2

I have three files : myh.h; my.cpp; use.cpp. Here are the contents of the files:

myh.h

extern int foo;
void print_foo();
void print(int);

my.cpp

#include "myh.h"
#include <iostream>
void print_foo()
{
    std::cout<<foo<<std::endl;
}
void print(int i)
{
    std::cout<<i<<std::endl;
}

use.cpp

#include "myh.h"
int main()
{
    foo=7;
    print_foo();
    print(99);
    return 0;
}

GCC spews out the following error:

my.o:my.cpp:(.text+0x7): undefined reference to `foo'
use.o:use.cpp:(.text+0x10): undefined reference to `foo'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

I compile the files using the -c command and it doesn't give errors. I link using the following command:

g++ -o final my.o use.o

What is the problem here, I read other topics with similar problems, and the case here is just strange .....

For the curious this is an exercise drill from Stroustrup's book Programming principles of using C++

Edit: I did as dasblinkenlight said, and in use.cpp I added an int in front of foo (so now foo is defined), but I still get this error:

my.o:my.cpp:(.text+0x7): undefined reference to `foo'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Which tells me that it is not defined in my.cpp also? If I have to define it everywhere what is the point of including it in the header file, or how should this be approached more appropriately?

  • @mcalex it doesn't matter what the name is, as long as it is the same – lekroif Dec 30 '12 at 2:38
  • @lekroif: Actually, if you need to link with Sun CC and use its funny external template mechanism, you distinctly want to have different base names for the header and implementation if there is a template declared in the header (otherwise it will kind of include the implementation file whenever the template is used). – Dietmar Kühl Dec 30 '12 at 2:41
  • @Dietmar I suspected that some compilers might behave like that and that is why I have named the header myh.h In the original exercise the instructions were to name it my.h (same as the cpp file). – lekroif Dec 30 '12 at 2:51
8

You get a linker error because you declared foo, but you never defined it.

extern int foo is only a declaration; it does not cause allocation of memory for the foo variable, only promises that you will do it at some other place. To fix it, you need to add this line to one of the cpp files, like this:

#include "myh.h"
int foo;
int main()
{
    foo=7;
    print_foo();
    print(99);
    return 0;
}
  • Ok, logical, I defined foo in the use.cpp by adding "int" in front of it. I get one error less, but I still have linking errors: my.o:my.cpp:(.text+0x7): undefined reference to `foo' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status Why? If I define it in every file what is the point of including it then... – lekroif Dec 30 '12 at 2:47
  • @lekroif I edited the answer to show where to define foo (it needs to be in the global, i.e. the outermost scope). I tried this locally, and everything worked fine. – dasblinkenlight Dec 30 '12 at 3:10
  • Yes, thanks!!!I will do a bit more reading to figure out the source of my confusion. – lekroif Dec 30 '12 at 3:12
  • This has got to be a dupe. I see a question like this asked at least once a month. – Omnifarious Dec 30 '12 at 3:45
3

The problem is that foo is declared but not defined. You need to define foo in exactly one of the translation units, e.g.:

int foo = 0;

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