 at 22:46

You aren't limited to specifying one tags file in Vim. This is an alternative to the other answers; you can just do something like:

set tags=tags,~/wintags,c:/path/to/moretags/etc

So you don't need to take the time regenerating a monolithic tags file when you just want to update your local tags.

Regarding the OP's comment in another answer,

yes thats correct but when i open a file say proj/dir1/def.c and press ctrl+] on a function name which is defined say in proj/dir2/abc.c, I get tag not found :(

You could also create one tags file for all of your projects at the 'proj' root:

set tags=tags;c:/path/to/proj

This will use the first file named tags that it finds as it walks up the directory hierarchy from where you are.

You can combine these two techniques to have a project-local tags file and then a "global" tags file that isn't updated as often.

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Whilst it's got similar user interface for asking it to do it's thing, so you need to actually specify "go down directories", I find that cscope is a very nice tool, whcih does everything that ctags does and a bit more.

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ctags (well, exctags at least) can create tags for as many directory trees you want. Simply run

exctags -R dir1 dir2 ...

Then vim knows about all the symbols you need. For example, one of the directories could be /usr/include in addition to your own source directory.

Make sure to run vim path/to/file.c from the same directory you created the tags file in.

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